Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
March 21, 2019, 11:44:16 PM
Home Help Login Register
News:

CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  The Lobby  |  Topic: Senior Member Physical Fitness
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 6 Send this topic Print
Author Topic: Senior Member Physical Fitness  (Read 19307 times)
winterg
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 746
Unit: SER-FL-182

« on: December 30, 2015, 12:20:17 PM »

“According to the most recent data released September 2015, rates of obesity now exceed 35 percent in three states (Arkansas, West Virginia and Mississippi), 22 states have rates above 30 percent, 45 states are above 25 percent, and every state is above 20 percent. Arkansas has the highest adult obesity rate at 35.9 percent, while Colorado has the lowest at 21.3 percent.”
http://stateofobesity.org/rates/

Physical fitness and Senior Members in Civil Air Patrol.  It is a controversial topic and has been argued ad naseum in many threads here.  But my hope in creating this thread is to maybe put our collective heads together to try and come up with ideas to combat this in our organization.

Rather than argue whether the restriction of USAF style uniforms to members who meet the height/weight requirements is obesity discrimination, I propose we use our collective abilities to gather resources that will hopefully aid ourselves and fellow members to lead healthier lifestyles.  We can work to help create a culture of healthy choices in our organization for the betterment of all of our members.

The usual arguments are that,

“I have old injuries that prevent me from working out.”  There are medically approved exercise and diet programs that are designed to work around any injury, even amputations.

“I’m just too old.”  There are exercise and diet programs for any age category.

“I don’t have any time!”  Proper diet and exercise of just 20 minutes a day, a few days a week, will possibly add years to your life.  Think of it as banking time.

“I can’t afford a gym membership.”  Rocky didn’t need a gym!

“I have a medical condition that causes the weight gain.”  There are actual medical causes of weight gain such as hyperthyroidism, Cushing’s Syndrome, Depression, and medications.  All of which are treatable by a physician.  And I am not claiming that any of these issues are easy to deal with by any means.

The bottom line is, we as members can, and should, be doing more to promote healthy lifestyles in our organization for the well-being of our members as well as to be the example in our communities.

Why can’t CAP as an organization negotiate a corporate rate with a gym chain the way many organizations and companies do?

The Presidents Challenge program is used as a basis for our cadet physical fitness standards.  The Presidents Challenge has programs for all ages that we can voluntarily incorporate into our program as senior members.  I am not talking about senior members passing a mile run or being able to pass the CPFT.  But as an organization, we currently do nothing to promote and encourage a healthy lifestyle among our senior members and I wholeheartedly believe we can and should be doing this.

If you think that CAP has no business offering healthy choices to its members, then that is fine.  But if you have ideas, I am interested in hearing them.
Report to moderator   Logged
THRAWN
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,904

« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2015, 01:33:00 PM »

Good thoughts here. Thought that the HSOs were supposed to have a role in this. Do they still exist?

As the population gets older and fatter, its always a good idea to revisit what we are and are not doing. I've always found it to be a bit hypocritical of the senior membership to demand physical fitness from the cadets when the stereotype is of a donut dusted coffee swilling senior.

Getting active doesn't mean squadron PT, but there should be some kind of physical fitness program for those that wish to participate. Face it, there are some people, even in our ranks, that are just plain vanilla lazy. A culture of physical fitness, healthy living and well being should be encouraged. This can be as simple as having seniors participate in drill (if you have never done it, or are out of practice, it can be a bit of a challenge), or other incentive based programs with some structure to them.

My first year as a squadron commander, we had full squadron drill, and for the seniors we had a "biggest loser" type of program. Those that did not participate regretted that they did not.

Your point about the gyms is a good one. Check out your locality for municipal gyms. Lots of times they are free and go mostly unused. If the Scouts and local teams can use them as a group, no reason that CAP can't...
« Last Edit: December 30, 2015, 02:39:54 PM by THRAWN » Report to moderator   Logged
Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
AFRCC SMC 10-97
NSS ISC 05-00
USAF SOS 2000
USAF ACSC 2011
US NWC 2016
dwb
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,347

« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2015, 02:25:31 PM »

Fitness is not a component of the senior member professional development program. Fitness is a component of the cadet program, which is why we evaluate on it and why we emphasize it.

I support the idea of encouraging healthy habits among all of our members (which, you know, units are welcome to do today). I don't know of an easy way to shoehorn fitness education into the PD program.

When the new CAPP 52-18 hits, there will exist an optional fitness education officer role. I'm down with the idea of encouraging seniors to participate in the educational portions of the new program, maybe with lesson plans specific to their age groups.

There are already so many requirements we place on our volunteers. I would be very apprehensive to add something else to that burden, even if it is a worthwhile cause like fitness.
Report to moderator   Logged
winterg
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 746
Unit: SER-FL-182

« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2015, 02:35:47 PM »

Nowhere did I suggest, nor am I advocating, adding a physical fitness requirement to the senior member PD program. That would be a sure fire way to make sure it never happened. 

I am, however, advocating that CAP take a larger role in promoting and encouraging a healthier lifestyle for our entire membership, not just cadets.  And not at the unit level, here and there, but rather the national level.

Incentive programs for fitness achievments as provided by the President's Challenge program cones to mind.  More emphasis on healthy food choices for any budget.

The addition of a physical fitness officer is great.  But I am sure this will be only for the cadet program and not the adult membership.
Report to moderator   Logged
FW
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,186

« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2015, 02:58:48 PM »

Good thoughts here. Thought that the HSOs were supposed to have a role in this. Do they still exist?

As the population gets older and fatter, its always a good idea to revisit what we are and are not doing. I've always found it to be a bit hypocritical of the senior membership to demand physical fitness from the cadets when the stereotype is of a donut dusted coffee swilling senior.

Getting active doesn't mean squadron PT, but there should be some kind of physical fitness program for those that wish to participate. Face it, there are some people, even in our ranks, that are just plain vanilla lazy. A culture of physical fitness, healthy living and well being should be encouraged. This can be as simple as having seniors participate in drill (if you have never done it, or are out of practice, it can be a bit of a challenge), or other incentive based programs with some structure to them.

My first year as a squadron commander, we had full squadron drill, and for the seniors we had a "biggest loser" type of program. Those that did not participate regretted that they did not.

Your point about the gyms is a good one. Check out your locality for municipal gyms. Lots of times they are free and go mostly unused. If the Scouts and local teams can use them as a group, no reason that CAP can't...

We still have HSO's.  They are tasked with such things, and it is a shame we don't take PT more seriously as senior members.  I agree with Winterg that CAP should take a larger role in promoting a healthier lifestyle for the entire membership.  Healthier members mean higher mission effectiveness.  But, we have corporate distinctive uniforms for a reason...

Report to moderator   Logged
Paul_AK
Member

Posts: 82

« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2015, 03:54:06 PM »

There are already so many requirements we place on our volunteers. I would be very apprehensive to add something else to that burden, even if it is a worthwhile cause like fitness.
Volunteer programs are a tricky thing to run. With an organization with such a varied membership base such as CAP, any additional burden might be cause to sever ties. Heck, even grooming standards fall by the wayside sometimes in order to retain qualified aircrews. If we can't add a full on PT program, perhaps something that is an incentive? I'm not sure if some fitness excellence medal/certificate/whatever with presentations being conducted at Wing or Region conferences would be successful but some form of enticement rather than an additional PD requirement might be the ticket, as winterg previously mentioned.

« Last Edit: December 30, 2015, 04:59:17 PM by Paul_AK » Report to moderator   Logged
Paul M. McBride
TSgt, 176 SFS, AKANG
1st Lt, AK CAP
        
Earhart #13376
Holding Pattern
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,333
Unit: Worry

« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2015, 04:42:02 PM »

Optional+recognition is the way to start, and possibly the way to stay.

I've always been more motivated by optional goals over mandatory requirements, personally.
Report to moderator   Logged
TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,689

« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2015, 06:32:28 PM »

While I'm in favor of a senior member fitness program, a key point of discussion is the fact have not just promoting physical fitness and healthy lifestyles for all members but having a fitness program that actually addresses how to stay physically fit and exercises to be evaluated (if there is a CPFT requirement for seniors).

One of the problems I do see from a policy standpoint is the fact that we are a volunteer corps that does not discriminate based on age or physical disabilities. It's very hard to provide a structured training program for adults who may have various physical limitations, if ever such a program was going to have some form of grading criteria (which doesn't seem to be the suggestion here). If it's a do-at-your-own-will fitness program designed for the typical adult male based on military standards, then I don't see why one can't be formulated. Many seniors already do PT alongside the cadets. Us smaller squadrons don't always have that luxury due to safety/observation limitations with our staff numbers, but there are some of us who do support it.
Report to moderator   Logged
SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,591
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2015, 08:19:34 PM »

The primary cause for obesity is eating too much. Until people learn to cut down on their food intake, they are going to be fat. This is what we need to encourage among the members, and society in general.
Report to moderator   Logged
Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
Brit_in_CAP
Seasoned Member

Posts: 399
Unit: MER-VA-002

« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2015, 08:24:46 PM »

This can be as simple as having seniors participate in drill (if you have never done it, or are out of practice, it can be a bit of a challenge),
>:D
I joined the cadets for drill this week......they are still laughing about it...!
We had a little 'lost in translation' problem when I was giving orders and, despite the best efforts of the C/CC, I *still* cannot About Face correctly.. :-[

Brought a smile or two, which was the point!
Report to moderator   Logged
TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,689

« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2015, 09:09:29 PM »

This can be as simple as having seniors participate in drill (if you have never done it, or are out of practice, it can be a bit of a challenge),
>:D
I joined the cadets for drill this week......they are still laughing about it...!
We had a little 'lost in translation' problem when I was giving orders and, despite the best efforts of the C/CC, I *still* cannot About Face correctly.. :-[

Brought a smile or two, which was the point!

I personally recommend that seniors do not learn drill with the cadets. Teach this separate, perhaps with the First Sergeant helping to teach seniors, but not in the cadet flight. Just my opinion, though.
Report to moderator   Logged
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,043

« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2015, 10:07:14 PM »

Not that seniors cannot learn to drill, but they do not need to be out drilling with cadets.  This is something that needs to be done with a senior who knows drill.  There isn't any unit anywhere that cant find a senior to teach drill.  Cadets do not need to be standing around giggling and essentially making fun of seniors because that's what happens.   As a former cadet myself I know how this looks from the eyes of a cadet.  As a former Senior who was a DCC and a Sq CC, I know how this looks from the eyes of the cadets and from the eyes of a senior who used to make fun of seniors as a cadet.  They go back and make fun of you!  They don't go back and say "Wow... Lt Smith is so awesome for trying to learn how to drill isn't he?  I really respect him for at least trying."

At a last resort, what was posted before, have the Seniors be taught by the cadet staff away from the rank and file cadets.  Be competent in your position and your skills. Be technically and tactically proficient but never place yourself in a position to be entertainment.  There is no leadership value in it.  If you have the desire to be proficient at drill, then learn it privately and perform when the need arises and learn it to the point where you are competent.  Otherwise, stay away from it if you cant commit to being at least as good as your cadet leadership.  You'll just make a fool out of yourself.  You wont be gaining any respect.  Drill is a huge part of a cadets life.  Cadets have an almost unrealistic view of drill as the determining factor for how they evaluate everything.  Its holy to them.   If you cant drill as a cadet, you are a lesser being.  Id say more so than a cadet who cant PT.  Don't dabble in their holy rite of passage and then think you will earn their respect by learning some facing and marching movements.  You are best to just stay away from it totally.  In 6 years as a cadet, 8 in the Infantry, 18 as a cop and now as an LE unit commander,  I cant recall anytime Ive ever gained respect for a leader or earned respect from my people because they made me laugh, or I made them laugh at my expense by displaying my humorous lack of knowledge.  Im not saying pretend to be something you are not.  What Im saying is don't go out of your way to display your deficiencies. 


(edit for spelling)
« Last Edit: December 30, 2015, 10:46:59 PM by Flying Pig » Report to moderator   Logged
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,043

« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2015, 10:15:56 PM »

As far as physical fitness.  its really a tough deal as a society.  People are not involved with CAP enough to have it really affect their daily physical fitness.  They are adults.   CAP has limited time and spending that time talking about nutrition is really a waste of time.  Heck.. in police work we have a yearly PFT and people fail that every year to the point of being terminated for repeated failures.  Im all for it, but its not something CAP needs to spend a lot of time on.  We have different uniforms, we have flight physicals, we have ground team physical fitness requirements to a point right?  For observers and aircrew.... we have Weight and Balance calculations >:D
Report to moderator   Logged
RiverAux
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 10,978

« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2015, 10:35:48 PM »

The standard CAP response to a perceived need is to produce some sort of award to encourage the desired activity.  So, a senior member fitness award, perhaps based on Presidents Challenge would be the way to go.

The mandatory aspect of it should relate to ground team member qualification.  Some sort of fitness requirement should absolutely be required of all members participating in that program. 
Report to moderator   Logged
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,043

« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2015, 10:38:15 PM »

The standard CAP response to a perceived need is to produce some sort of award to encourage the desired activity.  So, a senior member fitness award, perhaps based on Presidents Challenge would be the way to go.

The mandatory aspect of it should relate to ground team member qualification.  Some sort of fitness requirement should absolutely be required of all members participating in that program.

This is true.  But knowing humans.... I don't see a PFT award motivating much beyond just thinking about it.  If you aren't going to unsaddle your couch... a ribbon isn't going to motivate you.  But yes... an award is really about all CAP would be able to offer in the way of motivation. 
Report to moderator   Logged
dwb
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,347

« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2015, 11:11:16 PM »

Back to my earlier remark -- think of all the optional, nice-to-have programs we have today. So many squadrons can't even get the mandatory stuff right, much less entertain themselves with optional programs. Is the value provided by another nice-to-have incentive going to outweigh the cost of some OPR developing and maintaining that program, and the additional burden it puts on units that opt in?

I don't mean to rain on well-intentioned parades here. I agree fitness is important. I'm just thinking through the effort involved in creating and maintaining an opt-in program, which probably involves new publications (including cross-OPR and paid/volunteer coordination overhead), new tracking in eServices (with the requisite IT support), and another thing that struggling units look at and go "why are we spending time on this?"
Report to moderator   Logged
winterg
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 746
Unit: SER-FL-182

« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2015, 11:32:11 PM »

I don't see a need to create any new directorates or staff positions.  The mechanism is already in place in the President's Challenge program for members to track their progress.  Simply use it.  The President's Challenge is even set up to work with large organizations so tracking is not a burden.  The benefits are listed under the Advocate section.

-Recognition on our website and in our “Fitness is Fun” e-newsletter
-Easy-to-use online tools that encourage your target audience to increase their physical activity and earn awards
-Access to awards featuring the signature of the President of the United States
-Use of the President’s Challenge logo and materials
-Special portal page for advocates with 100 or more participants that will allow seamless registration for group members, no need to remember a group name or id number[/li][/list]

There are two programs applicable to adults.  The President's Active Lifestyle Award (PALA) that will help people add some physical fitness and healthy eating to their lives.  The second, Presidential Champions, has much higher requirements with 4 levels with medals, Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum.

No need to invent new awards either.  Why not utilize awards we already have?  If a member receives the Platinum award in the President's Challenge, they qualify to receive a CAP Achievement Medal.  Maybe award a Unit Citation if a majority of Senior Members in a unit receive the Platinum award.  Although that would reward all the members, even the ones that didn't participate.  But doesn't the Unit Citation do that already?

And while I am never a fan of self reporting, if a member claims to have earned 1 million points for the Platinum award and can't walk to the cooler without being out of breath, maybe some questions need to be asked.
Report to moderator   Logged
Shawn W.
Forum Regular

Posts: 102

« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2015, 01:34:00 AM »

Optional+recognition is the way to start, and possibly the way to stay.

I've always been more motivated by optional goals over mandatory requirements, personally.

+1 to Starflee Auxiliary. Also + 1 to WinterG. Make it optional for those who want to (I would defintly participate) and yes to awards and or recognition. Personally, I do better with fitness and exercise when I have a Battle Buddy also doing it with me v.s. alone.
Report to moderator   Logged
SAREXinNY
Forum Regular

Posts: 142
Unit: NER-NY

« Reply #18 on: December 31, 2015, 02:32:57 AM »

The DoD offers various competitions such as "Best Warrior" competition or "Best Ranger" competition. May CAP could have a "Best Group," "Best Wing," "Best Region," and "Best National" competitions for both cadets and SMs?  We already do similar competitions for drill, AE, etc.  Why not have a PT competition?
Report to moderator   Logged
SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,591
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #19 on: December 31, 2015, 02:34:49 AM »

The DoD offers various competitions such as "Best Warrior" competition or "Best Ranger" competition. May CAP could have a "Best Group," "Best Wing," "Best Region," and "Best National" competitions for both cadets and SMs?  We already do similar competitions for drill, AE, etc.  Why not have a PT competition?

Who is going to administer it?

Who is going to pay for it?
Report to moderator   Logged
Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 6 Send this topic Print 
CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  The Lobby  |  Topic: Senior Member Physical Fitness
 


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.14 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.066 seconds with 26 queries.