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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  The Lobby  |  Topic: Senior Member Physical Fitness
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Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,043

« Reply #40 on: December 31, 2015, 02:21:23 PM »

I did, however... recently join the US Masters Swim.  Yay me! :clap:

http://www.usms.org/

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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,591
Unit: Classified

« Reply #41 on: December 31, 2015, 02:22:51 PM »

There is a lot more to weight control than diet and exercise.  To think otherwise is to reveal your lack of education.  Why not worry about members mental health?  Oh, and what uniform would one wear for all of this?

Then enlighten us as to what else there is?

Sorry but diet and exercise are they key things to weight control and weight loss.  I am not a health nut by any means but nearly any Dr or expert in this category will tell you weight control and loss is mainly 80% diet and 20% exercise.  This is provided the person wants to exercise and eat healthy.
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Paul_AK
Member

Posts: 82
Unit: PCR-AK-011

« Reply #42 on: December 31, 2015, 02:58:56 PM »

There is a lot more to weight control than diet and exercise.  To think otherwise is to reveal your lack of education.  Why not worry about members mental health?  Oh, and what uniform would one wear for all of this?
While your point is valid, the issue appears to be far deeper and more cyclical.

http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html

https://www.wvdhhr.org/bph/oehp/obesity/section1.htm

http://www.noo.org.uk/uploads/doc/vid_10266_Obesity%20and%20mental%20health_FINAL_070311_MG.pdf


To quote Fat B. from Austin Powers, "I eat because I'm unhappy, I'm unhappy because I eat." Research has shown the benefits of exercise and proper diet in relation to both mental and physical health in abundance.

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2011/12/exercise.aspx

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1424736/

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/in-depth/depression-and-exercise/art-20046495

« Last Edit: December 31, 2015, 04:29:27 PM by Paul_AK » Logged
Paul McBride, 1st Lt, CAP
SSgt, 176 SFS, AK ANG
        
Earhart #13376
Stonewall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 3,934

« Reply #43 on: December 31, 2015, 04:23:33 PM »

As a CAP senior member with 29 years service, and age 43, I consider fitness to be an incredibly important part of my lifestyle.  For years I have kept a workout journal for personal use, but thought I'd share here, since this is about senior members and fitness.  That said, I do believe an active lifestyle is important for all Americans, but I don't necessarily think CAP seniors should be held to the same standard as the Air Force or cadets.  Remember, in its infancy, through today, CAP is a way for those who couldn't serve to still serve.  For whatever reason, some choose not to lead certain lifestyles, and that's really no ones business; with few exceptions.  Like operating on a ground team, perhaps certain levels of fitness or even a physical exam could be relevant, similar to a flight physical.

So, I am very proud to share my 2015 fitness stats.  Despite two ankle surgeries which caused me to lose almost three weeks of workout time, I still dragged myself to the gym or outside to keep myself as fit as possible.

Total # of workouts:  250

Average workouts per week: 5

Average minutes per workout: 69.5

Total hours spent working out:  289.7

Total miles (bike, swim, run, ruck, etc.):  1,137.25

Average miles per workout:  4.5

Total distance swam: 84,300 meters (52.4 miles)

Different gyms visited:  11 (not including outside workouts)

LA Fitness:  Woodbridge, Springfield, Alexandria, Atlantic Beach, Kernan

Military gyms:  Hurlburt Field, Andrews AFB, Lackland AFB, Scott AFB, Westover ARB, Ft. Belvoir
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goblin
Forum Regular

Posts: 177

« Reply #44 on: December 31, 2015, 04:41:06 PM »

Thanks for letting us know what military gyms you worked out at in 2015
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Stonewall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 3,934

« Reply #45 on: December 31, 2015, 04:44:37 PM »

I copied and pasted as I closed out my 2015 journal.  Secured and not to be reopened.
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,470
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #46 on: January 01, 2016, 01:50:20 AM »

There is a lot more to weight control than diet and exercise.  To think otherwise is to reveal your lack of education.  Why not worry about members mental health?  Oh, and what uniform would one wear for all of this?

Then enlighten us as to what else there is?

Sorry but diet and exercise are they key things to weight control and weight loss.  I am not a health nut by any means but nearly any Dr or expert in this category will tell you weight control and loss is mainly 80% diet and 20% exercise.  This is provided the person wants to exercise and eat healthy.

This is exactly what my doctors (four of them) have told me over the last three or four years. I control my weight almost exclusively through diet. I eat less of everything, and cut way back on the munchies.

Portion control is a significant part of the process. We buy the boxes of single portions of chips and other munchies, so there's little tendency to pig out and make a big bag of something into just three or four portions, instead of the intended twelve or so. The same goes for sodas - buy smaller cans or bottles. And so it goes.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
Garibaldi
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,323
Unit: SER-GA-045

Sandy Springs Cadet Squadron
« Reply #47 on: January 01, 2016, 09:05:52 AM »

There is a lot more to weight control than diet and exercise.  To think otherwise is to reveal your lack of education.  Why not worry about members mental health?  Oh, and what uniform would one wear for all of this?

Then enlighten us as to what else there is?

Sorry but diet and exercise are they key things to weight control and weight loss.  I am not a health nut by any means but nearly any Dr or expert in this category will tell you weight control and loss is mainly 80% diet and 20% exercise.  This is provided the person wants to exercise and eat healthy.

This is exactly what my doctors (four of them) have told me over the last three or four years. I control my weight almost exclusively through diet. I eat less of everything, and cut way back on the munchies.

Portion control is a significant part of the process. We buy the boxes of single portions of chips and other munchies, so there's little tendency to pig out and make a big bag of something into just three or four portions, instead of the intended twelve or so. The same goes for sodas - buy smaller cans or bottles. And so it goes.

Portion control is significant, yes. I've found that cutting out sodas altogether, even diet, and staying away from anything with massive amounts of sugar, helps. Reducing the amount of bread, starches, anything  that "sticks to your ribs". Maintaining a schedule for meals. Very little snacking, and when you do, eat an apple or a banana or other fruit.
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You can't take the sky from me. Also, I can kill you with my brain. No power in the 'verse can stop me.
LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,845
Unit: Earth

« Reply #48 on: January 01, 2016, 05:36:15 PM »

I will keep this brief as I am typing on my phone.

Genetics do play a role in obseity, but so does diet and fitness.  There have been at least 40 different genes that are involved in obseity. These range from storage of fat to the compulsive overeating. The most "famous" is a mutation in the leptin gene. How those genes play a role in obseity is complex as it involves mutations, epigenetics, and hereditary as well as evolution.

The real question is how much of a role do they play?  A person is simply predisposed to obseity by having these biomarkers, but it does not necessarily make one obese.  Having calorie dense foods and lack of activity is what causes obseity the vast manority of the time. There are a few other diseases and drugs that do as well even if one is active and eats right. 

A person that is genetically predisposed to obesity cannot say that is why they are obese. They are obese be ause of their dist and activity. Of course that being said, it make it more difficult to loose weight but not impossible. These people need to understand that it will take more activity and longer time to loss the weight than other people, which of course is the reason for failure ofmost weight loss diets and programs.
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1st Lt Thompson
Seasoned Member

Posts: 355
Unit: GLR-MI-063

« Reply #49 on: January 01, 2016, 06:24:17 PM »

No it shouldn't a volunteer non profit org has no business trying to dictate members lifestyles and has no business in our doctrine.  There is very little benefit to CAP trying to do anything you have suggested.

There are a lot of benefits to CAP to have a healthier, more physically fit, more mentally alert volunteer force, and to think otherwise is obsurd.

Can a group of 400 pound GTL/GTM's hike 6 miles into the woods, and carry a casualty back out on a litter, without becoming a liability themselves? Maybe, but probably not.

Can a 400 pound pilot, 400 pound observer and 400 pound scanner cram into a 172 and get off the ground to fly missions? Not with fuel in the tank.

While we certainly can't mandate PT for seniors, the benefits of a fitness/nutrition education program would be numerous. I hate to mention Hawk here, because I know it will spark lots of negativity, but for the Ranger grades, even Seniors have PT requirements. We would probably never require PT for GTM levels, but adding education to the curriculum couldn't hurt.
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1st Lt Matt Thompson
Squadron Leadership Officer, Squadron Historian
UDF, GTM3, MSA, MS

Mitchell - 31 OCT 98 (#44670) Earhart - 22 MAY 01 (#11401)
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,316

« Reply #50 on: January 01, 2016, 07:15:29 PM »

Can a group of 400 pound GTL/GTM's hike 6 miles into the woods, and carry a casualty back out on a litter, without becoming a liability themselves? Maybe, but probably not.

Yeah, when was the last time that a CAP "Ground Team" actually did something like this?

We're not equipped or even trained for this. If we have to evacuate a causality, we call the "professionals" who have much better equipment and training to do the job.
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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,591
Unit: Classified

« Reply #51 on: January 01, 2016, 08:05:50 PM »

There is no added benefiet to the org trying to teach the adult members about healthy lifestyles.  What is the org going to teach/present that hasn't been covered by a Dr or someone else?

BLUF if senior member want and choose to live a healthy lifestyle they will you can not force them to do so and trying to brow beat with regurgitated information will fall on deaf ears.  This is akin to everyone in the AF who oh so dearly wants every to score a 90 or better on the PT test like something oh so magical is going to happen. 
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Sapper168
Seasoned Member

Posts: 336
Unit: GLR-IL-036

« Reply #52 on: January 02, 2016, 12:37:59 AM »

The primary cause for obesity is eating too much. Until people learn to cut down on their food intake, they are going to be fat. This is what we need to encourage among the members, and society in general.

I would strongly argue that it isn't eating too much, but, what you are eating that causes obesity.
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Shane E Guernsey, TSgt, CAP
CAP Squadron ESO/CDC... "Who did what now?"
CAP Group NCO Advisor... "Where is the coffee located?"
US Army 12B... "Sappers Lead the Way!"
US Army Reserve 71L-f5... "Going Postal!"
Holding Pattern
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,288
Unit: Worry

« Reply #53 on: January 02, 2016, 12:53:40 AM »

Can a group of 400 pound GTL/GTM's hike 6 miles into the woods, and carry a casualty back out on a litter, without becoming a liability themselves? Maybe, but probably not.

Yeah, when was the last time that a CAP "Ground Team" actually did something like this?

We're not equipped or even trained for this. If we have to evacuate a causality, we call the "professionals" who have much better equipment and training to do the job.

Seems we used to do this... what changed?
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arajca
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,301

« Reply #54 on: January 02, 2016, 01:31:06 AM »

Can a group of 400 pound GTL/GTM's hike 6 miles into the woods, and carry a casualty back out on a litter, without becoming a liability themselves? Maybe, but probably not.

Yeah, when was the last time that a CAP "Ground Team" actually did something like this?

We're not equipped or even trained for this. If we have to evacuate a causality, we call the "professionals" who have much better equipment and training to do the job.


Seems we used to do this... what changed?
1. Proliferation of local rescue teams who are much easier to call out.
2. Lawyers.
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,470
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #55 on: January 02, 2016, 01:42:23 AM »

The primary cause for obesity is eating too much. Until people learn to cut down on their food intake, they are going to be fat. This is what we need to encourage among the members, and society in general.

I would strongly argue that it isn't eating too much, but, what you are eating that causes obesity.

I eat anything I want. Anything. Pizza. Donuts. Chips. Quarter pounders. And healthy stuff, too. I weigh 178 pounds, and am 5'10" tall. It's all about quantity.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
Holding Pattern
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,288
Unit: Worry

« Reply #56 on: January 02, 2016, 01:43:03 AM »

Can a group of 400 pound GTL/GTM's hike 6 miles into the woods, and carry a casualty back out on a litter, without becoming a liability themselves? Maybe, but probably not.

Yeah, when was the last time that a CAP "Ground Team" actually did something like this?

We're not equipped or even trained for this. If we have to evacuate a causality, we call the "professionals" who have much better equipment and training to do the job.


Seems we used to do this... what changed?
1. Proliferation of local rescue teams who are much easier to call out.
2. Lawyers.

What are the solutions to these problems?
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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,591
Unit: Classified

« Reply #57 on: January 02, 2016, 02:00:06 AM »

Can a group of 400 pound GTL/GTM's hike 6 miles into the woods, and carry a casualty back out on a litter, without becoming a liability themselves? Maybe, but probably not.

Yeah, when was the last time that a CAP "Ground Team" actually did something like this?

We're not equipped or even trained for this. If we have to evacuate a causality, we call the "professionals" who have much better equipment and training to do the job.


Seems we used to do this... what changed?
1. Proliferation of local rescue teams who are much easier to call out.
2. Lawyers.

What are the solutions to these problems?

You willing to take the fiscal responsibility?
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Fubar
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 737

« Reply #58 on: January 02, 2016, 02:23:30 AM »

What are the solutions to these problems?

Wow, a thread jack that doesn't lead to uniforms.

Public safety folks take the path of least resistance when it comes to solving whatever issue is in front of them. In this case, most areas (but certainly not all) have ground SAR solutions that are easier to mobilize and control than CAP. Either in-house teams which offer the lead agency full control of the assets to external teams that fully integrate into ICS, instead of CAP's requirement that CAP be in full control over all assets. Combine that with our limited abilities (by regulation) and having children on our teams, it's unlikely our utilization will change.

So the solutions?

  • Fully integrate ground teams into the ICS structure
  • Remove minors from ground teams
  • Train to national standards, which includes technical rescues and medical training
  • Actually perform to the advertised capability

By no means is this impossible, but highly unlikely without a top-down philosophy change. Additionally, if by some miracle CAP decided to be a major player in ground SAR, physical fitness requirements for GTM certifications would not be inappropriate. Volunteer firefighters have physical fitness requirements (at least initially to get on the dept), there's no discrimination in CAP expecting volunteers in the field to be physically capable of fulling their tasks.
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LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,845
Unit: Earth

« Reply #59 on: January 02, 2016, 02:28:21 AM »

The primary cause for obesity is eating too much. Until people learn to cut down on their food intake, they are going to be fat. This is what we need to encourage among the members, and society in general.

I would strongly argue that it isn't eating too much, but, what you are eating that causes obesity.

I eat anything I want. Anything. Pizza. Donuts. Chips. Quarter pounders. And healthy stuff, too. I weigh 178 pounds, and am 5'10" tall. It's all about quantity.

It is all about quantity for you.  For others, it is about what.  For others, it is about what and quantity.  For others, it is about activity.  For others, it is about what, quantity, and activity.  For others, it is about something different.  As I said, subpopulations of humans are predisposed by biomarkers.  What may work for one subpopulation does not necessarily work for another subpopulation.
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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  The Lobby  |  Topic: Senior Member Physical Fitness
 


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