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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Membership  |  Topic: Why are Cadet Crossover Members so Rare?
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Author Topic: Why are Cadet Crossover Members so Rare?  (Read 15101 times)
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,422

« Reply #40 on: October 15, 2012, 07:22:26 PM »

Dave always had Canada.  >:D

But speaking of the draft...I had to sign up for the selective service or I wouldn't get my citizenship, yet it seems almost none of my friends have signed up and yet are still not in jail...what gives?

Yeah, but they can't get stuff like Pell Grants or Federal Student Loans.

Or at least they're not supposed to be able to get them if they haven't registered.




And your Canada joke is not even close to being funny... >:(
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,559
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #41 on: October 15, 2012, 08:18:11 PM »

Dave always had Canada.  >:D

But speaking of the draft...I had to sign up for the selective service or I wouldn't get my citizenship, yet it seems almost none of my friends have signed up and yet are still not in jail...what gives?

If I had gone to Canada, my dad would have been the first one to rat me out. It simply was not an option.

As for signing up, there isn't an aggressive effort to chase these folks down. What usually happens is that they get nabbed when they try to get a benefit somewhere else and their name pops up as not having registered.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
Майор Хаткевич
200,000th Post Author
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Posts: 6,062
Unit: GLR-IL-049

« Reply #42 on: October 15, 2012, 08:57:30 PM »

I know for a fact they got Pell grants...which is why I was surprised.

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RiverAux
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 10,977

« Reply #43 on: October 15, 2012, 10:19:35 PM »

Probably just have to say that they registered.  Doubt that they check. 
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hotoppb
Recruit

Posts: 15
Unit: NHQ 113

« Reply #44 on: October 26, 2012, 07:45:14 AM »

i got out and joined the Air Force.
Saw a local squadron at my tech school and decided to join again.
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FW
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,185

« Reply #45 on: October 26, 2012, 11:26:56 AM »

By the time I reached college, I went thru the cadet program and had nothing more to gain.  I did join up with a local squadron however, I wasn't allowed to officially transfer to this unit (my home unit didn't want to lose a prospective Spaatz cadet).  This actually soured my attempts to stay.  Then again, my interests changed and, I was moving on. CAP already gave me the tools needed to be successful and; I did.  After 10 years of learning, establishing myself and, starting a family; I felt a need to "give back".  I rejoined my old unit and, for the next 30 years, had a great time. 
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Smith
Newbie

Posts: 4
Unit: PCR-CA-273

« Reply #46 on: November 05, 2012, 09:35:53 PM »

I honestly believe there are few crossovers because to some degree, though we may not like to think so, most cadets only care about their success and recognition and then move on after their cadet experience thinking they "have learned everything and gotten everything out of CAP."

I, on the other hand, truly cared about teaching and helping others succeed and progress, which is why I did not promote as much as a cadet (Earhart). It is also why I also transitioned to SM after turning 21.

The squadron had many "great" cadets who did all these things and were "good examples," but now the squadron suffers and is about to suffer more because those great cadets did not teach their predecessors or pass on their "knowledge" and the junior cadets do not know what to do because others did it for them.

Sp, I guess what I'm trying to say, and kind of failing at, is that the program itself is not pushing the importance or teamwork, helping each other, and putting others before yourself, and most importantly leadership. Successful leaders care about the people under them and their successes. I've learned that by the success that my followers achieve, the more I benefit. I have seen lately that the focus is more on self satisfaction.

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AngelWings
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,285

« Reply #47 on: November 06, 2012, 01:39:06 AM »

CAP is like an electric bull. You ride it for the fun, and it kicks you off, and sometimes you decide to get right back and some times you decide it is not as fun anymore. Just like anything else in life.

I know if I have kids, I want them to join CAP at least for a few meetings. I give CAP full credit for making me the person I am today, giving me my best hours, and giving me the strength to keep my head up in the face of adversity. CAP is a life saver for young men and women such as myself, but I am not sure of its ability to be as impacting as Senior Member.

I will also go and say admitingly is that I am both young and things may change drastically within two years time and I could re-up with no regrets, keeping active. I am also unable to clearly see into my future with CAP considering how things are with the organization, but I believe CAP will never leave me for as long as I live. Some parts of growing up are realizing things that used to mean so much to you don't any longer. Hell, I used to want to do a bunch of crazy things when I was really young that I cannot stand now.

I would like to also note that everyone who thinks their role in CAP is unimportant, you are dead wrong. I want to be with a family of decent men and women. Each and every member of CAP makes CAP what it is. You're all very important, more important than wing commanders, the national commander, or any other high ranking CAP member. You're all part of a team, and one thing I've learned is that what makes me take another day of physical (and economical) punishment with CAP is the people I spend my time with.

I've met some really awesome people who I hope I'll know for the rest of my life. All of you are instrumental to the retention of young kids like me. I love having people who I both relate to and can feel are on my team.
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umpirecali
Forum Regular

Posts: 102
Unit: MER-VA-060

« Reply #48 on: November 12, 2012, 04:14:52 AM »


Most 20 year olds in college have many miles to travel before they will be taken seriously by most adults.  Having to make your own way, write monthly checks, and being responsible for other people's well-being will bring you the authority of experience that college and the WSJ can't.

I think attitudes and expectations towards our young people are part of the problem.  You said it yourself, "most 20 years olds...before they will be taken seriously by adults", so you don't consider a 20 year old an adult.  When we (collective we) don't treat them like adults and give the adult responsibilities, we perpetuate the problem.  I was a youth pastor and when they became too old to be in the youth program, I treated them as equals.  I look at young SM's they same way.  If a 19 yr old TFO senses that you view them as a child, then they won't want to be around you. Now, I understand the progression of life experience, and maturity separates several levels of adults and depending on the person, the age will vary.  I know irresponsible 28 yr olds that live at home and work at Starbucks (my brother-in-law) and I know a mature 18 year old who started his own business when he was 16.  What we put them in charge of isn't a function of age but proven track record. 

As others have said, most 20-something's have other priorities as I did at that age and I think that accounts for why so few crossovers, however I treat a FO no different than a white hair.
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Capt Chris Cali, CAP
Deputy Commander for Seniors
Safety Officer
Emergency Service Training Officer
FDLT19
Recruit

Posts: 14

« Reply #49 on: December 09, 2012, 09:34:56 PM »

I know in my case I made every attempt to work as a senior member after the dreaded 21 forced change over, believe me it was like pulling teeth to give up being a cadet. 

After becoming a senior member a few things happened that “forced” me to put CAP on the back burner. 

The first was college, when I became a senior member I was already elbow deep in college, and taking on task as a senior member became a increasing challenge, as  I was to busy studying, and other “college” related activities. 

Second, was the eye opening relaxed atmosphere that was being a senior member, i.e. relaxed military C/C, etc.

Third, and probably having the most impact on my separation, was this girl I met and then decided to throw large amounts of money at, who then produced other people at whom I have had to throw even larger amounts of money at.

Finally after finishing college, I became a firefighter, and had family, and focused on my career. 

I have now come full circle and am in the position where my son wants, and I would like for him, to join.  I will foster this; however, I do no know if this is something I need to let him do for him self or join now and experience it from this side with him. 
« Last Edit: December 09, 2012, 10:41:38 PM by FDLT19 » Logged
umpirecali
Forum Regular

Posts: 102
Unit: MER-VA-060

« Reply #50 on: December 10, 2012, 09:55:58 AM »

We had an 18 year old last week become a SM after being a C/Capt.  Time will tell how involved in the dark side he gets.
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Capt Chris Cali, CAP
Deputy Commander for Seniors
Safety Officer
Emergency Service Training Officer
SARDOC
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Posts: 1,432

« Reply #51 on: December 10, 2012, 02:33:00 PM »

Dave always had Canada.  >:D

But speaking of the draft...I had to sign up for the selective service or I wouldn't get my citizenship, yet it seems almost none of my friends have signed up and yet are still not in jail...what gives?

Yeah, but they can't get stuff like Pell Grants or Federal Student Loans.

Or at least they're not supposed to be able to get them if they haven't registered.




And your Canada joke is not even close to being funny... >:(

They can't get security clearances.
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 29,527

« Reply #52 on: December 10, 2012, 02:45:03 PM »

...so you don't consider a 20 year old an adult.


Nope.
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Texas Raiders
Member

Posts: 92
Unit: NER-CT-042

« Reply #53 on: December 10, 2012, 03:30:02 PM »

I was a very active cadet until I turned 18 and joined the military.  I rolled over to the senior program with my squadron.  Ultimately, I fell inactive as my military duty station was over 300 miles from my hometown and my squadron.  My priorities changed and were focused upon my military career.  I served for twelve years and then my career intentions changed and I became a career firefighter/EMT.  Until recently, I had no intentions of rejoining.  There was small private aircraft that went down near Simsbury, CT a while back.  I immediately thought of CAP and whether or not they'd be utilized (they were).  This incident refreshed my interest in CAP, motivated me to find a squadron, and attend some meetings.  Needless to say, I'm back.   

I think I'll be a better senior member because of my time away.  Over the years, I have become a mature adult and have gained a wealth of knowledge and experience along the way.  I don't think I would have been a good senior member if I had stuck around before. 
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SM Randy Patterson
DPO
399th Comp. Squadron,  Danbury, CT "Yankee Hatters"
IAFF Local 1567
USCG- 1998-2010   Boatswain's Mate
Former member of the old 273rd/ Mid-County Composite Squadron, Nederland, Texas- 1994-2000
FDLT19
Recruit

Posts: 14

« Reply #54 on: December 10, 2012, 04:04:41 PM »

I agree with eclipse about twenty year olds.  Now at 20 I would argued diffrent, 37 not so much.
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a2capt
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« Reply #55 on: December 10, 2012, 05:35:08 PM »

I've had experiences with Cadets turn Senior that just can't separate themselves and in fact, become advocates and enablers for cadets .. when some cadets are ripe for pushing the envelope.

When you have comments like "We like SM XXXX (substitute up to Capt.), he lets us do things the other senior members won't..)

Nothing good can come of that.
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Майор Хаткевич
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Unit: GLR-IL-049

« Reply #56 on: December 10, 2012, 06:06:32 PM »

I've had experiences with Cadets turn Senior that just can't separate themselves and in fact, become advocates and enablers for cadets .. when some cadets are ripe for pushing the envelope.

When you have comments like "We like SM XXXX (substitute up to Capt.), he lets us do things the other senior members won't..)

Nothing good can come of that.

That probably means that SM/Lt/Capt XXXX needs some training. Did anyone talk to them about the role of SMs?

I didn't get a talk like that (I did read a few transition/welcome guides however), but I've been operating under the model of "if I wasn't allowed to do it, they aren't allowed to do it either" and "Yea it sounds cool, but I can see it turning ugly quick". Hasn't failed me yet.
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umpirecali
Forum Regular

Posts: 102
Unit: MER-VA-060

« Reply #57 on: December 10, 2012, 10:16:12 PM »

...so you don't consider a 20 year old an adult.


Nope.

Would you say that in front of a bunch AD SrA's and SSgt's?
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Capt Chris Cali, CAP
Deputy Commander for Seniors
Safety Officer
Emergency Service Training Officer
Майор Хаткевич
200,000th Post Author
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,062
Unit: GLR-IL-049

« Reply #58 on: December 10, 2012, 10:38:19 PM »

Probably would. I don't agree with the viewpoint (I'm 22), but I see what they are getting at. My 22 year old self would smack my 18 year old self.
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,559
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #59 on: December 10, 2012, 10:39:44 PM »

...so you don't consider a 20 year old an adult.


Nope.

Would you say that in front of a bunch AD SrA's and SSgt's?

Depends on time frame. When I was around that age, in an essentially peacetime environment, definitely. Today, with all the young'uns who have been deployed at least once by their 20th birthday, maybe not. But there are still many 20 year olds in the military noticeably lacking maturity. In that case, they still aren't quite adults.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Membership  |  Topic: Why are Cadet Crossover Members so Rare?
 


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