August 14, 2020, 12:46:45 am

Key Traits for SM Programs

Started by Holding Pattern, February 17, 2020, 04:48:20 am

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Holding Pattern

The Cadet program in 60-1 identifies the following key triats of cadet life:
Quote1.6. KEY TRAITS OF CADET LIFE
Five key traits of cadet life inform commanders of the desired look and feel of cadet activities and how they should conduct the Cadet Program.

1.6.1. The Uniform. CAP promotes teamwork and high standards of personal conduct through the cadets being granted the privilege of wearing an Air Force-style uniform. The uniform and the related traditions of rendering military customs and courtesies distinguish cadets from ordinary youth. These military aspects of cadet life are important motivators. Every activity should allow cadets to wear their uniform and properly render military customs and courtesies.

1.6.2. Aerospace Theme. CAP members often hold in common a love of flying. Aviation is the thread that runs through all three CAP missions, and CAP's affiliation with the Air Force underscores its identity as an air-minded organization. Whenever possible, every cadet activity should further cadets' enthusiasm for aerospace, as "aerospace" is broadly understood. With a little imagination, even fitness and character activities can be shown to have an aerospace connection.

1.6.3. Opportunity to Lead. CAP develops leadership skills in cadets by giving them opportunities to lead. This includes planning events, making decisions, and teaching and mentoring junior-ranking cadets, commensurate with their developmental progress and grade. The cadets' grade structure and military-style chain of command reinforces this leadership concept. Every activity should allow cadets opportunities to lead, under adult leader supervision.

1.6.4. Challenge. CAP challenges youth. It might be the physical challenge of conquering an obstacle course, an academic challenge to master aerospace and leadership concepts, a moral challenge to live the Core Values, or a personal challenge to know oneself better and gain self-confidence. Because of these challenges, the Cadet Program is intended for young adults, not children. Every activity should challenge cadets in one way or another.

1.6.5. Fun. CAP should be fun. New friends and great opportunities are the hallmarks of cadet life. The cadets who work hard in CAP reap the most benefits, but the program should not be another form of school - it needs to be fun, hands-on, rewarding, and exciting. Proper adult supervision, an emphasis on risk management, and teamwork built upon mutual respect create a safe and fun environment. Every activity should be fun, for cadets and their adult leaders alike.

With this in mind, what should the key traits of an ideal SM program look like?

TheSkyHornet

I'll answer a question with a question:
Why are senior members in CAP?

The Cadet Program is pretty cut-and-dry as to its intent: it's a leadership program built around an Air Force/aerospace theme with opportunities for emergency services training/involvement. Every cadet is supposed to have the same opportunity, with a flexible, dynamic training environment based on one's locale, local culture, and support network.

The "Senior Member Program" (which isn't really a thing) is a sandbox mode training and operational arena.

catrulz

Okay this my adjusted verbiage from the cadet statement:

KEY TRAITS OF SENIOR MEMBER SERVICE
Five key traits of Senior Member Service provide command, staff and operational operators and managers.  The Senior Member Program should be supervised training program that develops the program leaders of the future.

1. The Uniform. CAP promotes a professional corporate and military image both internally and to external agencies.  Adherence to proper uniform and appropriate grooming standards, provide an example to our subordinates, peers and cadets. The uniform and the related traditions of rendering military customs and courtesies distinguish CAP members, and demonstrate respect and professionalism.

2. Operational Theme. CAP members often hold an interest of flying, communicating and assisting those in distress.  CAP's affiliation with the Air Force underscores its identity as an air-minded organization.  Many CAP members are HAM radio operators, and CERT team members.  Senior Members are encouraged to assist in operational activities, that either help the community, state and nation or the organization. 

3. Opportunity to Lead. CAP develops leadership, managerial and staff skills. This includes planning events, making decisions, and teaching and mentoring staff and subordinates, commensurate with their developmental progress.  The military-style chain of command reinforces this leadership and staff concept. Membership should afford all members the opportunity to command, lead, advise, and assist.

4. Challenge. CAP challenges adult members.  CAP expects the Senior Membership to provide supervision, mentoring and example to both the cadet membership, and new Senior Members.  Challenges include but are not limited to:  Accepting and learning a work assignment at the unit level,   living the Core Values, give freely of your time, experience.  The biggest challenge of all, is too discipline yourself to accept orders from your leaders, operate with the regulation of the corporations, and be a team player.

5. Fun. CAP should be fun. New friends and great opportunities are the hallmarks of Adult Member life. The Senior Members who work and train hard in CAP reap the most benefits, second unpaid full time job.  CAP needs to be fun, hands-on, rewarding, and exciting.  Proper adult training, mentorship, command guidance, and personal motivation with an emphasis on risk management, and teamwork built upon mutual respect create a safe and fun environment. Every activity should be fun, for cadets and their adult leaders alike.

I don't believe SM key traits should be greatly different from the cadets, but motivations and expectations should be radically different.

Eclipse

1.6 - It's not about you.

1.7 - Don't waste people's time.

1.8 - It's not about you.

1.9 - Act like adults.

2.0 - In times of conflict misunderstandings see 1.6.



Holding Pattern

Quote from: Eclipse on February 17, 2020, 04:45:12 pm1.7 - Don't waste people's time.


This is covered in more flowery language in CAPR 1-2:
Quote from: CAPR 1-25. Relevance, Efficiency and Sustainability. All directive publications or revisions thereof, to include prescribed forms, should be mindful of any additional administrative burden to CAP volunteers or employees. Therefore, OPRs must consider relevance, efficiency and sustainability of directive requirements when developing regulations, supplements and OIs.

etodd

Quote from: catrulz on February 17, 2020, 04:31:11 pmOkay this my adjusted verbiage from the cadet statement:

KEY TRAITS OF SENIOR MEMBER SERVICE
Five key traits of Senior Member Service provide command, staff and operational operators and managers.  The Senior Member Program should be supervised training program that develops the program leaders of the future.

1. The Uniform. CAP promotes a professional corporate and military image both internally and to external agencies.  Adherence to proper uniform and appropriate grooming standards, provide an example to our subordinates, peers and cadets. The uniform and the related traditions of rendering military customs and courtesies distinguish CAP members, and demonstrate respect and professionalism.

2. Operational Theme. CAP members often hold an interest of flying, communicating and assisting those in distress.  CAP's affiliation with the Air Force underscores its identity as an air-minded organization.  Many CAP members are HAM radio operators, and CERT team members.  Senior Members are encouraged to assist in operational activities, that either help the community, state and nation or the organization. 

3. Opportunity to Lead. CAP develops leadership, managerial and staff skills. This includes planning events, making decisions, and teaching and mentoring staff and subordinates, commensurate with their developmental progress.  The military-style chain of command reinforces this leadership and staff concept. Membership should afford all members the opportunity to command, lead, advise, and assist.

4. Challenge. CAP challenges adult members.  CAP expects the Senior Membership to provide supervision, mentoring and example to both the cadet membership, and new Senior Members.  Challenges include but are not limited to:  Accepting and learning a work assignment at the unit level,   living the Core Values, give freely of your time, experience.  The biggest challenge of all, is too discipline yourself to accept orders from your leaders, operate with the regulation of the corporations, and be a team player.

5. Fun. CAP should be fun. New friends and great opportunities are the hallmarks of Adult Member life. The Senior Members who work and train hard in CAP reap the most benefits, second unpaid full time job.  CAP needs to be fun, hands-on, rewarding, and exciting.  Proper adult training, mentorship, command guidance, and personal motivation with an emphasis on risk management, and teamwork built upon mutual respect create a safe and fun environment. Every activity should be fun, for cadets and their adult leaders alike.

I don't believe SM key traits should be greatly different from the cadets, but motivations and expectations should be radically different.

Some Seniors may want to do all the above.  But many just want to find their niche, and try to excel at the job they like.  Cadets have a tract to follow, which encompasses many areas of exposure for them. The Seniors have jobs. Many just want to keep it simple. Just wear their polo, be a AP, MP PAO, etc., and don't care about rising up to be Commander one day.
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

Fester

Quote from: etodd on February 17, 2020, 05:17:15 pm
Quote from: catrulz on February 17, 2020, 04:31:11 pmOkay this my adjusted verbiage from the cadet statement:

KEY TRAITS OF SENIOR MEMBER SERVICE
Five key traits of Senior Member Service provide command, staff and operational operators and managers.  The Senior Member Program should be supervised training program that develops the program leaders of the future.

1. The Uniform. CAP promotes a professional corporate and military image both internally and to external agencies.  Adherence to proper uniform and appropriate grooming standards, provide an example to our subordinates, peers and cadets. The uniform and the related traditions of rendering military customs and courtesies distinguish CAP members, and demonstrate respect and professionalism.

2. Operational Theme. CAP members often hold an interest of flying, communicating and assisting those in distress.  CAP's affiliation with the Air Force underscores its identity as an air-minded organization.  Many CAP members are HAM radio operators, and CERT team members.  Senior Members are encouraged to assist in operational activities, that either help the community, state and nation or the organization. 

3. Opportunity to Lead. CAP develops leadership, managerial and staff skills. This includes planning events, making decisions, and teaching and mentoring staff and subordinates, commensurate with their developmental progress.  The military-style chain of command reinforces this leadership and staff concept. Membership should afford all members the opportunity to command, lead, advise, and assist.

4. Challenge. CAP challenges adult members.  CAP expects the Senior Membership to provide supervision, mentoring and example to both the cadet membership, and new Senior Members.  Challenges include but are not limited to:  Accepting and learning a work assignment at the unit level,   living the Core Values, give freely of your time, experience.  The biggest challenge of all, is too discipline yourself to accept orders from your leaders, operate with the regulation of the corporations, and be a team player.

5. Fun. CAP should be fun. New friends and great opportunities are the hallmarks of Adult Member life. The Senior Members who work and train hard in CAP reap the most benefits, second unpaid full time job.  CAP needs to be fun, hands-on, rewarding, and exciting.  Proper adult training, mentorship, command guidance, and personal motivation with an emphasis on risk management, and teamwork built upon mutual respect create a safe and fun environment. Every activity should be fun, for cadets and their adult leaders alike.

I don't believe SM key traits should be greatly different from the cadets, but motivations and expectations should be radically different.

Some Seniors may want to do all the above.  But many just want to find their niche, and try to excel at the job they like.  Cadets have a tract to follow, which encompasses many areas of exposure for them. The Seniors have jobs. Many just want to keep it simple. Just wear their polo, be a AP, MP PAO, etc., and don't care about rising up to be Commander one day.

Sounds like all of that is "I like the status quo and don't want to learn and grow."  Which leads to complacency. 
1stLt, CAP
Squadron CC
Group CPO
Eaker - 1996

TheSkyHornet

Quote from: Fester on February 18, 2020, 06:40:08 am
Quote from: etodd on February 17, 2020, 05:17:15 pmSome Seniors may want to do all the above.  But many just want to find their niche, and try to excel at the job they like.  Cadets have a tract to follow, which encompasses many areas of exposure for them. The Seniors have jobs. Many just want to keep it simple. Just wear their polo, be a AP, MP PAO, etc., and don't care about rising up to be Commander one day.

Sounds like all of that is "I like the status quo and don't want to learn and grow."  Which leads to complacency. 

A number of senior members are comfortably complacent and want to stay in a niche area for the duration of their time in CAP. There are pilots who want to do nothing but fly O-Flights; no command duties or involvement in non-flying activities. There are ground team members that solely want to stomp dirt. There are aerospace officers who just want to teach AE labs.

Seniors are not bound by constraints of how much they want to get involved in. Cadets, however, have contact hours that must be met in their prescribed areas: aerospace, leadership, fitness, and character. Within the leadership program element, it includes drill and uniform wear. This is a direct driver to the key cadet life trait regarding wear of the uniform.

The Key Traits of Cadet Life are complementary to the Program Elements of the Cadet Program.

So the Key Traits of Senior Membership should be complementary to the Program Elements of the "Senior Program." The issue in this is that there is no Senior Program.

etodd

Quote from: Fester on February 18, 2020, 06:40:08 amSounds like all of that is "I like the status quo and don't want to learn and grow."  Which leads to complacency. 

Quite the opposite.  In the many areas I am involved in, I'm constantly learning, growing and improving skill sets.  Just because I'm not interested in your area, does not equal complacency at all.

Too many confuse growth, with getting new ribbons and bars.  For some people it is, for others its not.

As had been said, their really is no Senior Program that mirrors Cadets. Its totally different. Its up to each individual to find what interest them and to work at it. Its our diversity of interests that makes us strong. :)

MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

Eclipse

Quote from: etodd on February 18, 2020, 07:52:10 pmAs had been said, their really is no Senior Program that mirrors Cadets.

Which is probably the core of the issues CAP has today, namely attempting
to mirror a military organizaiton and augment ES response agencies while
essentially requiring no training or participation, per se, coupled with little oversight or little ramifications for lack of execution.

"Come as you are / do as you please" is no way to run an organization like CAP.



TheSkyHornet

Quote from: etodd on February 18, 2020, 07:52:10 pmAs had been said, their really is no Senior Program that mirrors Cadets. Its totally different. Its up to each individual to find what interest them and to work at it. Its our diversity of interests that makes us strong.

Well, and this really only applies because of the fact that we're a "wide berth" volunteer organization that has numerous mission focuses. It's not like we all do the same thing.

As someone who works almost exclusively in Cadet Programs, I really don't need to be strapped into the middle of Ground Team whatevers. The leadership training principles remain the same. But the duty training elements are vastly different. And this is precisely where a one-size-fits-all methodology dies in this type of organization.

SLS and CLC content applies to everyone. But not necessarily TLC or GTM3. These are targeted training programs that directly impact the capacity and extent to which one participates/serves. But they need to remain areas that the individual member pursues.

The whole "activities should be fun, challenging, etc." doesn't really apply to the senior corps in its entirety. Senior members are not in a constant practical training program. They can be but are not necessarily required to be. Many seniors want a no-bullhockey environment where everyone takes it serious (show up, work, leave). And those grunts may be absolutely fantastic at what they do in that arena. Then there are the ones that thrive on social activities who want to be the planners and coordinators; and they are fantastic at what they do.

We need to understand that senior members are not cadets, and they're not being trained to be developed, self-reliant adults. This is the expectation when they join. We catch them up to speed on the "CAP way," but we expect them to pick up on their own and be self-starting (which we automatically expect cadets to need to learn how to do as they move up in the program).

This is where we need to look to the local level and help squadron units build up their own corps of seniors to meet the needs of those in the locale. What are your senior members looking for, and, are you (as a Commander or designee) helping to provide them that? We can't write a manual for how we maintain a senior program when it's really about knowing your people and working to provide them with operational opportunity and personal development. And that's going to differ for most people on a career track where it's at your own pace and to your own agenda.

Quote from: Eclipse on February 18, 2020, 08:00:15 pmWhich is probably the core of the issues CAP has today, namely attempting
to mirror a military organizaiton and augment ES response agencies while
essentially requiring no training or participation, per se, coupled with little oversight or little ramifications for lack of execution.

Exactly this.

And, again, this goes right back to the fact that CAP has multiple missions that are virtually segregated. Our missions may be effective in their own nature, but they are really not well interfaced, which creates a difference in the training structure of the people involved.

This can't be a cookie cutter approach to maintaining a senior member roster.

PHall

Key Trait for a Senior Member? That's easy, to actually act like an adult!

etodd

Quote from: Eclipse on February 18, 2020, 08:00:15 pm.... attempting to mirror a military organization .....

....when a large number of the civilian volunteers are not interested in that aspect.

We are too diverse from one Squadron to the next, one Wing to the next. There is no one size fits all cookie cutter solution for Seniors.
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

Eclipse

Quote from: etodd on February 18, 2020, 10:19:51 pm....when a large number of the civilian volunteers are not interested in that aspect.

The fact that members feel empowered to make that statement is one of the problems.

You don't join a paramilitary organization and then complain about having to wear the uniform.



etodd

Quote from: Eclipse on February 18, 2020, 11:01:24 pmYou don't join a paramilitary organization and then complain about having to wear the uniform.

I proudly wear my polo uniform. Have never complained about it. The AF says its ok, and thats good enough for me.
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

catrulz

Multiple threads knocked off topic by uniform wear discussion.

PHall

Quote from: etodd on February 19, 2020, 03:21:29 am
Quote from: Eclipse on February 18, 2020, 11:01:24 pmYou don't join a paramilitary organization and then complain about having to wear the uniform.

I proudly wear my polo uniform. Have never complained about it. The AF says its ok, and thats good enough for me.

As long as you understand that it's not "correct" for all CAP activities.
Some activities require a higher level of decorum.

etodd

Quote from: PHall on February 19, 2020, 05:35:59 pm
Quote from: etodd on February 19, 2020, 03:21:29 am
Quote from: Eclipse on February 18, 2020, 11:01:24 pmYou don't join a paramilitary organization and then complain about having to wear the uniform.

I proudly wear my polo uniform. Have never complained about it. The AF says its ok, and thats good enough for me.

As long as you understand that it's not "correct" for all CAP activities.
Some activities require a higher level of decorum.

Four years and I've attended everything in my Wing from Squadron meetings, SAREXes, training exercises, and actual missions. But yes, I forego the rubber chicken dinner and award banquet at the annual Wing Conference, where most are in blues and very shiny shoes. So, you are correct on that one. LOL
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

Майор Хаткевич

Quote from: etodd on February 19, 2020, 07:06:45 pm
Quote from: PHall on February 19, 2020, 05:35:59 pm
Quote from: etodd on February 19, 2020, 03:21:29 am
Quote from: Eclipse on February 18, 2020, 11:01:24 pmYou don't join a paramilitary organization and then complain about having to wear the uniform.

I proudly wear my polo uniform. Have never complained about it. The AF says its ok, and thats good enough for me.

As long as you understand that it's not "correct" for all CAP activities.
Some activities require a higher level of decorum.

Four years and I've attended everything in my Wing from Squadron meetings, SAREXes, training exercises, and actual missions. But yes, I forego the rubber chicken dinner and award banquet at the annual Wing Conference, where most are in blues and very shiny shoes. So, you are correct on that one. LOL
So your unit doesn't grant any significance at all to awards/promotions, or do you just skip those meetings completely?

etodd

February 19, 2020, 08:53:17 pm #19 Last Edit: February 19, 2020, 08:57:58 pm by etodd
Quote from: Майор Хаткевич on February 19, 2020, 08:33:23 pmSo your unit doesn't grant any significance at all to awards/promotions, or do you just skip those meetings completely?

The Cadets meet in another location, and yes they have Award type nights where they are in blues.

The Seniors? Not in my four years. As the Commander is leading a meeting he will casually announce that senior member Smith has made Captain, or whatever. Folks will clap, then we move on.  We don't do the 'photo op' thing.
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot