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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Aviation & Flying Activities  |  Topic: Anyone have a POH for a C-182?
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Author Topic: Anyone have a POH for a C-182?  (Read 5266 times)
DrJbdm
Seasoned Member

Posts: 380

« on: August 29, 2007, 09:16:52 PM »

Hey guys, I'm looking at getting checked out in a CAP C-182 and was trying to find an electronic version of the POH, perhaps something that was even scanned in as a PDF file? anyone have a file they can send me?

  Also can someone tell me the best way to go about getting checked out? I don't have a high performance/complex endorsement...although the plane I did my instrument rating in has a constant speed prop...(Diamond DA-40)

  I have been told that it is far easier to get checked out in the new 182T models if you are already qualified on the 182 with a current CAPF-5

   Another CAP Officer and I are wanting to get checked out, we have talked about riding backseat while the other is getting the front seat lesson and then switching out. Perhaps seeing the lesson being done from the backseat will re-enforce the lesson the guy in the back when it comes to his turn up front.
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SJFedor
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« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2007, 09:41:22 PM »

Hey John-

Take a look at 60-1, where it outlines the required "transition" program to get into the 182. They used to require 10 hours of High Perf time and 25 landings, now it's a bunch of landings in different configurations.

Find an IP that'll do this program with you, and give you a high perf endorsement while you're at it. The IP that does this program with you, however, cannot be your initial checkpilot.

The 182 isn't that tricky to fly, the only tricky part can be landing, since the nose is so heavy.

The 182Ts vs the other 182's we have (Q's, R's, etc) aren't really that much different. They fly pretty much the same, speeds are about the same, and the general theory of using the manifold pressure and prop control,  cowl flaps, etc are all the same. The only main kicker is using the fuel pump to start the engine. If you've flown a DA-40 or a Piper aircraft, you've already gone through that. If you're talking about the 182T's with the NAVIII package (G1000), that's another story. However, 60-1 says you're not required to hold a round dial qual prior to doing the G1000 qual, as long as you meet their standards. '

If you got more questions, fire away. You can find a lot of the answers in 60-1 or by talking direct to your Wing Stan/Eval officer, since every wing is not equal and doesn't do it the same as others.

And to answer your original question, no, I don't have a PDF of the 182 POH. Sorry  ;D
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Steven Fedor, NREMT-P
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DrJbdm
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Posts: 380

« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2007, 11:16:14 PM »

Thanks for the info Steve.
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Trung Si Ma
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Posts: 446

« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2007, 11:18:49 PM »

John,

Where in Texas are you?  I have 182T and the Nav III "Information Manuals" (also have the 182Q information manual), which is probably what you are looking for.

Don
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DrJbdm
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Posts: 380

« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2007, 01:35:55 AM »

Hi Don,

   I live in Austin. I would actually LOVE a copy of both manuals. My goal is to get certified for the 182T with Nav III but I first want to get signed off on the steam gauge model.
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Trung Si Ma
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Posts: 446

« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2007, 03:11:37 AM »

John,

Send your address to me (N12614@aol.com) and I'll ship them down to you.  You can send them back after you get checked out.

I've flown 182's (got my High Perf and Complex sign offs in a 182RG), but I prefer flying my 172 and don't intend to do a CAPF 5 on 182's until there are no more 172's in my wing.

Don
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JC004
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« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2007, 04:51:27 AM »

^^ careful with e-mail addresses in your post...spiders will get it
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RogueLeader
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« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2007, 05:22:54 AM »

or those with nothing better to do :angel:
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<redacted>

GRW 3340
av8
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« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2007, 07:09:42 PM »

What Capt. Fedor posted is correct. If do not have an HP endorsement (or HP PIC time logged prior to 1997 or previous CAP HP qualifications) you must complete the "transition" training as outlined in 60-1 chapter 3-3 (a).

Prior to taking the 182 Form 5 ride you must have the HP endorsement in your log. Also the Check Pilot cannot be the same person who has given the transition training (see 60-1 chapter 3-3(b) & (c)).

Having one HP trainee ride the back seat while another is in the front left seat is a great training tool and really helps the learning process!

Mike
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Maj. Michael Berlin, CAP
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JC004
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« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2007, 08:29:56 PM »

What Capt. Fedor posted is correct...

Careful of him.  He's trouble.
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DrJbdm
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Posts: 380

« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2007, 01:07:54 AM »

Major Berlin, Thanks for the information, any info i can get would come in handy. I think I'll transsition into the 182 very well, I'm used to a constant speed prop and the extra horse power isn't a big deal to me, I have several hours in a Mooney. Although I may PM you from time to time and pick your brain about certain things as I'm going thru the process if that would be ok.

  Thanks everyone for the help.

 John
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genejackson
Member

Posts: 85

« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2007, 04:28:12 AM »

John,

I have access to the POH for CPF 4518, N9983H a 1985 C-182R model w/ steam gauges.   It is not a problem to scan it to a .pdf file if you have high speed internet for the download.  I won't make it a huge file.

Remember, POH's are serial number specific to an airplane so some things are very generic, some specific to that airplane. 

Like several of the others helping out here, I would be happy to help answer any questions you might have about the C182.  I have many hundreds of hours in C182's and flew 377 hrs just last year alone in C-182's for CAP as a mission pilot and mission pilot checkpilot for Form 91's. 

I will scan the file this weekend when I'm sitting at the PC and you PM me about your email addy and getting the file over to you.

Gene Jackson
VAWG
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Gene Jackson
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Danville VA
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« Reply #12 on: September 04, 2007, 04:46:37 AM »

Major Berlin, Thanks for the information, any info i can get would come in handy. I think I'll transsition into the 182 very well, I'm used to a constant speed prop and the extra horse power isn't a big deal to me, I have several hours in a Mooney. Although I may PM you from time to time and pick your brain about certain things as I'm going thru the process if that would be ok.

  Thanks everyone for the help.

 John

If you're already familiar with the constant speed prop, and you're proficient in the 172, the 182 is going to be very easy for you.  Just think of it as the Skyhawk's bigger brother.

Here's a couple of tricks which might come in handy. 

Some say the 182 is "nose heavy".  While this is true, I think it's a bit oversimplified.  What the 182 needs is airflow over the elevator to keep from getting "nose heavy".  Many pilots have the throttle pulled to idle during the flare.  What I've noticed is that when the 182 is at idle, the prop essentially becomes a big wind break that actually disrupts airflow across the elevator.  If you flare with just a touch of throttle (say 900 Rpm), you get better elevator authority.  This is particularly important when you have the plane loaded close to the most forward CG (two guys only in the front seats), because you're going to need all the elevator you can get in that situation.

The 182 falls like a brick when the power is pulled.  This can either work to your advantage or disadvantage.  You rarely need to do a slip in a 182.  Just pull the power and you WILL come down.  This is great on final when you're too high.  What you don't want to do is get yourself in the situation where you still have the power pulled 50' off the ground because those last 50' are going to go by very quickly and it's going to be hard to keep that high descent rate from causing you to land hard.  It can be done, it's just more difficult.  I like to have about 16" of MP at least by the time I'm 100-200' off the ground.  16" of MP and a speed of 1.3 Vso gives you a very nice descent rate and glide slope that seems to work out quite nicely.  Once you cross the threshold, you can pull power back to the point mentioned above.
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