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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Aerospace Education  |  Topic: AE Activities
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Author Topic: AE Activities  (Read 9053 times)
Greg
Forum Regular

Posts: 133

« on: February 15, 2005, 12:12:29 AM »

What hands-on aerospace activities have you done, and how did they work out?
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C/Maj Greg(ory) Boyajian, CAP
Air Victory Museum Composite Squadron
Schmidty06
Guest
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2005, 01:43:34 AM »

What I did once was have my cadets build wings out of tagboard, straws, printer paper, and packaging tape.  I brought a few big pieces of tagboard, gave each group a sheet, and had them design their own airfoil using the taboard as ribs (i think that's what they're called, I dont quite remember) and the straws as spars (the dealio that holds the wing together down the middle and hooks it onto the airplane).  And the paper was the skin of the wing, held on with packaging tape.  Due to time restraints and some cadets not getting the jist of it, we didnt get to try the airfoils with the fans in the drill hall.  What you can do to get an idea of how a wing works in the wind is run a piece of string through the straw, and secure each end of the string to oposite sides of the fan guard.  Turn on the fan, and ideally, the airfoil should lift.
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CAPSGT
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Posts: 394
Unit: MER-MD-086

« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2005, 07:33:24 PM »

AEX is a GREAT program.  It has a whole book of activities you can choose, and you have to do at least one a month.  The cadets really seem to get into it too.  For somebody who isn't really interested in Aerospace, I thought the activities in it were pretty cool.

Some of the activities that I can remember were making rockets out of 2 liter soda bottles, building gliders out of styrofoam trays, etc.
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MICHAEL A. CROCKETT, Lt Col, CAP
Assistant Communications Officer, Wicomico Composite Squadron
Cmdbuddy
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My Photos Site
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2005, 09:03:38 PM »

Really?  As a person who loves aviation, I've always found the AEX program to be a bit childish.  Like flying a plane down a string to land on a "runway" aka table.  I think AE time could be better spent doing other things.

There's more to AE than just airplanes.  We used to meet on a Navy Base with a nice dark parking lot, so I brought my nice telescope out one night that one of the planets was showing, and we played around with that some.  That was really cool.  The trick is to not have everybody waiting around at the same time to look- the cadets get bored and start to do other things.  Take small groups and let the others look for an ELT or drill or something. 
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Christie Ducote, Capt, CAP
CAPSGT
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Posts: 394
Unit: MER-MD-086

« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2005, 12:15:33 AM »

That may be exactly the point, you love aviation, and much of this is very basic.  For our average new cadets in the 12-14 age group, it's perfect.  It's a great way to spark their interest so that they will persue further education in Aerospace.

The program is not strictly aviation though, it does include other aspects of aerospace (such as rocketry).
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MICHAEL A. CROCKETT, Lt Col, CAP
Assistant Communications Officer, Wicomico Composite Squadron
Pylon
Administrator

Posts: 5,165
Unit: NER-NH-038

Michael Kieloch, Marketing Communications & PR Leadership
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2005, 12:28:20 PM »

Hands-on activities can also be things from outside of CAP.  For example, one of our Senior Members has arranged for the local Medivac/Mercy Flight medical helicopter to fly-in to our meeting location (a county airport).  The cadets will get a chance to explore the helicopter and be briefed about it and their operations as well.
 
Though CAP doesn't specifically own any rotor-craft, we can't ignore the fact that some cadets interest in aviation may also extend to helicopters as well.  Bringing in outside agencies such as local police and medical helicopters can be a great (and often free) way for the cadets in your unit to have a great time and learn a lot at the same time.  :)
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Michael F. Kieloch, Maj, CAP
Concord Composite Squadron, NH       
Dan
Recruit

Posts: 12

« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2005, 12:54:38 PM »

I try to do hands-on activities connected to the Aerospace Dimensions module they are currently working on.

For example, when I first started as AEO, the cadets had begun Module 4, and had expressed an interest in CAP Model Rocketry program.  So, I secured the materials for the Redstone phase 1, and we worked on building the Goddard and Fizzy Flyer.  As the cadets built their models, we discussed the concepts developed in that module.  And yes, they passed their exam, and have taken on the CAP Model Rocketry program.

They next voted for Module 2.  For the first chatper, I brought a small Briggs & Stratton  internal combustion engine, which I partially disassembled so the cadets could at least see the insides.  (I asked the company if they had any ideas, and they generously donated the engine, manuals, and books to our squadron.)  As we discussed the parts, we compared them to the Teledyne engine parts shown on p. 2 of their books.  Now, they want to further take the engine apart to see its carburetor, pistons, valves, and crankshaft! A teacher can't ask for much more interest than that.

Also, related to that first chapter, I demonstrated how a gyroscope tends to remain spinning in a plane.  I balanced the gyro on a pencil point, and moved the pencil in different directions.  I then had the cadets spin the gyro, doing the same.  After that, I had them hold the spinning gyro with their fingers gripping the ends of the axis.  I asked them to move their hands in different directions so they could feel the resistance developed by the gyro.  I had them spin the gyro in both a horizontal and a vertical plane. We then discussed how this was related to the heading indicator, turn indicator, and heading indicator in aircraft, and how these instuments were powered by the airplane's electrical system, and connected to the indicators in the instruments.

For our next session, we'll tour a local municipal airport to see how an uncontrolled airport operates and to learn about the services offered by an FBO to general aviation.  If we have some time, I want to have them do some simple flight planning using sectional charts and a flight plan template I use.  In December, I hope to follow that up with a field trip to a near-by Air National Guard base.

I also try to find out what other cadet activities are going on, like ES training, because I can usually find some aerospace connection.  I'm always trying to show the cadets the interrelations of the aerospace modules to other areas of their cadet training..

So far, I'm excited about the cadets' pass rates and their demonstrated interest and excitement in aerospace education.

I think this section of CAPtalk is a great place to share ideas.  So, I'd appreciate reading what other AEO's have found to work for them.
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Dan Bilitz, Capt, CAP
Aerospace Education Officer
WI-057 Col. R.C. Jaye Mem. Comp. Sqdn.
A.Member
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Posts: 1,615

« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2006, 11:33:40 AM »

Really?  As a person who loves aviation, I've always found the AEX program to be a bit childish.  Like flying a plane down a string to land on a "runway" aka table.  I think AE time could be better spent doing other things.
I agree.  We've participated for several years.  A couple of the exercies are OK but overall the program is too elementary - even for the youngest cadets.  Our young people are very bright.  The AEX program really can be elevated.

We dedicate one meeting per month to AE.  As for hands on activities, these are few that we've done:
* o-flights with Army and the USAF (Blackhawks and C-130)
* flight simulators - both PC based (we have a dedicated PC with controls) and real, multi-million dollar full-motion airline trainers. 
* law enforcement brought out their helicopter for show and tell. 
* walkarounds on our aircraft - pop the cowling and have a look. 
* built model rockets and held a launch competition (always a cadet favorite) - there is a model rocketry program for cadets, complete with a badge and all. 

The possibilities are as endless as your imagination.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2006, 11:51:35 AM by A.Member » Logged
"For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return." - Leonardo da Vinci
Psicorp
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 606

« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2006, 12:25:32 PM »

Really?  As a person who loves aviation, I've always found the AEX program to be a bit childish.  Like flying a plane down a string to land on a "runway" aka table.  I think AE time could be better spent doing other things.
I agree.  We've participated for several years.  A couple of the exercies are OK but overall the program is too elementary - even for the youngest cadets.  Our young people are very bright.  The AEX program really can be elevated.

We dedicate one meeting per month to AE.  As for hands on activities, these are few that we've done:
* o-flights with Army and the USAF (Blackhawks and C-130)
* flight simulators - both PC based (we have a dedicated PC with controls) and real, multi-million dollar full-motion airline trainers. 
* law enforcement brought out their helicopter for show and tell. 
* walkarounds on our aircraft - pop the cowling and have a look. 
* built model rockets and held a launch competition (always a cadet favorite) - there is a model rocketry program for cadets, complete with a badge and all. 

The possibilities are as endless as your imagination.


Not sure I would call it "show and tell" though :) 

One thing I am looking into doing (after the threat of fluffy white stuff is over and the temperature warms back in in Spring)  is hooking up with a Radio Controlled Airplane club.  I've flown R/C planes in the past and think it's a great way to demonstrate how/why airplanes fly and general flight dynamics.    The more "hands on" type activites the better. 
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Jamie Kahler, Capt., CAP
(C/Lt Col, ret.)
CC
GLR-MI-257
CAP428
Seasoned Member

Posts: 218

« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2006, 07:32:02 PM »

If the AEX is all of that "AE" stuff we do at CAP, I agree;  it is childish.  Granted, I am 18, but even cadets I know that are 13/14 are too old for it.

Cutting out styrofoam plate planes is something you do to introduce kindergarteners to Aerospace related stuff.

Want to know what I would do for AE Activities?  Well, since I'm pretty much still a kid, I have a pretty good idea what kids want to see and do in order to stay interested in stuff.

While it doesn't apply to everyone  I've found that the more high=tech, technologically-oriented, realistic, and "hardcore" something is, the more excited cadets get about seeing it.

For example, my squadron did the styrofoam plate thing I mentioned a whle back.  Then, at encampment, we had the chance to fly the actual B-2 simulator that our local AF base has (they have a B2 detachment thingy or whatever there).

Which do you think cadets were more interested in?



some people might say, "You can't apply that method to everything, because explaining the basic principles of flight is difficult to make 'fun'".

I disagree.  For example, instead of describing Bernoulli's principle by blowing on a piece of paper, [not fun] you could use large airplane models, or better yet, go see a REAL airplane and describe how the shape creates lift.[lots of fun]

Or use a computer program to make a cool simulation of how it works.


That is what I see as the best way to keep cadets interested in aviation.  Also pretty much anything that has to do with seeing hands-on aviation-oriented careers in the military.  Most like that a lot too.
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JohnKachenmeister
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Posts: 3,352

« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2006, 10:58:50 PM »

Put me down for the "AE is Childish" school of thought.

One of the things I did was to have all of my pilots save their old sectional charts.  I would then plan activities using the sectional chart that would increase familiarity with the information contained on the chart.  These might include:

1.  A game called "Stump The Cadet."  Questions would be posed to the cadets by me (to make sure they were appropriate to the cadet's level of training) such as "What is the length of the runway at KABC?"  "What is the control tower frequency at KXYZ?"  or "What is the airport that is on a 330-degree heading and 30 miles from the Marathon VOR?"  Cadets who failed to answer correctly were "Stumped," and would be refered to the cadet officers, who formed a board of judges.  They would decide on the appropriate "Physical Challenge," which usually involved a type of vigorous exercise that had to be completed within a short time limit.  The overall format was that of a television game show.

2.  "Daylight Bombing."  A target would be designated, and the cadets would be divided into teams representing B-17 groups.  The cadets would have to plan an air raid on the target, with each group taking off from a different field and flying a course designed to confuse the enemy as to target intention, but with all groups arriving over the target within short intervals.  They would have to plan their flights for assigned altitudes, using current weather data.  This developed in them an appreciation for military planning, navigation, and the problems faced by the 8th Air Force during World War II.  I usually planned this as part of an overall unit studying the European Air War, and would show them some movies, usually "Memphis Belle."

3.  "Hot Date."  Similar to "Daylight Bombing," but not as complex.  Tell the cadets that their girlfriend's or boyfriend's very favorite rock-n-roll band is playing at a certain city.  They would have to plan a XC flight there, selecting the airport, route of flight, and planning for weather.  This would also involve the use of airport guides, since they will need to take her out to dinner, and rent a car. 

Another activity is to use an RC airplane as a training aid.  As you explain the control surfaces, you operate the control, and let them see in the classrom where the control surfaces are and how they work.  Easier than taking everybody out to the flight line and using a real airplane.
 
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Another former CAP officer
CAP428
Seasoned Member

Posts: 218

« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2006, 02:15:16 AM »

The coolest thing I did, and I guess it is considered AE, was at encampment.  One of the Officers was an Air Force Officer with AWACS and he brought in their simulator computer program that simulates the radar stuff they use.  Two teams were given walkie-talkies and based off the information we had on our radar screen, we had to call in air strikes using "our" planes to attack the other teams.

It was sweet.
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freeflight
Member

Posts: 72

« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2006, 06:38:11 PM »

I’m a member Aerospace Education Officer of a senior squadron.  The squadron comprises of former Air Force, airline captains and backcountry pilots.  These pilots have far more experience then what Civil Air Patrol has in their Aerospace Education Program and more experience then I have.  I had to rely on the experience and knowledge that I have.  Some of the things that I have done are as follows:

Here are some topics taken from my reports.

1st LT C discussed aviation archaeology.  LT C used several web-based databases with reports and photos to lead the discussion. The squadron members were shown what crash sites look like now and were to go to obtain military crash reports.               
These included:                          
Mapping http://topozone.com 
Maps    http://terraserver.microsoft.com 
Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com   
Crash reports and crash sites   http://www.lostbirds.com 
Crash siteshttp://www.aircraftarchaeology.com 
Arizona crash siteshttp://www.serve.com/mahood/a-12    
Search for SR-71 site   http://okwreckchasing.com 
Oklahoma crash sites   http://www.wp21.com/b25crash
B-25 crash site   http://www.check-six.com 
Crash sites in Coloradohttp://coloradowreckchasing.tripod.com/index.html   
Federal Databases                  
Air Force Rescue Coordination Center http://www2.acc.af.mil/afrcc
NTSB   http://www.ntsb.gov/aviation/aviation.htm   

1st Lt C lead a discussion on the International Space Station (I.S.S) and satellite tracking.  1st Lt C passed out a guild on when the I.S.S. would be visible in the Salt Lake Valley for the coming week.  Along with this weekly guild was a guild for that evening.  The squadron adjourned and reformed outside to watch the I.S.S. pass overhead in the north end of the valley. Listed in the weekly guild was the web address for future guilds www.heavens-above.com.

1st Lt B conducted a presentation on lighter then air (LTA) operations. 1st Lt B discussed his LTA flights in Mexico and Bolivia. He was invited by the Mexican government to fly in several balloon festivals.  He also discussed the requirements for flying in high altitudes in Bolivia

Maj G presented a class in aircraft carrier operations. He focused on his experiences as a S-2F pilot conducting anti submarine warfare. He presented several slides showing the proper way of landing on a straight deck carrier.

Capt C presented the Nova program “Who Killed the Red Baron”. The video used transcripts from eyewitness and journals. The video talked about the personal history of the Red Baron. The video also reenacted the final fight the Red Baron was involved in that lead to he death. A discussion was lead after about the history of World War One air combat.

Capt C presented a US Army Air Force training film on the flight operations of the B-17F. There was a discussion on the cost of flying a B-17 and the similarities of the single engine aircraft CAP flies.

1st LT C discussed the JPL/NASA probe “Deep Impact” which will be sent to study comet Temple 1.  Spacecraft will send impact probe to impact Temple 1 to study impact craters on objects in space.  Included on impact probe will be a list of people from Earth.  Deep Impact web site will accept name till The 31st of January 2004.  http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/ 1st LT C invited squadron members to add their names to the list.

1st Lt C lead a discussion on the International Space Station (I.S.S) and satellite tracking.  1st Lt C passed out a guild on when the I.S.S. would be visible in the Salt Lake Valley for the coming week.  Along with this weekly guild was a guild for that evening.  The squadron adjourned and reformed outside to watch the I.S.S. pass overhead in the north end of the valley. Listed in the weekly guild was the web address for future guilds www.heavens-above.com.

I realize this is long but I hope it helps.
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BillB
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,987

« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2006, 08:50:56 PM »

One of the things I see missing from AE is motion. Aircraft fly, they move, control surfaces move. But books or manuals show static pictures or drawings. This can be boring. WIWAC we has 16mm films from USAF on principles of flight, aerodynamics etc. The classroom instructors used model aircraft in conjunction with the films. I see no reason why video tapes or DVDs can't be produced for AE subjects. It's possible many videos are available now in Air Force channels. The statement was that CAP has to use technology, and that's true. Cadets have been brought up in the computer age, they are used to high tech equipment and probably use hi tech stuff every day. But AE is still back in the 60's as far as programs that can hold a cadets interest.
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Gil Robb Wilson # 19
Gil Robb Wilson # 104
fyrfitrmedic
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Posts: 555

« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2006, 10:56:36 PM »

One of the things I see missing from AE is motion. Aircraft fly, they move, control surfaces move. But books or manuals show static pictures or drawings. This can be boring. WIWAC we has 16mm films from USAF on principles of flight, aerodynamics etc. The classroom instructors used model aircraft in conjunction with the films. I see no reason why video tapes or DVDs can't be produced for AE subjects. It's possible many videos are available now in Air Force channels. The statement was that CAP has to use technology, and that's true. Cadets have been brought up in the computer age, they are used to high tech equipment and probably use hi tech stuff every day. But AE is still back in the 60's as far as programs that can hold a cadets interest.

WIWAC we had all sorts of interesting films [and later videos] via Air Force channels; it helped that one of our members was an Air Guard recruiter.

 It'd be nice if info re: obtaining this sort of thing nowadays was readily available.
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MAJ Tony Rowley CAP
Lansdowne PA USA
"The passion of rescue reveals the highest dynamic of the human soul." -- Kurt Hahn
CAP428
Seasoned Member

Posts: 218

« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2006, 05:10:35 PM »

I'm thinking about making my own AE videos and then giving them to my squadron to see if they would like to use them.  I have quite a bit of experience in video production and know some people with planes (or better yet, use a CAP plane).  This would make AE much more interesting than book lectures.

I know an Officer from my wing recorded the AE modules into mp3 files and they can be put onto your iPod.  I downloaded a few of them.  She submitted them to NHQ and they put them on a website.  I'll try to find the address.

If I make the videos I will submit them to NHQ and see if they would put them on that site as well so AEOs and other people can make AE more interesting.
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CAP428
Seasoned Member

Posts: 218

« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2006, 02:14:37 PM »

Wow.  I killed that discussion quickly.  :o ;D
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Psicorp
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 606

« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2006, 04:08:46 PM »

Wow.  I killed that discussion quickly.  :o ;D

If you would post or email me the link to the MP3's you submitted, I would appreciate it.  While I'm involved with the Cadet's AE studies, I do like fill in once in a while.

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Jamie Kahler, Capt., CAP
(C/Lt Col, ret.)
CC
GLR-MI-257
CAP428
Seasoned Member

Posts: 218

« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2006, 04:16:46 PM »

Oh, I didn't submit the mp3s.  An Officer in my Wing did, but I know for a fact NHQ posted them on a website.  Im still looking for the address and will get it to you as soon as I find it.
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Pylon
Administrator

Posts: 5,165
Unit: NER-NH-038

Michael Kieloch, Marketing Communications & PR Leadership
« Reply #19 on: November 13, 2006, 04:17:52 PM »

Wow.  I killed that discussion quickly.  :o ;D

If you would post or email me the link to the MP3's you submitted, I would appreciate it.  While I'm involved with the Cadet's AE studies, I do like fill in once in a while.



I agree -- cool concept!  Perhaps something that could be made into an Audiobook item to checkout from the unit training library!  

Let us know if you find those files or the URL.  If you can't find 'em posted on the web, but have the files on your computer, you can zip 'em and post them here on the board (Just click "Additional Options..." when writing your post).  :)

Thanks to all for sharing the nifty ideas.
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Michael F. Kieloch, Maj, CAP
Concord Composite Squadron, NH       
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Aerospace Education  |  Topic: AE Activities
 


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