September 28, 2020, 05:40:46 am

tarps and ponchos

Started by OhioShepherds, January 08, 2020, 08:41:03 pm

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OhioShepherds

Hello,
We are new to CAP and just getting our 24 hour packs put together.  Please recommend a tarp/poncho that is light weight and still durable.  Thank you! 

Gunsotsu

Standard USGI poncho. Cheap. Abundant. Versatile.

End thread.

Eclipse

Personally I would suggest raingear / shelter material that are separate pieces.

Using a poncho as a shelter sounds great on paper and doesn't generally work out that well,
and vice versa.

A cheap, small, light 1-man tent is fine for the shelter, get a tarp free at Harbor Freight, and
a decent rain suit and move on.  100% guarantee you'll wear the rainsuit on the reg, and use the shelter stuff once
or twice unless you go to NESA, and then they have all sorts of opinions on that stuff.



Spam


Second the standard, US military poncho with grommets/eyelets that SNAP, the rationale being to allow a nice 2 man poncho shelter to be easily put up in five minutes or less. In temperate weather, its perfect.

See CAP GT task O-0001, and also sites like https://sofrep.com/gear/sere-survival-low-profile-poncho-shelter/

and
https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/us-military-surplus-acu-poncho-new?a=1711981&_br_psugg_q=poncho

R/s
Spam



NIN

I haven't seen anybody wear a poncho in years.  Speaking from (a lot of) experience, yes, they're versatile, but usually for other than wet weather gear.  Poncho shelter, ground cloth, gear cover, etc. And yes, it can be wet weather gear and will go over your gear on your back, which is something few people think of.

Now that I think of it, perhaps my thoughts of the poncho as rain gear are jaded by the smell of the ones I drew from CIF. They always had this sickly sweet rotting animal smell, and you had to put this thing over your head and stand there while it rained with this smell wafting past your nose. Ugh.

I wouldn't want to rig a poncho shelter if there was rain in the forecast. Been there, done it, got soaking wet for my troubles anyway. Glad it was August and not October.

Those newer nylon ones ("newer" is relative... they started with the woodland colored ones in the 80s) I tend to avoid. If you can get the old-style rubber coated ones, those things are worth their weight.
Darin Ninness, Col, CAP
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PHall

I still have a poncho and poncho liner and still use them as a poncho sleeping bag in warm weather, but no way do I use it for rain protection!

monkey1911

Like others have said, a Poncho only makes a good hooch when the weather is mostly nice.... the more rain and wind the worse it is.

Take it from a former 11B..... get a nice single person backpacking tent for each bag and keep a 4-6 person tent stored in your vehicle.

Eclipse

So back to Spam's comment about GT O-0001

This: https://www.harborfreight.com/material-handling/tarps/8-ft-8-inch-x-11-ft-6-inch-all-purpose-weather-resistant-tarpaulin-2085.html



Directly meets the need and weighs nothing.  $7 but if you have the right coupon it might be free. (I was going to suggest the next smaller one,
but it's only 7'-11" x 9'-11, and we'll have 12 people tripping over themselves to argue it doesn't meet the mandate.)
Get some cheap tent stakes and wrap them inside (you'll thank me), and and you then use your paracord.




Spam


These days, as a GBD/GTL SET, I think I might even sign that off...

The likelihood that you'll be deployed overnight in the field on an actual SAR/DR mission is vanishingly slim, these days, to be completely blunt.

Vr
Spam

OhioShepherds


xyzzy

Quote from: Spam on January 09, 2020, 10:01:56 pm

These days, as a GBD/GTL SET, I think I might even sign that off...

The likelihood that you'll be deployed overnight in the field on an actual SAR/DR mission is vanishingly slim, these days, to be completely blunt.

Vr
Spam


I'm from Vermont. In my area, I agree the chances of sending out a ground team with the intention that they stay in the field overnight is vanishingly slim. But it is recommended that everyone who goes a significant distance from a road be prepared to spend the night in case the plan for the day hike (or in our case, ground sortie) goes awry.

Spam

Quote from: xyzzy on January 17, 2020, 11:20:27 am
Quote from: Spam on January 09, 2020, 10:01:56 pm

These days, as a GBD/GTL SET, I think I might even sign that off...

The likelihood that you'll be deployed overnight in the field on an actual SAR/DR mission is vanishingly slim, these days, to be completely blunt.

Vr
Spam


I'm from Vermont. In my area, I agree the chances of sending out a ground team with the intention that they stay in the field overnight is vanishingly slim. But it is recommended that everyone who goes a significant distance from a road be prepared to spend the night in case the plan for the day hike (or in our case, ground sortie) goes awry.


Yep, I grok all that. In about 37 years of being GT rated, with several hundred missions in NER, MER, SER, and NCR I can count five or so nights where I either tasked or personally led a team to spend the night on the mountain, but in all three they were awake and working tasks - not sleeping rough. In the two incidents where I had a team with trouble we extracted them, asap, both for the safety of the team as well as to preserve the search area per procedure. All my teams on actuals have slept in hangars, EOCs, the backs of vehicles and in tents next to the FBO, etc., not playing LRRP or Recon.

The incidence of CAP ground team SAR usage on actuals is in the process (I believe) of dropping off to insignificance, with a correspondingly rarer chance of need of equipping and training to individual field expedient shelters. Why am I willing to call for a radical update of the gear (and other) tasks? Because from a risk/impact analysis perspective, our VERY light technical SAR teams have a fairly significant entry cost for gear, and by sending teams to train and sleep in the rough (particularly with intent in bad weather) we are actually accepting more risk of training related mishaps that we would gain from any maintained proficiency in bad weather ops.

Shepherd here (the OP) is asking a good question about gear that he has to pay for. I think we should spend our money on gear which meets realistic, likely employment scenarios, based on customer requests not macho self image or outdated perceptions of missions as we did them in the 50s - 90s.

Makes me a bit sad to say it as an OG GTL, but on reflection as a working engineer in aerospace, the fact that our SAR business is changing and dwindling is a WIN. Its beyond time to adjust our TTPs and standards to reflect that.

V/r
Spam