Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 22, 2019, 02:33:27 PM
Home Help Login Register
News:

CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  The Lobby  |  Topic: Military Airlift
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Pages: [1] 2  All Send this topic Print
Author Topic: Military Airlift  (Read 1204 times)
Kayll'b
Member

Posts: 66

« on: September 11, 2019, 10:29:28 PM »

I've heard roumers that CAP members can get military airlifts to activities, I also found a form and a regulation on online.

Is this actually possible, and how dificult would it be to get one?
Report to moderator   Logged
C/2d Lt

Mitchell # 69847

Cadet Leadership officer
arajca
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,416

« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2019, 10:46:00 PM »

In theory and on paper it's possible. However, I haven't heard of any CAP members getting it in YEARS.
Report to moderator   Logged
abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,649
Unit: Classified

« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2019, 11:37:50 PM »

It is possible yes, however alot of hoops have to jumped through.  The likelyhood of it happening this day in age with everything going on,  not happening.
Report to moderator   Logged
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,690

« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2019, 12:42:33 AM »

It is possible but the only times I've seen it happen there was a member of the military unit providing the airlift who was doing the coordination.
I know the two times I made it happen I used a lot of favors that the Current Ops and Scheduling Shop guys owed me.
And we still had trouble with the Air Force Reserve Operations Center approving the flight..
Report to moderator   Logged
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time With Silver Clasp
*
Posts: 30,282

« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2019, 01:34:21 AM »

Military Orientation Rides (which by definition begin and end at the same location, and usually in a C-130, Fueler or helo) happen
relatively frequently, but are almost always based on a relationship between a member and a local unit (i.e. Jim's in the Guard and
knows a guy).

Airlift isn't going to happen for a number of reasons.

CAP-USAF doesn't like them, the aircraft are simply not available on a consistent basis any more, but worse,
as happens all too frequently, if an aircraft breaks for any reason, the group is now stuck there until it's fixed or
they find other means home.

I've had these conversations over the years, and the couple I know about wound up getting people in trouble
as they had not gone through the proper channels, and not only CAP people, but the military crews as well.
Report to moderator   Logged


Johnny Yuma
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 617

« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2019, 01:37:29 AM »

Used to be a thing until the mid-late 80's, especially to National Boards. This was back when we had real AF field grade liaison with NCO's at each wing.

Last one I remember was in 1988 during the KSWG encampment at McConnell. One of the barracks was ransacked and robbed while cadets were away for graduation practice well away from the encampment area. Several cadets had airline tickets stolen and I remember the Wing LO and his NCO were scrambling to arrange airlift for a couple of them with the KC135 unit on base.
Report to moderator   Logged
"And Saint Attila raised the Holy Hand Grenade up on high saying, "Oh Lord, Bless us this Holy Hand Grenade, and with it smash our enemies to tiny bits. And the Lord did grin, and the people did feast upon the lambs, and stoats, and orangutans, and breakfast cereals, and lima bean-"
 
" Skip a bit, brother."
 
"And then the Lord spake, saying: "First, shalt thou take out the holy pin. Then shalt thou count to three. No more, no less. "Three" shall be the number of the counting, and the number of the counting shall be three. "Four" shalt thou not count, and neither count thou two, execpting that thou then goest on to three. Five is RIGHT OUT. Once the number three, being the third number be reached, then lobbest thou thy Holy Hand Grenade to-wards thy foe, who, being naughty in my sight, shall snuffit. Amen."

Armaments Chapter One, verses nine through twenty-seven:
Mitchell 1969
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 959
Unit: PCR-CA-051

« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2019, 04:15:56 AM »

There was a time where USAF had regular shuttle flights from base to base. It was possible to ask the CAP Wing Liaison Officer to cut orders allowing space available rides (“Space A”) on those. I used them a few times in the 60’s and 70’s.

Also, the LO was often able to make a few calls to see who had extra seats on training flights. Our LO got me a seat on a C-130 training flight from March AFB in CA to Dallas Naval Air Station. I even got to fly right seat in it for about an hour. They landed at Dallas NAS, dropped me off and kept going. (I was attending Advanced Cadet Leadership Symposium). A few days later I used my LO issued travel authorization to catch a USMC C-130 to MCAS El Toro, in CA.

On my rides to/from Dallas, I was the only CAP member, a C/Lt Col. No Seniors involved. On the shuttle rides, I rarely saw a Senior.

Those were good days. But the flights have been cut way back, bases closed and Space A seats are scarce.

I think today’s CAP members will rarely see Space A orders, let alone Space A seats, so I wouldn’t give much hope to catching one of those rides.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Report to moderator   Logged
_________________
Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.
Fester
Seasoned Member

Posts: 312

« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2019, 05:44:23 AM »

If memory serves me, I hopped a C-130 from Dallas NAS or NAS JRB Ft. Worth to Harlingen, TX with a large group of TX WG Members in 97 for the Wing Conference in South Padre Island that year.
Report to moderator   Logged
1stLt, CAP
Squadron CC
Group CPO
Group DA
Eaker - 1996
TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,889

« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2019, 11:07:51 AM »

Sounds like I joined CAP in the wrong era...  :(

Report to moderator   Logged
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,069

« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2019, 11:34:00 AM »

Old war story, my between 88-92 my Sq went to NCC 3x.  All 3 times we flew on a C130 from March ARB -> Maxwell AFB.   Talk about rollin in like the boss!   Each time we returned, the CAWG commander was waiting for us at the back ramp of the plane handing each one of us a Commanders Commendation Medal as we stepped off. 
Report to moderator   Logged
Dwight Dutton
Seasoned Member

Posts: 261

« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2019, 12:57:41 PM »

Sounds like I joined CAP in the wrong era...  :(

Its been so long I don't remember many details, but there used to be a C-137 that went from El Toro to Lejune (A Marine 707 of all things) and back once a week.  You could get cross country Space-A.  I was full time USAR at the time and could always get a ride but there it was usually mostly empty seats going East.  Going West it usually had a freshly graduated Basic in it, but even so you could get a seat as long as you didn't mind being in a jetliner full of teenage Marines for 6 hours.

They even had a special Marine Stewardess uniform for the thing.
Report to moderator   Logged
NIN
Administrator

Posts: 5,372
Unit: of issue

« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2019, 03:03:29 PM »

Into the 90s it was still a thing, and "National Board Airlift" was a thing for those deemed "important enough to go to the National Board meeting." (it wasn't the National Conference that it is today)

We requested airlift for our summer encampment in 1991 at Wright Patterson AFB.  (NVM that WPAFB was approximately the same driving distance a usual encampment site for a large percentage of our membership, many of whom, like the staff, just drove down) 

Lots of cadets from the northern and western parts of the state drove all the way over to Selfridge ANGB and met a Herk headed south that shuttled a pretty substantial number of the Basic Cadets, ahem, students to Wright-Patt.  As I recall, there were two sorties down on the first day, and two sorties home at the end of the week. (I was one of the 44pax bus drivers that met the airplanes. Good times watching a bunch of disoriented cadets step off the ramp into the bright sunlight to be met by the cadre..)

Arranging those sorties required some horse-trading on the part of the LO.

Report to moderator   Logged
Darin Ninness, Lt Col, CAP
Sq Bubba, Wing Dude, National Guy
I like to have Difficult Adult Conversations™
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2007-2019 by NIN. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.
754837
Forum Regular

Posts: 111

« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2019, 10:15:00 PM »

A bunch of us (cadets & seniors) boarded a C-130 from Tinker AFB, Oklahoma City, flew to Navy Dallas, picked up more CAP members, flew to Ellington AFB, near Houston, picked up more and then finished up at Little Rock AFB.  This was to attend a Southwest Regional Conference in the mid to late 1970's.  As a cadet, this was pretty cool!
Report to moderator   Logged
Phil Hirons, Jr.
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 818
Unit: NER-RI-001

« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2019, 03:01:47 PM »

I got C-130 transport from McGuire (NJ) to COS at Maxwell in the 80's.

It was cool to start. Got less so after a few hours.
Report to moderator   Logged
Mitchell 1969
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 959
Unit: PCR-CA-051

« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2019, 03:53:33 PM »

I got C-130 transport from McGuire (NJ) to COS at Maxwell in the 80's.

It was cool to start. Got less so after a few hours.

Yes, a few hours in a C-130 requires effort to enjoy. But we had it easy. I saw several RNZAF C-130s transiting March AFB. (I stopped and talked to passengers and crew, as I had been to NZ on IACE. I always ran into somebody I knew or a friend of somebody I knew).

Their flight was from NZ to Fiji, to Hawaii, to March AFB, to the East Coast, to the UK. On the way home, they just kept going. Airline seats for women and children dependents, but RNZAF members sat sideways.

On a CAP note: We flew from Norton AFB to Hamilton AFB, then to Stillwater OK on the ubiquitous T-29 (I think every Region LO had one). After getting our pilots licenses at Stillwater, we were driven to Tinker AFB, where we were to be picked up by...somebody. After waiting an hour, we found out we would be picked up by USAF, transporting COS cadets westward. In a C-118.

I had no idea what a C-118 was. Turns out it was a DC-6, one of the last ones in USAF inventory.

Good times.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Report to moderator   Logged
_________________
Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.
THRAWN
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,005

« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2019, 07:37:57 PM »

I got C-130 transport from McGuire (NJ) to COS at Maxwell in the 80's.

It was cool to start. Got less so after a few hours.

What? Nothing like seeing the world in a four fan trash can....been on every frame in the AMC inventory and the worst was the 135. I am a lifelong plane nut but the screech of those engines still makes me want to go the NIN route...
Report to moderator   Logged
Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
AFRCC SMC 10-97
NSS ISC 05-00
USAF SOS 2000
USAF ACSC 2011
US NWC 2016
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,690

« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2019, 08:29:40 PM »

I got C-130 transport from McGuire (NJ) to COS at Maxwell in the 80's.

It was cool to start. Got less so after a few hours.

What? Nothing like seeing the world in a four fan trash can....been on every frame in the AMC inventory and the worst was the 135. I am a lifelong plane nut but the screech of those engines still makes me want to go the NIN route...

Must have been an A or E model because the CFM-56's on the R model are pretty darn quiet.
Report to moderator   Logged
SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,774
Unit: Smoots

« Reply #17 on: September 13, 2019, 08:39:17 PM »

As related to me by a long departed shipmate, Dennis, what has to be one of the worst ferry flights ever -

It was in a VXE-6 C-130 (Think Operation Deep Freeze) that brought the first bunch of penguins to the San Diego Zoo. They flew from New Zealand to San Diego International Airport (exact itinerary forgotten). The ECU was on full cold all the way. By the time they got to SD, everyone, crew and pax, were miserable. After they landed and taxied to wherever, they dropped the ramp, and out straggled cute little waddley birds, and a group of sailors dressed in parkas, in June. (Remember it was winter when they left NZ.) The reception crowd was happy, until the wind shifted, and they became downwind of the plane. All's well that ends well.
It took the crew two days to hose out all the penguin poop, and supposedly, they never ever entirely got rid of the smell.
Report to moderator   Logged
Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
Lord of the North
Forum Regular

Posts: 133

« Reply #18 on: September 13, 2019, 08:42:29 PM »

I'll call you C-135 and raise you a C-124 on a flight to  Elmendorf AFB from Hamilton AFB and return
Report to moderator   Logged
GaryVC
Seasoned Member

Posts: 225
Unit: PCR-NV-070

« Reply #19 on: September 15, 2019, 05:35:18 PM »

I have 1700 hours in KC-135s (A and Q models with the old engines) and 1100 in EC-135Js. The EC-135s had different engines and I expected them to be quieter but there wasn't a significant difference. I think that most of what we heard in the cockpit was "wind" noise.
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All Send this topic Print 
CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  The Lobby  |  Topic: Military Airlift
 


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.053 seconds with 25 queries.