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i_am_a_politician
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« on: April 03, 2019, 09:02:37 AM »

Hi all,

I recall taking a class at national conference 2018 that went over general guidelines on writing social media posts and general PAO duties.

I specifically recall the instructor stating that senior members will be referred to by their grade while cadets would just have the title of “cadet”.

Unfortunately, I am having trouble finding the citation for this regulation.  Could I get some help finding the publication that this is in?
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C/Capt Politician
TheSkyHornet
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« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2019, 01:34:37 PM »

That's not a regulation.
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Eclipse
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« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2019, 01:39:46 PM »

That's not a regulation.

+1
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i_am_a_politician
Recruit

Posts: 30

« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2019, 02:17:21 PM »

The presenter did really push for this.  Is it more of a preference within the CAP circles or is the actual typed out grade preferred?  Is there something that says I as a cadet (this is for an SDA) must address someone as “Cadet First Lieutenant Politician”?
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C/Capt Politician
Eclipse
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« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2019, 02:27:30 PM »

Is it more of a preference within the CAP circles or is the actual typed out grade preferred? 

No, it is not a preference.  "Cadet" and "Cadet LastName" is a proper term of address, however
it tends to lessen their achievements.

I am guilty of this myself, but generally only if I am calling to a cadet from behind or don't know / can't see their
grade and / or last name.

Is there something that says I as a cadet (this is for an SDA) must address someone as “Cadet First Lieutenant Politician”?

See CAPP 151, page 15:
https://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/media/cms/Respect_on_Display_2009__Reduced_2A46F4ACF35F8.pdf

I can't begin to imagine why someone would stress an incorrect idea as "policy" - it's not.

The only thing I have ever seen in this regard is how abbreviations are published (CAP vs. Style Guides).
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Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2019, 02:41:06 PM »

A long time ago there was specific information on the publications on this issue. All have changed. The best info available is in CAPR 10-3, which included abbreviations on grade. You may want to look in it. However no grades are abbreviated.

There may be some more info as pamphlets on preparing official correspondence, specially those pamphlets in the early numbers. I did not check.

Take care.
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TheSkyHornet
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« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2019, 02:41:13 PM »

The presenter did really push for this.  Is it more of a preference within the CAP circles or is the actual typed out grade preferred?  Is there something that says I as a cadet (this is for an SDA) must address someone as “Cadet First Lieutenant Politician”?


It's dependent on how you're conveying a message to the audience, and the importance of the grade (if it even is important). It's the context that matters, in my opinion.

If you're generically talking about a group of cadets (e.g., a C/2d Lt, a C/CMSgt, a C/SSgt, and a C/A1C), maybe just say "Cadets Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison presented a class on flight controls and aircraft maneuvering..."

If you're talking about a command staff (e.g., Cadet Commander is a C/Capt, First Sergeant is a C/CMSgt), I would maybe reference them as "Cadet Captain Johnson (Cadet Commander) and Cadet Chief Master Sergeant Smith (First Sergeant) conduct a staff meeting..."

"Cadet James promoted to the grade of Cadet Chief Master Sergeant last Tuesday."
You obviously wouldn't say "Cadet James promoted." That doesn't tell you anything.

Remember:
Public Affairs (on social media) is written for the entire public, which is made up of people who are in CAP and understand and people who aren't in CAP and don't understand. You should write it so that it's clear to the dumbest person out there plus one IQ point (i.e., Barney-style).

What information needs to be shared? How do you convey that?


Here's an example of a promotion post I made last week (name changed):
Quote
(Photo)
Ellen Ripley receives the Wright Brothers Award

The Wright Brothers Award is presented to cadets who achieve the first milestone in the CAP Cadet Program, entering them into the Leadership Phase of cadet training.

The award comes when cadets enter the first of the cadet non-commissioned officer grades as a Cadet Staff Sergeant.

I don't abbreviate to C/SSgt because to the outside world, that has no meaning. People don't know what C/SSgt is. Instead, I write it out (lowest IQ + 1 point).


Another example:
Quote
(Photo)

Cadet Second Lieutenant Mike Wazowski receives the Air Force Association Award

The AFA Award is presented to the most outstanding cadet in their home unit for their performance over the calendar year.

Cadet Wazowski was presented the award for the 2018 training year for his sound performance as a cadet leader and trainer, and as the most-improved cadet in the unit over the course of the year.

In this case, him being a C/2d Lt wasn't the emphasis point; the AFA Award was. So I didn't repeat the grade. His grade has virtually nothing to do with the post other than first addressing who this person is. Again, I spell it out because most of the people on our Facebook page aren't in CAP and may not know what a C/2d Lt is.

Context.


I always start off stating their grade. Then, if the grade isn't necessary thereafter, I use "Cadet." If the grade has an importance to the narrative, then I continue to use the grade.


Example for a senior member post:
Quote
(Photo)
Happy 29th Birthday shout out to Second Lieutenant Henry Jones!

2d Lt Jones, who is known affectionately as "Indiana," serves as the unit's Leadership Education Officer and Information Technology Officer.



And please use the correct grades.

A C/TSgt should not be called "Technical Sergeant" in a post, or the "Squadrons Recruiting NCO." It's a cadet grade and should be reflected as such.

A Lieutenant Colonel is not "LTC."
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Eclipse
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« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2019, 02:53:10 PM »

The branding guide speaks to this in regards to using the AP Style guide externally:
https://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/media/cms/R190_001_70FAF7B447A02.pdf

As does CAPP 1-2:
https://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/media/cms/CAPP_12_7_Nov_16_90473D63CC1FC.pdf

Neither of which supports whatever the person at the conference was asserting.

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Holding Pattern
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« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2019, 11:25:16 PM »


I can't begin to imagine why someone would stress an incorrect idea as "policy" - it's not.


It's something I've noticed that PAOs above squadron level do.
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i_am_a_politician
Recruit

Posts: 30

« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2019, 02:47:05 AM »


I can't begin to imagine why someone would stress an incorrect idea as "policy" - it's not.


It's something I've noticed that PAOs above squadron level do.

I would guess that the speaker meant to say that you may write it this way, and this is how I do it.  She did address me as Cadet (which I don’t mind at all) during the class, so it may be a preference for her.


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C/Capt Politician
Eclipse
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« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2019, 03:07:18 AM »

I would guess that the speaker meant to say that you may write it this way, and this is how I do it. 

There are many people in CAP who confuse "this is how >I< do it..." with "this is how >we< do it...".

Fair enough until it creates work or insinuates authority where there is none.

During classes I teach, if a best practice or my preference differs with the established I always try to
makes sure people understand the difference, then let them judge their own choice based on my success
or their assessment of my experience.
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