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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Encampments & NCSAs  |  Topic: For those thinking about to attending PJOC
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Author Topic: For those thinking about to attending PJOC  (Read 917 times)
FNelson
Recruit

Posts: 29
Unit: SWR-NM-018

« on: November 27, 2018, 12:28:56 AM »

I attended PJOC in the summer of 2018 at Kirtland AFB in New Mexico (I was apart of Papa Flight) and was able to successfully graduate, so I thought I would share some of the insight I have into PJOC for those interested and maybe thinking about attending PJOC in the future. I would, however, start off by saying that I won't be going into to much detail about the actual course as we were instructed to not "spoil" PJOC for future cadets, I will simply be giving advice on how to succeed and how to survive PJOC.

PJOC is considered to be the most physically demanding and challenging course in the Civil Air Patrol and unlike most other courses, one must successfully complete 100% of the activities and evaluations in order to graduate instead of the usual ~80% for many of the other courses.

My advice for preparing and surviving for PJOC are pretty simple but I hope that it will help you prepare so you are beyond ready for when the time comes.

First, do lots of PT and be able to pass the PJOC PFT without even having to think about it. This may seem pretty straightforward and kinda obvious but the PT at PJOC is nearly constant and very demanding. your PT test also is one of the things you must pass in order to graduate (remember its 100% completion, fail one exercise and you fail the test). Be able to blow past the requirements for each exercise (push-ups, pull-ups, sit-ups, 1-mile run) by exercising regularly for several months before the start of PJOC. Also remember depending on where you go and where you are originally from, the altitude may be very different to what you are used to so you must take that into account, I can't speak for AZ-PJOC, but when I went to NM-PJOC we were usually around 7000'-8000' above sea level during PT (though we did go much higher in elevation on a several occasions).

Second, know your knots and be able to do without a seconds hesitation or mistakes. You will likely be sent a large packet that will include, amongst other things, a list of knots that they want you to know, I think there were roughly 10 or so knots. Like the PT test, the knots test is another requirement to the graduate. Know your knots before you go because there is not much lesson time to learn your knots during the course. There are specific ways the instructors will want the knots tied but if you can get the knots down before you go you can adapt to the specifications that the instructors give you pretty easily. 

Third, while PJOC is extremely physically demanding I believe that the key to survival is largely mental strength and fortitude. There were several times that I thought I might not make it through PJOC, I doubted my own ability to not only survive but graduate and on a few occasions, I heard others cadets share similar thoughts. But we all knew what we were getting into when we signed up and we found the strength in our selves to keep pushing and to refused to give up. Your flight mates are a good place to look to for encouragement as you form very close bonds with those around during the course. I can't remember how many times we all sang "Country Road"  as a way to boost morale and to keep our spirits up.

I want to finish off by saying that NM-PJOC was one of the most amazing times of my life and I am very grateful to have had the privilege to attend such an amazing course along so so many great cadets. I hope what I have said is helpful and if you have further questions please feel free to message me.


-C/CMSgt. Forest "Bomb Squad" Nelson
NM-PJOC 2018 graduate, Papa Flight
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C/CMSgt. Forest Nelson
Santa Fe Composite Squadron "Flying Tigers"
"A legacy of Honor"
DBark3r
Newbie

Posts: 3
Unit: RMR-ID-069

« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2018, 12:00:14 AM »

Hooyah Brother,
Awesome bit of advice for those looking to attend in the future. one of the NM 2018 graduates in my wing and I spoke, and both of the Courses this year were apparently VERY similar (A la Country Roads). Good luck in getting a spot at APJOC or whatever other NCSA you decide to apply for. Maybe I'll see you there =)
-PJOC AZ 2018 grad

btw... first post!
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TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,573

« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2018, 11:13:29 AM »

Hooyah

......... ???

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DBark3r
Newbie

Posts: 3
Unit: RMR-ID-069

« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2018, 11:24:04 AM »

Our instructors used Hooyah. I always believed it was Navy, but who are cadets to contradict USAF personnel?

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TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,573

« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2018, 11:36:36 AM »

Our instructors used Hooyah. I always believed it was Navy, but who are cadets to contradict USAF personnel?

It's a PJ thing.

But, traditionally speaking, you don't use it unless you actually carried the MOS.

Kinda like watching people who "Ranger" their patrol caps. A big no-no.

Anyway, that's just me interrupt. We now return you to your regularly broadcast program. Carry on.
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DBark3r
Newbie

Posts: 3
Unit: RMR-ID-069

« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2018, 11:48:40 AM »

Thank you for the information. I didnt know that.
 It was one of the things we were told to say at certain points, such as after a count off, and in a few other situations I cant quite remember. A few cadets couldn't get the Army's hooah out of their head. That wasn't fun...

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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,512
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2018, 01:12:57 PM »

FWIW, I do not ever recall hearing that from   Navy folks, either before, during, or after my service.

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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 29,347

« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2018, 02:00:20 PM »

FWIW, I do not ever recall hearing that from   Navy folks, either before, during, or after my service.

+1 - 16+ years on the RTC.  Never heard it.

Heard "easy day" a lot for a while, never this.
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TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,573

« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2018, 03:36:22 PM »

FWIW, I do not ever recall hearing that from   Navy folks, either before, during, or after my service.

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"Hooyah" was adopted more recently fleet-wide. But it's still somewhat frowned upon to use as a SEAL-steal (i.e., using moto that isn't yours). Kinda like how we were absolutely, unforgivably forbidden from using any form of "Ooh-rah" despite working in the same facility as Marines. The aviation guys did not want to hear "Hooyah" from anyone. But we had a few Chiefs that would use it much like the Army's "Hooah" in general dialogue/speeches (Ex: "We're going to go out and get the job done today, hooyah? And we're not gonna complain while we do it"...Response: "Hooyah, Chief.") Never heard "easy day" actually used; not sure if it's all that common anymore.

It's all culture.

Say what you want. Just don't be a tool about it. It's all about tone and carriage of personal appearance and conduct. If you look like you're out for attention, you'll get it.

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THRAWN
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,901

« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2018, 03:52:41 PM »

This is the best string of junk since we discovered candy necklaces. Thanks for the laughs. I need it today.
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Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
AFRCC SMC 10-97
NSS ISC 05-00
USAF SOS 2000
USAF ACSC 2011
US NWC 2016
MSG Mac
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,939
Unit: MER-MD-071

« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2018, 08:59:33 PM »

I had already served 9 years of AD and more than 20 in the USAR when our unit was activated for the Bosnia mess. This was the first time I heard HOAH. Responded I didnít have to be paid to pleasure the ladies.
Never understood why rude grunting is now a thing with all the branches.
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Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
Mitchell 1969
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 861
Unit: PCR-CA-051

« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2018, 12:56:23 AM »

I had already served 9 years of AD and more than 20 in the USAR when our unit was activated for the Bosnia mess. This was the first time I heard HOAH. Responded I didnít have to be paid to pleasure the ladies.
Never understood why rude grunting is now a thing with all the branches.

Me neither! Do they realize how stupid it sounds?

(And could someone tell the Marines that the Russians were using ęУра!Ľ (Oorah!) long before it appeared at Camp Pendleton)?



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Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.
Luis R. Ramos
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,728

« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2018, 01:51:43 PM »

Maybe those adopting it watched too many Speedy Gonzalez cartoons when growing up?

For those too young to make the connection, Speedy Gonzalez was a mouse always competing with a cat named Sylvester for cheese and food. Speedy was called speedy because he was fast, too fast for Sylvester, always.

Speedy would always yell when running, "Arriba arriba, vamos andale."
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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Encampments & NCSAs  |  Topic: For those thinking about to attending PJOC
 


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