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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Cadet Programs Management & Activities  |  Topic: Enlisting while a cadet
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TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,774

« Reply #20 on: October 19, 2018, 02:27:10 PM »

I'm starting to think that the military's bureaucracy is almost as bad as ours...

Oh no, CAP has NOTHING on the military bureaucracy. After all, the US military has had 242 years to perfect theirs.

243*

1775...
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PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,549

« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2018, 02:55:15 PM »

I'm starting to think that the military's bureaucracy is almost as bad as ours...

Oh no, CAP has NOTHING on the military bureaucracy. After all, the US military has had 242 years to perfect theirs.

243*

1775...

The United States didn't come into existence until July 4, 1776. You know, that declaration thing.
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LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,859
Unit: Earth

« Reply #22 on: October 19, 2018, 03:40:56 PM »

I'm starting to think that the military's bureaucracy is almost as bad as ours...

Oh no, CAP has NOTHING on the military bureaucracy. After all, the US military has had 242 years to perfect theirs.

243*

1775...

The United States didn't come into existence until July 4, 1776. You know, that declaration thing.

The Army recognizes their birthdate as 14 June 1775 as that is when the Continental Army was authorized enlistment of expert riflemen.  General Washington officially took command of the Continental Army on 03 July 1775, I believe. The Revolutionary War started April 19, 1775. Although the Congress of Confederation created the US Army on 03 June 1784 after the Continental Army was disbanded in 1783.

Interestingly, the National Guard recognizes their birthdate as 13 December 1636.  The Militia Act of 1792 recognizes this date as the official date for the "National Guard".  Although that the term National Guard did not come into existence until 1903, when it became nationally recognized.  Granted New York had their "National Guard" in 1824.   

https://history.army.mil/html/faq/birth.html
https://history.army.mil/html/faq/branches.html
« Last Edit: October 19, 2018, 03:44:03 PM by LSThiker » Report to moderator   Logged
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,549

« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2018, 03:49:13 PM »

I'm starting to think that the military's bureaucracy is almost as bad as ours...

Oh no, CAP has NOTHING on the military bureaucracy. After all, the US military has had 242 years to perfect theirs.

243*

1775...

The United States didn't come into existence until July 4, 1776. You know, that declaration thing.

The Army recognizes their birthdate as 14 June 1775 as that is when the Continental Army was authorized enlistment of expert riflemen.  General Washington officially took command of the Continental Army on 03 July 1775, I believe. The Revolutionary War started April 19, 1775. Although the Congress of Confederation created the US Army on 03 June 1784 after the Continental Army was disbanded in 1783.

Interestingly, the National Guard recognizes their birthdate as 13 December 1636.  The Militia Act of 1792 recognizes this date as the official date for the "National Guard".  Although that the term National Guard did not come into existence until 1903, when it became nationally recognized.  Granted New York had their "National Guard" in 1824.   

https://history.army.mil/html/faq/birth.html
https://history.army.mil/html/faq/branches.html

My point is that The United States of America did not exist prior to July 4, 1776.
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TheSkyHornet
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Posts: 1,774

« Reply #24 on: October 19, 2018, 03:51:29 PM »

I'm starting to think that the military's bureaucracy is almost as bad as ours...

Oh no, CAP has NOTHING on the military bureaucracy. After all, the US military has had 242 years to perfect theirs.

243*

1775...

The United States didn't come into existence until July 4, 1776. You know, that declaration thing.

The Army recognizes their birthdate as 14 June 1775 as that is when the Continental Army was authorized enlistment of expert riflemen.  General Washington officially took command of the Continental Army on 03 July 1775, I believe. The Revolutionary War started April 19, 1775. Although the Congress of Confederation created the US Army on 03 June 1784 after the Continental Army was disbanded in 1783.

Interestingly, the National Guard recognizes their birthdate as 13 December 1636.  The Militia Act of 1792 recognizes this date as the official date for the "National Guard".  Although that the term National Guard did not come into existence until 1903, when it became nationally recognized.  Granted New York had their "National Guard" in 1824.   

https://history.army.mil/html/faq/birth.html
https://history.army.mil/html/faq/branches.html

My point is that The United States of America did not exist prior to July 4, 1776.

July 2*
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Gunsotsu
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Posts: 127

« Reply #25 on: October 19, 2018, 09:42:12 PM »

In my experience, should a cadet join the Guard or the Reserve, they should immediately be transitioned to Senior Member. In all my years I've yet to meet a single "cadet" that was also a member of the Guard or Reserve that wasn't a colossal pain in the fourth point of contact.

YMMV. 
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 29,886

« Reply #26 on: October 19, 2018, 09:51:46 PM »

I wonder if CAP will see more of it as the branches move more towards unmanned vehicles
and is now training enlisted RPA pilots.

That MOS is going to be attractive to a lot of cadets.
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Color Guard Rifleman
Forum Regular

Posts: 171
Unit: GLR-MI-265

Grand Rapids Metro Cadet Squadron
« Reply #27 on: October 19, 2018, 10:05:28 PM »

In my experience, should a cadet join the Guard or the Reserve, they should immediately be transitioned to Senior Member. In all my years I've yet to meet a single "cadet" that was also a member of the Guard or Reserve that wasn't a colossal pain in the fourth point of contact.

YMMV.

What do you mean by "Fourth point of contact"?
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C/SMSgt Murphy Killeen, CAP
2019 MIWG Encampment Squadron 2 First Sergeant
Recruiting NCO

See the source image
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 29,886

« Reply #28 on: October 19, 2018, 10:22:00 PM »

It's part of a proper PLF.

NIN?
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Mitchell 1969
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Posts: 889
Unit: PCR-CA-051

« Reply #29 on: October 19, 2018, 10:49:18 PM »

I'm starting to think that the military's bureaucracy is almost as bad as ours...

Oh no, CAP has NOTHING on the military bureaucracy. After all, the US military has had 242 years to perfect theirs.

243*

1775...

The United States didn't come into existence until July 4, 1776. You know, that declaration thing.

The Army recognizes their birthdate as 14 June 1775 as that is when the Continental Army was authorized enlistment of expert riflemen.  General Washington officially took command of the Continental Army on 03 July 1775, I believe. The Revolutionary War started April 19, 1775. Although the Congress of Confederation created the US Army on 03 June 1784 after the Continental Army was disbanded in 1783.

Interestingly, the National Guard recognizes their birthdate as 13 December 1636.  The Militia Act of 1792 recognizes this date as the official date for the "National Guard".  Although that the term National Guard did not come into existence until 1903, when it became nationally recognized.  Granted New York had their "National Guard" in 1824.   

https://history.army.mil/html/faq/birth.html
https://history.army.mil/html/faq/branches.html

My point is that The United States of America did not exist prior to July 4, 1776.

July 2*

Yes! July 2, Independence Day!


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Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.
Color Guard Rifleman
Forum Regular

Posts: 171
Unit: GLR-MI-265

Grand Rapids Metro Cadet Squadron
« Reply #30 on: October 20, 2018, 05:20:44 PM »

It's part of a proper PLF.

NIN?

What?
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C/SMSgt Murphy Killeen, CAP
2019 MIWG Encampment Squadron 2 First Sergeant
Recruiting NCO

See the source image
Gunsotsu
Forum Regular

Posts: 127

« Reply #31 on: October 20, 2018, 05:41:18 PM »

PLF
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Color Guard Rifleman
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Posts: 171
Unit: GLR-MI-265

Grand Rapids Metro Cadet Squadron
« Reply #32 on: October 20, 2018, 05:42:07 PM »

PLF

What is that?
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C/SMSgt Murphy Killeen, CAP
2019 MIWG Encampment Squadron 2 First Sergeant
Recruiting NCO

See the source image
Gunsotsu
Forum Regular

Posts: 127

« Reply #33 on: October 20, 2018, 06:39:42 PM »

PLF
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Color Guard Rifleman
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Posts: 171
Unit: GLR-MI-265

Grand Rapids Metro Cadet Squadron
« Reply #34 on: October 20, 2018, 06:43:33 PM »

PLF

What does that mean? What is a PLF?
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C/SMSgt Murphy Killeen, CAP
2019 MIWG Encampment Squadron 2 First Sergeant
Recruiting NCO

See the source image
abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,627
Unit: Classified

« Reply #35 on: October 20, 2018, 08:39:37 PM »

PLF

What does that mean? What is a PLF?

Let it go.
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 29,886

« Reply #36 on: October 20, 2018, 09:18:42 PM »

To be fair, at least for me, a Google search required a scroll down the page, nearly 30% to get the the proper definition.

Who scrolls?
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LSThiker
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Posts: 1,859
Unit: Earth

« Reply #37 on: October 20, 2018, 09:22:59 PM »

What does that mean? What is a PLF?

It means:  Parachute Landing Fall

It is a sequence of events that Paratroopers follow, or hope to follow, upon landing from a parachute fall so as to minimize injury.  Unlike civilian parachutes, which designed to be a bit softer upon landing, military parachutes are designed to get the paratrooper from the aircraft to the ground in the shortest time possible without killing the soldier.  For the T-10 parachute, the fall rate was between 18-20 feet per second, which hurts and may injure you if the soldier tries to stop quickly on the feet.

Upon landing, the paratrooper essential rolls so as to transfer the energy to different parts of the body.  That goes:
1.  Balls of the feet
2.  Side of the calf
3.  Side of the thigh
4.  Side of the hip or butt
5.  Side of the back

As you notice, these are points of contact that the paratrooper makes with the ground.  If you look at number 4, the contact is with the butt.  So Fourth Point of Contact.  Please extrapolate the rest of the meaning from there.
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Eclipse
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Posts: 29,886

« Reply #38 on: October 20, 2018, 09:59:26 PM »

^Spoilsport.
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,672
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #39 on: October 20, 2018, 11:34:00 PM »

Since this thread seems to have landed on its ass, we'll just cart it off the field, and put it to bed.

Say bye bye.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
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C/WO, CAP, Ret
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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Cadet Programs Management & Activities  |  Topic: Enlisting while a cadet
 


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