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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Safety  |  Topic: Inherent Risk
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MovingOnToOtherThings
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Posts: 1,300

« on: August 15, 2018, 08:31:10 PM »

Is there Inherent Risk when you take on a job or task?

Definition” The probability of loss arising out of circumstances or existing in an environment, in the absence of any action to control or modify the circumstances.

Is there a certain level of inherent risk you must be willing to endure for a job, task, or organization?

For example: You go to work in a refrigerated environment. You know the facility will be cold and you accept the job based on knowing that it is a refrigerated building. How much can you kickback or complain about the “cold environment” when you know it is a refrigerated building?

Business Dictionary Definition http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/inherent-risk.html
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etodd
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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2018, 01:23:07 AM »

In corporate environments, job descriptions can often be very detailed. The person knows what they are getting into.

The person getting a job in fast food, whose only question at the interview is "how much does it pay?" will often be the one complaining later about job conditions.

But hey, what are you really after here? Your post could go in a hundred directions.
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Live2Learn
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« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2018, 03:17:46 AM »

All jobs, tasks, activities, and pleasures entail risk.  What is the topic to discuss in this thread?  I.e., +1 for etodd...  :)
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NIN
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« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2018, 10:51:04 AM »

Why wouldn't there be inherent risk?

Even jobs  considered "non-risky" like "office work" carry risks of paper cuts, carpal tunnel syndrome, smashing your finger under a fireproof data safe....

Others, well, doesn't take a rocket surgeon to figure out that a job like "drilling and blasting" carries an inherent risk of being blown up (It's right there in the name), or being a skydiving instructor has the inherent risk of a high speed collision with the Earth.



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MovingOnToOtherThings
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,300

« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2018, 11:43:30 AM »

In corporate environments, job descriptions can often be very detailed. The person knows what they are getting into.

The person getting a job in fast food, whose only question at the interview is "how much does it pay?" will often be the one complaining later about job conditions.

But hey, what are you really after here? Your post could go in a hundred directions.


My intent is to spark conversation and receive input from others both inside and outside of my field. I like to ask questions to gain new perspective and challenge myself. The exchange is helpful for me personally and professionally. The questions are usually sparked from one of my classes or questions from employees.


All jobs, tasks, activities, and pleasures entail risk.  What is the topic to discuss in this thread?  I.e., +1 for etodd...  :)

The topic is a generalized opinion on the concept of Inherent Risk not specific to any organization but generalized thoughts.


Why wouldn't there be inherent risk?

Others, well, doesn't take a rocket surgeon to figure out that a job like "drilling and blasting" carries an inherent risk of being blown up (It's right there in the name), or being a skydiving instructor has the inherent risk of a high speed collision with the Earth.


I agree and that is part of the point of the question.
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TheSkyHornet
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« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2018, 02:21:04 PM »

Quote
For example: You go to work in a refrigerated environment. You know the facility will be cold and you accept the job based on knowing that it is a refrigerated building. How much can you kickback or complain about the “cold environment” when you know it is a refrigerated building?

What is the inherent risk in this example? Is it discipline or job loss because someone is complaining to management?

I'm not sure I see a safety risk here. And if there is a safety risk presented with "being cold," perhaps a risk analysis using a matrix would benefit to determine the severity against the probability of outcomes.


Quote
Is there a certain level of inherent risk you must be willing to endure for a job, task, or organization?

So what this question presents is a topic on Risk Tolerability --- What risk are you willing to accept?

This is generally something in the safety world that would come in the form of a job description combined with a risk acceptance chart distinguishing who has the authority to accept various levels of risk...whether risk controls are implemented to reduce risk, or the risk is accepted with no action taken for whatever reason.

The risk that one is willing to endure is known as accepted risk or tolerated risk. This risk is the "I do not want to take this any further because I'm okay with where we are now."

Then you have risks that you cannot mitigate further due to limitations. This is known as the ALARP level: As Low As Reasonable Practicable. The risk cannot be reduced due to constraints, such as finances ("We cannot financially afford to purchase this equipment") or physical/technological barriers ("This product does not exist" or "We cannot alter this to make it safer"). The next step beyond ALARP is essentially shutting down the operation.

All risks should be reduced to the ALARP level, but if ALARP just isn't a reasonable option (subjectively to management...possible, but not efficient, say), then management would accept the level of risk and move on.


This is not unique to safety risks. This can also apply to operational performance risks (quality of output), financial risk, etc. And it can be a very formal process (documented) or informal (verbal/cognitive).
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