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Author Topic: Ga. cadets rescue man from sinking vehicle after wreck  (Read 869 times)
arajca
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,281

« on: August 13, 2018, 09:51:53 AM »

Got this story from the AF Magazine...

Ga. cadets rescue man from sinking vehicle after wreck

Outstanding job!
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PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,204

« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2018, 01:00:02 PM »

This also showed up on Air Force Link too!
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THRAWN
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,873

« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2018, 02:46:00 PM »

That's a Medal of Valor, if ever there was one....
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Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
AFRCC SMC 10-97
NSS ISC 05-00
USAF SOS 2000
USAF ACSC 2011
US NWC 2016
arajca
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,281

« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2018, 02:51:29 PM »

Or two.
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MovingOnToOtherThings
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,300

« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2018, 04:12:42 PM »

Got this story from the AF Magazine...

Ga. cadets rescue man from sinking vehicle after wreck

Outstanding job!

Great story to read for sure.
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Always seeking to learn.
GroundHawg
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 589

« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2018, 02:09:38 PM »

The Silver Lifesaving Medal could be awarded as it was a water rescue, the Coast Guard in GA should consider them! Definitely a great example of our future!
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lordmonar
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 10,650

« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2018, 02:48:34 PM »

BZ GAWG!   Great Job Cadets!
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PATRICK M. HARRIS, SMSgt, CAP
Pacific Region
shuman14
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 961
Unit: NHQ-996

« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2018, 05:03:52 PM »

The Silver Lifesaving Medal could be awarded as it was a water rescue, the Coast Guard in GA should consider them! Definitely a great example of our future!

I concur!

Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lifesaving_Medal

The Lifesaving Medals were first authorized in an Act (18 Stat 125, 43rd Congress) that furthered the United States Life-Saving Service. The Secretary of the Treasury was directed to, amongst other provisions of the act, to create "medals of honor", to be distinguished as life-saving medals of the first and second class, and bestow them upon any persons who endanger their own lives in saving, or endeavouring to save lives from perils of the sea, within the United States, or upon any American vessel.

The Lifesaving Medals have had three designs in their history. The original design in 1874 was "non-portable" and could not be worn by the recipient, but rather displayed much like a trophy. In 1882 the design was changed so that the medal was suspended from a two inch wide ribbon. The ribbon was red for the Gold Lifesaving Medal and light blue for the Silver Lifesaving medal. Finally on 4 August 1949 the medals and ribbons were reduced in size so that they were more proportionate to medals awarded by the U.S. Armed Forces. The ribbons were also redesigned to have multiple colors.

The laws governing the awarding of medal were amended over the years, and is currently awarded by the Coast Guard. The Commandant of the Coast Guard makes the final determination in authorizing the award.

"The Gold Lifesaving Medal or the Silver Lifesaving Medal may be awarded to any person who rescues or endeavors to rescue any other person from drowning, shipwreck, or other perils of the water. The rescue or attempted rescue must either take place in waters within the U.S. or subject to the jurisdiction thereof, or one or the other of the parties must be a citizen of the U.S. or from a vessel or aircraft owned or operated by citizens of the U.S."[3]

The Lifesaving Medal is issued in two grades, being silver and gold. "The Gold Lifesaving Medal may be awarded to an individual who performed a rescue or attempted rescue at the risk of his or her own life, and demonstrates extreme and heroic daring. The Silver Lifesaving Medal may be awarded to an individual who performed a rescue or attempted rescue where the circumstances do not sufficiently distinguish the individual to deserve the medal of gold, but demonstrate such extraordinary effort as to merit recognition. If neither the Gold nor Silver Lifesaving Medal is appropriate, then a Certificate of Valor or an appropriate Coast Guard Public Service Award may be considered."[3]

Until the mid-20th century, the Lifesaving Medal was often bestowed upon members of the military; however in recent times the decoration has become somewhat rare. This is due primarily to the creation of a variety of additional military decorations that are often considered more prestigious than the Lifesaving Medal. The United States Navy often issues the Navy and Marine Corps Medal, instead of the Lifesaving Medal, for sea rescues involving risk of life. "Military personnel serving on active duty would normally not be recommended for Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals; however, military personnel may be recommended for a Lifesaving Medal if the act of heroism was performed while the individual was in a leave or liberty status. In all other circumstances, a military award should be considered."[3] The Lifesaving Medal is authorized for wear on U.S. military uniforms.[4]

The Lifesaving Medal is unusual among U.S. medals because it is actually struck from precious metal, silver or gold, depending on the grade.[5] Most other medals are struck from inexpensive alloys.

Multiple awards of the Lifesaving Medal are denoted by award stars on the decoration’s ribbon and a gold clasp, inscribed with the recipient’s name, is worn on the actual medal.

Since 1874, more than 600 Gold Lifesaving Medals and more than 1,900 Silver Lifesaving Medals have been awarded.[5] There have been fewer awards of the Lifesaving Medals than there have been of the Medal of Honor.

The Gold Lifesaving Medal and Silver Lifesaving Medal are U.S. decorations issued by the United States Coast Guard. The awards were first established by Act of Congress, 20 June 1874; later authorized by 14 U.S.C. § 500.[1] These decorations are two of the oldest medals in the United States and were originally established at the Department of Treasury as Lifesaving Medals First and Second Class. The Department of the Treasury initially gave the award, but today the United States Coast Guard awards it through the Department of Homeland Security.[2] They are not classified as military decorations, and may be awarded to any person.

I've Bolded the parts above that I think apply. I'd recommend them for a Gold Life Saving Medal to the Coast Guard and let them make the call to award it or not.

Regardless, CAP should be presenting them an award for their deed of valor and heroism.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2018, 05:10:57 PM by shuman14 » Logged
Joseph J. Clune
Major (Promotable), Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 -1998, 2000 - Present     CAP (National Patron) 2013 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000       USCGAux: 2004 - Present
Spam
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,124
Unit: GA-001

« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2018, 05:22:40 PM »

FYI


Their unit submitted two online F120s on the 25th, which is in our awards review 'chute now.


V/r
Spam


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PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,204

« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2018, 05:25:55 PM »

The Silver Lifesaving Medal could be awarded as it was a water rescue, the Coast Guard in GA should consider them! Definitely a great example of our future!

I concur!

Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lifesaving_Medal

The Lifesaving Medals were first authorized in an Act (18 Stat 125, 43rd Congress) that furthered the United States Life-Saving Service. The Secretary of the Treasury was directed to, amongst other provisions of the act, to create "medals of honor", to be distinguished as life-saving medals of the first and second class, and bestow them upon any persons who endanger their own lives in saving, or endeavouring to save lives from perils of the sea, within the United States, or upon any American vessel.

The Lifesaving Medals have had three designs in their history. The original design in 1874 was "non-portable" and could not be worn by the recipient, but rather displayed much like a trophy. In 1882 the design was changed so that the medal was suspended from a two inch wide ribbon. The ribbon was red for the Gold Lifesaving Medal and light blue for the Silver Lifesaving medal. Finally on 4 August 1949 the medals and ribbons were reduced in size so that they were more proportionate to medals awarded by the U.S. Armed Forces. The ribbons were also redesigned to have multiple colors.

The laws governing the awarding of medal were amended over the years, and is currently awarded by the Coast Guard. The Commandant of the Coast Guard makes the final determination in authorizing the award.

"The Gold Lifesaving Medal or the Silver Lifesaving Medal may be awarded to any person who rescues or endeavors to rescue any other person from drowning, shipwreck, or other perils of the water. The rescue or attempted rescue must either take place in waters within the U.S. or subject to the jurisdiction thereof, or one or the other of the parties must be a citizen of the U.S. or from a vessel or aircraft owned or operated by citizens of the U.S."[3]

The Lifesaving Medal is issued in two grades, being silver and gold. "The Gold Lifesaving Medal may be awarded to an individual who performed a rescue or attempted rescue at the risk of his or her own life, and demonstrates extreme and heroic daring. The Silver Lifesaving Medal may be awarded to an individual who performed a rescue or attempted rescue where the circumstances do not sufficiently distinguish the individual to deserve the medal of gold, but demonstrate such extraordinary effort as to merit recognition. If neither the Gold nor Silver Lifesaving Medal is appropriate, then a Certificate of Valor or an appropriate Coast Guard Public Service Award may be considered."[3]

Until the mid-20th century, the Lifesaving Medal was often bestowed upon members of the military; however in recent times the decoration has become somewhat rare. This is due primarily to the creation of a variety of additional military decorations that are often considered more prestigious than the Lifesaving Medal. The United States Navy often issues the Navy and Marine Corps Medal, instead of the Lifesaving Medal, for sea rescues involving risk of life. "Military personnel serving on active duty would normally not be recommended for Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals; however, military personnel may be recommended for a Lifesaving Medal if the act of heroism was performed while the individual was in a leave or liberty status. In all other circumstances, a military award should be considered."[3] The Lifesaving Medal is authorized for wear on U.S. military uniforms.[4]

The Lifesaving Medal is unusual among U.S. medals because it is actually struck from precious metal, silver or gold, depending on the grade.[5] Most other medals are struck from inexpensive alloys.

Multiple awards of the Lifesaving Medal are denoted by award stars on the decoration’s ribbon and a gold clasp, inscribed with the recipient’s name, is worn on the actual medal.

Since 1874, more than 600 Gold Lifesaving Medals and more than 1,900 Silver Lifesaving Medals have been awarded.[5] There have been fewer awards of the Lifesaving Medals than there have been of the Medal of Honor.

The Gold Lifesaving Medal and Silver Lifesaving Medal are U.S. decorations issued by the United States Coast Guard. The awards were first established by Act of Congress, 20 June 1874; later authorized by 14 U.S.C. § 500.[1] These decorations are two of the oldest medals in the United States and were originally established at the Department of Treasury as Lifesaving Medals First and Second Class. The Department of the Treasury initially gave the award, but today the United States Coast Guard awards it through the Department of Homeland Security.[2] They are not classified as military decorations, and may be awarded to any person.

I've Bolded the parts above that I think apply. I'd recommend them for a Gold Life Saving Medal to the Coast Guard and let them make the call to award it or not.

Regardless, CAP should be presenting them an award for their deed of valor and heroism.


How would you get another organization (the Coast Guard) to put them in for an award?  And not look like you're "decoration shopping"?
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MSG Mac
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,903
Unit: MER-MD-071

« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2018, 06:39:37 PM »

 

Awarded for: Rescuing, or endeavoring to rescue, any other person from drowning, shipwreck, or other perils of the water.
Total awarded: 600+ Gold Lifesaving Medals 1,900+ Silver Lifesaving Medals.


Recipients include FADM Nimitz and General Patton
« Last Edit: September 05, 2018, 06:43:18 PM by MSG Mac » Logged
Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,204

« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2018, 07:07:51 PM »

Well considering that the organization they are a member of is giving them an award, why do they need another?
The norm is one decoration per act.
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JacobAnn
Member

Posts: 79

« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2018, 08:15:48 AM »

Got this story from the AF Magazine...

Ga. cadets rescue man from sinking vehicle after wreck

Outstanding job!

That is awesome!
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Holding Pattern
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,273
Unit: Worry

« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2018, 01:01:46 PM »

Well considering that the organization they are a member of is giving them an award, why do they need another?
The norm is one decoration per act.

Haven't seen that yet...
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,944

« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2018, 01:07:38 PM »

Well considering that the organization they are a member of is giving them an award, why do they need another?
The norm is one decoration per act.

As much as we'd like to see that being the case, we all know it isn't.

And in this case, considering it was a legit courageous act that most likely did save a life,
it would not be surprising to see the local municipality and other orgs present awards as well.

We've all seen people do something awesome and then spend a fair amount of time with shake and takes.

I don't like multi-dipping on typical CAP actions, but something like this - let them have their deserved moment.
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shuman14
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 961
Unit: NHQ-996

« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2018, 11:06:00 AM »

How would you get another organization (the Coast Guard) to put them in for an award?  And not look like you're "decoration shopping"?

Because it is an awarded presented by the US Government to ALL citizens, it just happens to be processed by the US Coast Guard.

Someone in CAP or another Citizen, that has knowledge of the facts, needs to complete the appropriate forms and submit them with the correct documentation to the Coast Guard and they will decide to approve, downgrade to Silver Lifesaving Medal or disapprove. The "put them in for an award" can be done by anyone and is not done by the Coast Guard, they are simply the approval authority.



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Joseph J. Clune
Major (Promotable), Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 -1998, 2000 - Present     CAP (National Patron) 2013 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000       USCGAux: 2004 - Present
shuman14
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 961
Unit: NHQ-996

« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2018, 11:19:18 AM »

https://media.defense.gov/2017/Mar/29/2001723556/-1/-1/0/CIM_1650_25E.PDF

See Chapter Four of the Coast Guard Awards Manual:

Quote
CHAPTER 4. LIFESAVING AWARDS

A. Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

The Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals were originally created by Congress in 1874 and are now authorized by Title 14 USC §500, dated August 4 1949. The lifesaving decorations are not classified as military decorations, but are authorized for wear by Coast Guard personnel.

1. Eligibility. The Commandant awards the Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals under the general criteria listed below:

a. The Gold Lifesaving Medal or the Silver Lifesaving Medal may be awarded to any person who rescues or endeavors to rescue any other person from drowning, shipwreck, or other perils of the water. The rescue or attempted rescue must either take place in waters within the U.S. or subject to the jurisdiction thereof, or one or the other of the parties must be a citizen of the U.S. or from a vessel or aircraft owned or operated by citizens of the U.S.

(1) The Gold Lifesaving Medal may be awarded to an individual who performed a rescue or attempted rescue at the risk of his or her own life, and demonstrates extreme and heroic daring.

(2) The Silver Lifesaving Medal may be awarded to an individual who performed a rescue or attempted rescue where the circumstances do not sufficiently distinguish the individual to deserve the medal of gold, but demonstrate such extraordinary effort as to merit recognition.

b. Military personnel serving on active duty would normally not be recommended for Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals; however, military personnel may be recommended for a Lifesaving Medal if the act of heroism was performed while the individual was in a leave or liberty status. In all other circumstances, a military award should be considered. For military enlisted personnel, a determination of extraordinary heroism will be made, in accordance with Paragraph 1.B.11 of this Manual, for Gold Lifesaving Medal Awards.

2. Recommendations.

Recommendations for the awarding of Lifesaving Medals, or requests for information pertaining to these awards, should be addressed to the Commander of the Coast Guard District where the incident took place. Table 4.1 identifies the districts’ geographical boundaries. If the district is unknown, or if the incident took place outside any such district, recommendations should be addressed to Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Personnel Service Center (CG PSC-PSD-ma) 2703 Martin Luther King Jr., Ave., S.E. Washington, DC 20593-7200 or send electronically to ARL.AWDSBOARD@uscg.mil. There is no time limitation on recommending or awarding of Lifesaving Medals. Recommendations for the award of a Lifesaving Medal may be submitted by or on behalf of the person making or attempting a rescue. The submission package must include the following:

a. Satisfactory evidence of the lifesaving services performed, in the form of affidavits made by eyewitnesses of good repute and standing, testifying of their own knowledge. The opinion of witnesses that the person for whom an award is sought imperiled his or her own life or made extraordinary efforts is not sufficient. The affidavits must set forth, in detail, all facts and occurrences, clearly showing in what manner and to what extent life was risked or extraordinary efforts were made so the Commandant may judge the degree of merit involved. The affidavits must be made before an officer duly authorized to administer oaths. A commissioned officer of the Coast Guard may certify an individual’s credibility. Credibility certification is not required if the affiant is an officer or employee of the Federal Government or a member of the Armed Forces of the United States.

b. A Statement Identifying:

(1) The precise location of the rescue or attempted rescue, whether from waters within the U.S. or subject to the jurisdiction thereof, or if the rescue or attempted rescue was outside such waters, whether one or the other of the parties involved was a citizen of the United States, or was from a vessel or aircraft owned or operated by citizens of the United States.
(2) The Date and Time of Day,
(3) The nature of the weather and condition of the water, including air and water temperatures,
(4) The names of all persons present, when feasible,
(5) The names of all persons rendering assistance, and
(6) All pertinent circumstances and data showing the precise nature and degree of risk involved.

c. Upon receipt, the Commandant or respective district commander must refer the recommendation to a designated Investigating Officer (IO) for verification. The IO will conduct an inquiry, prepare an investigation report, and develop additional information and/or evidence necessary for the district commander to either:

(1) Terminate the verification process if there is insufficient justification to continue further. If terminated, provide feedback to the originator and provide a copy of the nomination, investigation report, and termination notification directly to CG PSC-PSD-ma; or
(2) Complete the proposed recommendation and forward through the chain of command to the Commandant for final determination using U.S. Coast Guard Lifesaving Award Form, CG-5685. Include a completed Coast Guard Award Recommendation, Form CG-1650; the investigation report; all relevant supporting material; and a proposed citation.

3. Citations.

Proposed citations should be prepared on letter-size paper, in “portrait” format with one-inch top and side margins and a two-inch bottom margin. Citations will be in Times New Roman, 11- to 12-pitch, bold font. Format the citations as shown in the examples in enclosure (24).

a. Gold Lifesaving Medal Citations.
(1) Standard Opening Phrase for Citations. “For extreme and heroic daring on the (morning, afternoon, etc.) of (date), when . . .”
(2) Standard Closing Phrase for Citations. “(His or her) unselfish actions and valiant service, despite imminent personal danger, reflect great credit upon (himself or herself) and are (were, if posthumous) in keeping with the highest traditions of humanitarian service.”

b. Silver Lifesaving Medal Citations
(1) Standard Opening Phrase for Citations. “For heroic action on the (morning, afternoon, etc.) of (date), when . . .”
(2) Standard Closing Phrase for Citations. “(His or her) unselfish actions and valiant service reflect great credit upon (himself or herself) and are (were, if posthumous) in keeping with the highest traditions of humanitarian service.”

4. Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medal Sets.

Only one original medal set will be presented to an individual. A replica medal will be issued when the original is lost, destroyed, or rendered unfit for use through no fault or neglect of the person to whom the medal is awarded. In other circumstances, individuals or next of kin to individuals who have earned a Gold or Silver Lifesaving medal may purchase duplicates of original or replica medals at actual cost to the government by contacting CG PSC-PSD-ma. Lifesaving Medals will be engraved with the name of the recipient and the date of the action (initials only for miniature medals). Only military personnel will receive miniature medals as part of their initial medal set.

B. Certificate of Valor.

If neither the Gold nor Silver Lifesaving Medal is appropriate, then a Certificate of Valor or an appropriate Coast Guard Public Service Award may be considered for civilians. Recommendations for the Certificate of Valor will be prepared, handled, and routed following the same guidelines identified in Paragraph 4.A.2., above for Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. The Certificate of Valor consists of a certificate and citation only with no accompanying medal, pin, or ribbon. An example is provided in enclosure (24). Citations are prepared following the guidelines in Paragraph 4.A.3.b. It is recommended that a military member receive an appropriate military award in lieu of the Certificate of Valor.

I bolded areas that apply.
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Joseph J. Clune
Major (Promotable), Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 -1998, 2000 - Present     CAP (National Patron) 2013 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000       USCGAux: 2004 - Present
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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Membership  |  Topic: Ga. cadets rescue man from sinking vehicle after wreck
 


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