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Author Topic: Health information  (Read 30892 times)
stillamarine
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Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 833
Unit: SER-AL-134

« Reply #100 on: October 12, 2016, 12:46:17 AM »

With winter and cold weather just around the corner, thought I would post something to get us in the right mind set. The following is from both CAP and USAF. Stay Warm my friends!!!

www.capmembers.com/media/cms/u_808680090841177761.ppt

http://hprc-online.org/environment/files/air-force-guidance-memorandum-to-afpam-48-151-thermal-injury

Eh it's subjective. It's been so hot in Bama I think winter ain't never coming.


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Tim Gardiner, 1st LT, CAP

USMC AD 1996-2001
USMCR    2001-2005  Admiral, Great State of Nebraska Navy  MS, MO, UDF
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grunt82abn
Seasoned Member

Posts: 243

« Reply #101 on: October 12, 2016, 01:04:42 AM »


I am not an HSO, but after a crazy weekend at the department, my biggest take away this week after bi-lateral lateral arm trauma with deep wounds: Bleeding Control, Bleeding Control, Bleeding Control!!! Used 6 Israeli dressings and 2 Combat Action Tourniquets to stop the bleeding. This a national campaign right now with National Registry. Hope this is what you were referring to!

http://www.bleedingcontrol.org

I completely agree that knowing how to stop bleeding is a critical skill. Sometimes direct pressure does not work and I've only seen pressure points used effectively one time. I carry QuikClot in my bag but I would only use it if the above methods fail. QuikClot is not easy to clean from a wound when the victim gets to the ER although the newer version on a gauze pad is significantly easier,

From what I've seen quikclot granules are pretty much frowned on. I know when it first came out and we were overseas they were quick to say don't use it unless it was life or death because it played hell on the wound. I understand the gauze is much much better.


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A change in recipe a couple of years back has made it safer, and no endothermic properties. It has been now been approved for use in Fedfire.


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Sean Riley, TSGT
US Army 1987 to 1994, WIARNG 1994 to 2008
DoD Firefighter Paramedic 2000 to Present
grunt82abn
Seasoned Member

Posts: 243

« Reply #102 on: October 12, 2016, 01:06:09 AM »

With winter and cold weather just around the corner, thought I would post something to get us in the right mind set. The following is from both CAP and USAF. Stay Warm my friends!!!

www.capmembers.com/media/cms/u_808680090841177761.ppt

http://hprc-online.org/environment/files/air-force-guidance-memorandum-to-afpam-48-151-thermal-injury

Eh it's subjective. It's been so hot in Bama I think winter ain't never coming.


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Right!!! Our weather dude in Milwaukee says we are pretty much in Go a good ole stomping the year.


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Sean Riley, TSGT
US Army 1987 to 1994, WIARNG 1994 to 2008
DoD Firefighter Paramedic 2000 to Present
stillamarine
400,000th Post Author
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 833
Unit: SER-AL-134

« Reply #103 on: October 12, 2016, 01:15:34 AM »

It has not rained in central Alabama in 23 days. None in sight either.


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Tim Gardiner, 1st LT, CAP

USMC AD 1996-2001
USMCR    2001-2005  Admiral, Great State of Nebraska Navy  MS, MO, UDF
tim.gardiner@gmail.com
sarmed1
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 942

« Reply #104 on: October 12, 2016, 02:37:52 AM »

The current change in C-TECC recommendations moves to any of the accepted hemostatic agent gauze types for wound packing vs the other agent types.  TQ's are still the preference for severe extremity bleeding.  There are a large number of types on the market, all with advantages and disadvantages.  One source for funding I would look to is the local trauma center.  They usually have money available and or know how to find medical specific grants.  The way to hook it is the money spent will go toward decreasing the risk of mortality in trauma.  They dont even have to do the research, its already there.  The next trick is getting the officers to carry the kits, because most already have 8 bazillion things on the duty belt.

mk

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Mark Kleibscheidel
TSgt USAFR
stillamarine
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Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 833
Unit: SER-AL-134

« Reply #105 on: October 12, 2016, 01:52:59 PM »

The current change in C-TECC recommendations moves to any of the accepted hemostatic agent gauze types for wound packing vs the other agent types.  TQ's are still the preference for severe extremity bleeding.  There are a large number of types on the market, all with advantages and disadvantages.  One source for funding I would look to is the local trauma center.  They usually have money available and or know how to find medical specific grants.  The way to hook it is the money spent will go toward decreasing the risk of mortality in trauma.  They dont even have to do the research, its already there.  The next trick is getting the officers to carry the kits, because most already have 8 bazillion things on the duty belt.

mk

Thanks! I didn't even think about that!!!


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Tim Gardiner, 1st LT, CAP

USMC AD 1996-2001
USMCR    2001-2005  Admiral, Great State of Nebraska Navy  MS, MO, UDF
tim.gardiner@gmail.com
HandsomeWalt_USMC
Member

Posts: 62
Unit: NER-MA-019

« Reply #106 on: October 12, 2016, 05:29:50 PM »

I keep two packets of combat gauze in my trauma plate pocket on my internal vest and a CAT TQ in my sap pocket when wearing class A/B uniform. In our class C "soft" uniform (Polo or sweater) I wear an external vest carrier that has a trauma kit pocket next to the radio pocket. That has 2x combat gauze, izzy dressing, TQ, and my narcan kit.
I'll try to find the link for it, but one of the TC3 companies is marketing a vest mounted slim IFAK that is velcro covered and attaches where the lower vest straps attach. Another company has a vacuum packed bleeder kit designed to fit in the trauma plate pocket. Ankle rigs are another option for carrying a basic bleeder lot on duty. There's plenty of options on the market now to keep a bleeder kit on your person on duty. I won't even work a detail without my vest and a bleeder kit.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2016, 06:44:35 PM by SarDragon » Logged
HANDSOME SENDS

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stillamarine
400,000th Post Author
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 833
Unit: SER-AL-134

« Reply #107 on: October 12, 2016, 10:24:45 PM »

I keep two packets of combat gauze in my trauma plate pocket on my internal vest and a CAT TQ in my sap pocket when wearing class A/B uniform. In our class C "soft" uniform (Polo or sweater) I wear an external vest carrier that has a trauma kit pocket next to the radio pocket. That has 2x combat gauze, izzy dressing, TQ, and my narcan kit.
I'll try to find the link for it, but one of the TC3 companies is marketing a vest mounted slim IFAK that is velcro covered and attaches where the lower vest straps attach. Another company has a vacuum packed bleeder kit designed to fit in the trauma plate pocket. Ankle rigs are another option for carrying a basic bleeder lot on duty. There's plenty of options on the market now to keep a bleeder kit on your person on duty. I won't even work a detail without my vest and a bleeder kit.

 My buddy's company does the vest one. I'm plain clothes and still have them in ready reach.


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« Last Edit: October 13, 2016, 08:46:53 AM by SarDragon » Logged
Tim Gardiner, 1st LT, CAP

USMC AD 1996-2001
USMCR    2001-2005  Admiral, Great State of Nebraska Navy  MS, MO, UDF
tim.gardiner@gmail.com
Jaison009
Seasoned Member

Posts: 263
Unit: SW-AR-040

« Reply #108 on: October 13, 2016, 01:32:35 AM »

I have been both an ARC and AHA Instructor. The ARC Instructor would likely be an authorized provider or licensed training provided (AP/LTP) and they would be allowed to charge whatever they want but they have to pay ARC an administrative fee of around $32 per student (increases possible). It is just like the AHA allowing instructors to use their name and charge whatever; however they have to pay their Training Center (TC) an admin fee and for cards.

Here is my biggest challenge. I am a Paramedic. I became an Emergency Trauma Technician (AK equiv. of a First Responder) at 15, VFF at 17, NREMT at 18. I cannot do Paramedic skills in CAP nor do I want to. Doing assessment, calling 911, treating life threats with basic first aid skills, compressions, airway, breathing are the skills that matter. CPR can be taught to cadets with compressions only. There is not a lot of training that needs to be done and we don't really need to be teaching EMR, FR, or EMT level training to our cadets. In this day and age of improved medicine, improved SAR training, number of professional SAR organizations, and EMS (live in AR and worked in AR and OK. In Arkansas we run primarily Paramedic level EMS so if we can do it in one of the most rural states...), the likelihood of CAP packaging and transporting a victim is almost zero. There is no reason for the typical unit to spend the time and money on EMR training. Basic first aid and a solid wilderness self care class is all that the largest majority of our members need.

I previously wrote:

In my post suggesting Emergency Medical Responder certification I did not discuss cost like the OP requested. Browsing the web, EMR courses  range seems to be about $300 and up, BUT this course can be taught by an EMT-B and many units have one of these. I'm researching what additional training, if any, an EMT-B needs to be an instructor.

Alternatively, a CAP group, for example, could pay for a member's training as an ARC First Aid/ CPR instructor. Then I think that member could give classes for any price including free (text must be purchased).


I've done some research on the training that an EMT-B or other medical professional like RN, OD. or MD)needs to have to instruct an Emergency Medical Responder course.

My advice would be to contact your state's Office of Emergency Management or similar agency that oversees EMR training. Some states only require that the EMT_B have two years experience.  Other states require a series of activities *eg: audit EMT course, help teach and EMR course, teach the EMR courses under supervision. Only your state agency can tell you what training is required to be an EMR institutor (in addition to EMT-B) in YOUR state.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2016, 01:46:03 AM by Jaison009 » Logged
RNOfficer
Seasoned Member

Posts: 234

« Reply #109 on: October 14, 2016, 09:20:45 PM »

Something else that's new for 2016-2017 is that CDC only recommends people get injectable flu vaccines (flu shots) this season. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) – or the nasal spray vaccine – is not recommended for use during the 2016-2017 season because of concerns about its effectiveness. There are still many different vaccine options this season. Some flu shots protect against three flu viruses and some protect against four flu viruses.

Also new: Higher dosage for older than 65

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vaccine/qa_fluzone.htm

Egg Free Flu vaccine

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vaccine/qa_flublok-vaccine.htm

Flu Vaccine With Adjuvant

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vaccine/adjuvant.htm

Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every year by the end of October, if possible. However, getting vaccinated later can still be protective since flu viruses can circulate into May during some seasons. For this reason, vaccination should continue throughout the flu season, even in January or later. Some young children might need two doses of vaccine. A health care provider can advise on how many doses a child should get.

There are some people who should not get a flu vaccine. A person who has previously experienced a severe allergic reaction to flu vaccine, regardless of the component suspected of being responsible for the reaction, should not get a flu vaccine again.

http://www.cdc.gov/features/flu/index.html

As always, this post is general health information. See your PCP for information specific to you.

My HMO told me today that there is a nationwide shortage of the higher dosage of flu vaccine designed for those older than 65 (Fluzone High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine)

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vaccine/qa_fluzone.htm

and when it becomes available only those 80 and older will be eligible to get it.

If you are over 64 and want to get this shot that is designed for older folks weaker immune system, you might wish to act now while there may still be a limited supply in your area.

The manufacturer, Fluzone, told me that they are now shipping this vaccine so that additional quantities should be available.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2016, 09:57:39 PM by RNOfficer » Logged
RNOfficer
Seasoned Member

Posts: 234

« Reply #110 on: October 14, 2016, 11:02:15 PM »

http://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/when-how-handwashing.html

Oct 15th is National Handwashing Day. Many communicable disease can be spread through hand contact with a virus or bacteria, followed by touching one's mouth, nose or eyes.

The CDC recommends handwashing much more frequently and more thoroughly than most people do. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
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sarmed1
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 942

« Reply #111 on: October 16, 2016, 07:53:19 PM »

...There is not a lot of training that needs to be done and we don't really need to be teaching EMR, FR, or EMT level training to our cadets. In this day and age of improved medicine, improved SAR training, number of professional SAR organizations, and EMS (live in AR and worked in AR and OK. In Arkansas we run primarily Paramedic level EMS so if we can do it in one of the most rural states...), the likelihood of CAP packaging and transporting a victim is almost zero. There is no reason for the typical unit to spend the time and money on EMR training. Basic first aid and a solid wilderness self care class is all that the largest majority of our members need.

...

That may depend on local or wing unit mission types.  There are some CAP wings that are active participants in their state for ground SAR.  As in deploy to the field participate in GSAR for missing persons or aircraft, more than once every 10 years.  These elements do have the chance of coming upon an actual victim and would potentially benefit from more than a basic workplace first aid type check box marking course.  Everyone in CAP, no, every GTM member, also not likely, but maybe at a certain level be it the GTM 1 or the GTL lever, maybe.  Just my past experience as a both a CAP member and a Civilian SAR guy.

MK

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Mark Kleibscheidel
TSgt USAFR
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,422

« Reply #112 on: October 16, 2016, 08:11:51 PM »

...There is not a lot of training that needs to be done and we don't really need to be teaching EMR, FR, or EMT level training to our cadets. In this day and age of improved medicine, improved SAR training, number of professional SAR organizations, and EMS (live in AR and worked in AR and OK. In Arkansas we run primarily Paramedic level EMS so if we can do it in one of the most rural states...), the likelihood of CAP packaging and transporting a victim is almost zero. There is no reason for the typical unit to spend the time and money on EMR training. Basic first aid and a solid wilderness self care class is all that the largest majority of our members need.

...

That may depend on local or wing unit mission types.  There are some CAP wings that are active participants in their state for ground SAR.  As in deploy to the field participate in GSAR for missing persons or aircraft, more than once every 10 years.  These elements do have the chance of coming upon an actual victim and would potentially benefit from more than a basic workplace first aid type check box marking course.  Everyone in CAP, no, every GTM member, also not likely, but maybe at a certain level be it the GTM 1 or the GTL lever, maybe.  Just my past experience as a both a CAP member and a Civilian SAR guy.

MK

We probably need to train on what to do for automobile accidents since most of us are far more likely to encounter a car accident then a bent Cessna.
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sarmed1
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 942

« Reply #113 on: October 16, 2016, 10:32:19 PM »

...There is not a lot of training that needs to be done and we don't really need to be teaching EMR, FR, or EMT level training to our cadets. In this day and age of improved medicine, improved SAR training, number of professional SAR organizations, and EMS (live in AR and worked in AR and OK. In Arkansas we run primarily Paramedic level EMS so if we can do it in one of the most rural states...), the likelihood of CAP packaging and transporting a victim is almost zero. There is no reason for the typical unit to spend the time and money on EMR training. Basic first aid and a solid wilderness self care class is all that the largest majority of our members need.

...

That may depend on local or wing unit mission types.  There are some CAP wings that are active participants in their state for ground SAR.  As in deploy to the field participate in GSAR for missing persons or aircraft, more than once every 10 years.  These elements do have the chance of coming upon an actual victim and would potentially benefit from more than a basic workplace first aid type check box marking course.  Everyone in CAP, no, every GTM member, also not likely, but maybe at a certain level be it the GTM 1 or the GTL lever, maybe.  Just my past experience as a both a CAP member and a Civilian SAR guy.

MK

We probably need to train on what to do for automobile accidents since most of us are far more likely to encounter a car accident then a bent Cessna.

Also more likely to find people who require first aid care in a vehicle crash than a Cessna crash, statistically speaking (frequency of crash and frequency of survival wise)

mk
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Mark Kleibscheidel
TSgt USAFR
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,422

« Reply #114 on: October 16, 2016, 11:27:22 PM »

...There is not a lot of training that needs to be done and we don't really need to be teaching EMR, FR, or EMT level training to our cadets. In this day and age of improved medicine, improved SAR training, number of professional SAR organizations, and EMS (live in AR and worked in AR and OK. In Arkansas we run primarily Paramedic level EMS so if we can do it in one of the most rural states...), the likelihood of CAP packaging and transporting a victim is almost zero. There is no reason for the typical unit to spend the time and money on EMR training. Basic first aid and a solid wilderness self care class is all that the largest majority of our members need.

...

That may depend on local or wing unit mission types.  There are some CAP wings that are active participants in their state for ground SAR.  As in deploy to the field participate in GSAR for missing persons or aircraft, more than once every 10 years.  These elements do have the chance of coming upon an actual victim and would potentially benefit from more than a basic workplace first aid type check box marking course.  Everyone in CAP, no, every GTM member, also not likely, but maybe at a certain level be it the GTM 1 or the GTL lever, maybe.  Just my past experience as a both a CAP member and a Civilian SAR guy.

MK

We probably need to train on what to do for automobile accidents since most of us are far more likely to encounter a car accident then a bent Cessna.

Also more likely to find people who require first aid care in a vehicle crash than a Cessna crash, statistically speaking (frequency of crash and frequency of survival wise)

mk

So there you are. An area to focus our training on.
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 29,527

« Reply #115 on: October 16, 2016, 11:29:34 PM »

And for those cases, the "community-level" FA classes mandated for GT3 are wholly appropriate.
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RNOfficer
Seasoned Member

Posts: 234

« Reply #116 on: October 21, 2016, 12:22:26 AM »

Chiropractors and the neck.

There's general agreement the Chiropractic can be helpful in lower back pain but there have long been warnings about chiropractic manipulation of the neck.

Recent tragedy

Model Katie May died after chiropractic visit, father says

http://abc7ny.com/news/model-katie-may-died-after-chiropractic-visit-father-says/1564689/

How safe are the vigorous neck manipulations done by chiropractors?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/how-safe-are-the-vigorous-neck-manipulations-done-by-chiropractors/2014/01/06/26870726-5cf7-11e3-bc56-c6ca94801fac_story.html

Chiropractic's Dirty Secret: Neck Manipulation and Strokes

http://www.quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/chirostroke.html

Neck Manipulation: Risk vs. Benefit « Science-Based Medicine

https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/neck-manipulation-risk-vs-benefit/

Chiropractor Breaks Baby’s Neck – A Risk vs Benefit Analysis

https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/chiropractor-breaks-babys-neck-a-risk-vs-benefit-analysis/
« Last Edit: October 21, 2016, 01:29:49 AM by RNOfficer » Logged
AirAux
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 743

« Reply #117 on: October 21, 2016, 04:37:57 PM »

Well, well, did you really need to go there?  Care to share the fact that many, many more deaths are caused through nursing mistakes, accidents, neglect, and actual murder?  The AMA notes Chiropractic care is safe.  Shall we begin, or?  Don't want none, don't start none.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2016, 03:42:02 AM by SarDragon » Logged
CAPDCCMOM
Seasoned Member

Posts: 244

« Reply #118 on: October 21, 2016, 04:51:23 PM »

I will weigh in on this one. One RN dies every day from a drug overdose. What are the numbers of nurses that are on probationary license due to substance abuse? The numbers would frighten you. In the ER you can very well be treated by a physician that is on hour 30 of a 36 hour shift, very sleep deprived, and possibly not able to make the best decisions.

And medical professionals have some of the highest rates of suicide.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2016, 03:42:31 AM by SarDragon » Logged
Luis R. Ramos
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,746

« Reply #119 on: October 21, 2016, 06:42:31 PM »

I saw here a jump that I am not sure how it connects to us.

So I will make another jump.

Since NHQ has already stated we cannot treat any victims we find nor we are to be seen as a health care organization, anyone we find in an accident we are to leave him or her to the professionals.

If one of us gets sick, we cannot treat ourselves, either.

But wait!

Physicians are tired, they will make mistakes.

Nurses make medical mistakes.

So our survivors we are taking to... Death Row!

And us... to NOWHERE!

...if we want to survive...

...what to do, where to go...? WHERE DO WE GO?

 >:D
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Safety  |  Topic: Health information
 


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