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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Membership  |  Topic: 17 year old senior member
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Author Topic: 17 year old senior member  (Read 2185 times)
cadetesman
Forum Regular

Posts: 102

« on: October 07, 2012, 08:50:32 PM »

So, I turn 17 this May, and am intending on joining the Army Reserve, and doing boot camp between junior and senior year...

I am wondering, if when I come back, if I can become a Senior Member, at 17, as I would feel that since I will actually be a member of the military reserves, being a Senior Member would be a better use of my time.

Any experience with this sort of thing?

Thanks!
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MSG Mac
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Posts: 1,976
Unit: MER-MD-071

« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2012, 08:55:03 PM »

If you had gone Active Duty, you would have to turn Senior despite being under the minimum age of 18. Since you are a Reservist and CAP allows cadets to remain as cadets unless activated, you can't change to SM until you are 18.
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Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
cadetesman
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Posts: 102

« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2012, 08:57:28 PM »

Wouldn't it just be kind of...awkward, actually completing BCT, being a reservist...yet still being under command of cadets whom have never been in?
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Brad
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Posts: 804
Unit: MER-SC-020

« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2012, 08:59:23 PM »

The Colonel beat me to it.

CAPR 39-2:

Quote
2-1. General. Cadet membership in CAP is available to all young men and women who meet the eligibility requirements outlined in paragraph 2-2. Cadets who become members before their 19th birthday may retain their cadet status until they reach 21 years of age; however, senior membership is optional for all cadets at age 18 (see paragraph 3-5 for application procedures).

2-2. Requirements for Initial Membership. All applicants for cadet membership must meet the following prerequisites:

d. Not a member of the active duty Armed Forces. NOTE: National Guard and Reserve personnel are not considered active duty Armed Forces unless they are serving on extended active duty. For the purpose of this regulation, CAP does not consider Basic Military Training for Guard and Reserve personnel as extended active duty.

2-5. Upon Joining the Armed Forces. Cadets who join any branch of the active duty Armed Forces (this does not include military service academies) will furnish NHQ/PMM written notification along with a CAPF 12 and FD Form 258 (see sample at attachment 5), at which time they will be automatically transferred to senior membership status. Additional membership dues are not required for the duration of the current membership year; they will be billed as senior member renewals. NOTE: Cadets who join the National Guard or Reserves are not required to become seniors upon attending "basic training. Regardless of the wording of the orders, "basic training" is not interpreted by CAP as "extended active duty." However, National Guard or Reserve members who enter "extended active duty" are not eligible to be cadets and must become senior members. Individuals who join the Armed Forces under the delayed enlistment program are not required to become senior members until such time as they actually report for duty.

So yea, you're in that "not active duty" boat.
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Brad Lee
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Ned
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Posts: 2,217

« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2012, 09:43:05 PM »

I have passing familiarity with both the Reserves and the Cadet Program, and I have found that they are not inconsistent, and indeed complement each other.  17+ cadets serving in the Guard or Reserves get a huge advantage in both worlds.

Here's the thing.  Trainees at Basic / BMT focus almost exclusively on general military skills and followership.  Our older (17+) cadets are generally learning about direct and indirect leadership and serving as supervisors in the cadet program.  This will give  them a terrific advantage later in their military career.

Win-win.

FWIW, when I went through ROTC and later my Officer Basic Course, I found that the Army used a lot of the same leadership training materials I had used as a CAP cadet.  That really helped me.

The Reserves can make a good cadet better.  The Cadet Program teaches skills that will help anyone in their military career, especially when they are just starting out.
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Nathan
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Posts: 685

« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2012, 09:53:20 PM »

Wouldn't it just be kind of...awkward, actually completing BCT, being a reservist...yet still being under command of cadets whom have never been in?

It's only awkward if you make it awkward.

Basic training is designed to create soldiers. The cadet program is not. Your military training will give you a much greater experience in military matters, but that doesn't necessarily mean you know everything that a higher-ranking cadet can teach you about leadership and, dare I say, command (as far as CAP defines it). Remember that there is a reason that many former cadets tend to have an advantage in basic: they already have a lot of the experience that new guys don't and may not be directly taught.

Happens all the time with senior members. I recently worked closely with a retired MSgt (who kept his rank in CAP), and it was a little odd as a 24 year old Captain to get salutes from him. But he was professional about it, as was I, and life went on as normal.
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Nathan Scalia

The post beneath this one is a lie.
SarDragon
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Posts: 10,630
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2012, 09:53:58 PM »

Wouldn't it just be kind of...awkward, actually completing BCT, being a reservist...yet still being under command of cadets whom have never been in?

It's only as awkward as you make it. You have to separate your military life and your CAP life to a certain extent. It's no different from when I was enlisted in the Navy, and a CAP officer, working during the day and attending CAP meetings at night in the same building.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
cadetesman
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Posts: 102

« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2012, 10:23:28 PM »

Thanks everyone, I really appreciate the responses, and definitely now see the merit of remaining a cadet, also. :)
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Flying Pig
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Posts: 5,043

« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2012, 05:12:23 AM »

One of the BEST leadership by example moments that you could have is for you to come back a soldier, put on your cadet uniform, and fall right in to wherever you belong in your Squadron.  Whether it be an element leader, Flt Commander or higher.  Imagine all the other younger cadets watching you assume your place in the unit.  Everyone will know you are a soldier.  You wont have to gloat or boast.  Just strut your stuff, be respectful to your senior cadets and lead by example to the younger cadets.  It wont last long.  Just take the very short time that you will be a Soldier/CAP cadet and just have fun with it. 
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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Membership  |  Topic: 17 year old senior member
 


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