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Майор Хаткевич
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« Reply #20 on: December 07, 2009, 01:35:53 PM »

Sounds like Platoon Leader's Class (PLC) which is split between two summers with 10 week sessions each.

I thought PLC was two six week seesions or one ten week session.

^^^ As per the Gunny.
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flyguy06
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« Reply #21 on: December 07, 2009, 01:49:07 PM »

Sounds like Platoon Leader's Class (PLC) which is split between two summers with 10 week sessions each.

I thought PLC was two six week seesions or one ten week session.

^^^ As per the Gunny.

I dont think the sessions are ten weeks each. i think they are six weeks each. But there IS a One time ten week OCS course if they are doing it like they did when I was in college
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flyguy06
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« Reply #22 on: December 07, 2009, 01:55:18 PM »


If you are a freshman or a Sophomore, you go to the two six week sessions. If you are a Junior, yougo to the one ten week session.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM
The PLC Program has both ground and aviation options and is open to college freshmen, sophomores and juniors. Freshman and sophomores take their pre-commissioning training at Quantico, Virginia in two separate six-week training sessions over two summers without interrupting their academic career. One session takes place at the end of the first year following acceptance into the program and the other session is conducted at the end of the junior year of college. College juniors accepted into the PLC Program attend 10 weeks of training after the end of their junior year. After completion of all training requirements and upon receipt of degree, candidates are commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. Immediately thereafter, assignment to active duty commences.

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Майор Хаткевич
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« Reply #23 on: December 07, 2009, 04:57:25 PM »

I was agreeing...
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O-Rex
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« Reply #24 on: December 07, 2009, 05:21:15 PM »

You're right, 6 weeks, unless they expanded it like many other services have expanded their training.
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Майор Хаткевич
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« Reply #25 on: December 07, 2009, 05:52:54 PM »

You're right, 6 weeks, unless they expanded it like many other services have expanded their training.

College OCS isn't really training, more like an evaluation.
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Spike
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« Reply #26 on: December 07, 2009, 06:52:09 PM »

Unless you are a citizen by the time PLC comes around next summer, you can not go.  I also believe that OCS requires you to be on the citizenship track, or (unless it has changed) be a citizen of the United States.

I have to ask......are you a citizen?  Why did you choose the Marines?  You stated you tried others first, so that tells me "you just want to be an Officer", and it does not matter where.  Have you thought about this decision in great length??  Being an Officer is not just about the benefits and prestige, yet many people go into Commissioning programs not understanding that.  The self-expel rate at the Service Academies and the first year of ROTC programs demonstrate that fact.

First, decide the exact reasons you want to be a Commissioned Officer.  Second, speak with those that are, and decide if that is the life you want.  Third, weigh your options at hand (ROTC, PLC, OCS etc), and decide what best fits your life so far.

 
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Short Field
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« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2009, 07:56:41 PM »

[The pay is nice, I believe an E-5 makes more than an O-1, but obviously I wouldn't go to a 10 week course JUST for the pay. 
  Base pay in 2010 for a E-5 with under two years of service is $2062 a month.  O-1 under two years is $2745.

And as for taking a slot from a qualifing NCO,
  Not an issue as a good qualified Marine will get selected. 
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Wilson #2640
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« Reply #28 on: December 07, 2009, 08:58:19 PM »

And as for taking a slot from a qualifing NCO,
  Not an issue as a good qualified Marine will get selected.

From what I've heard from Marines, this is also not an issue because the full quota of slots for enlisted Marines is never filled.  There are typically more open slots for ECP than applicants.  And almost all enlisted applicants who qualify are accepted.
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Michael F. Kieloch, Maj, CAP
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Short Field
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« Reply #29 on: December 07, 2009, 10:57:59 PM »

^^^ I couldn't remember if they had quotas or just policies.  I never heard of a quota (which implies once it is reached, then they stop taking folks) but I also never had a qualified Marine not get selected for commissioning.
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