Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
April 25, 2014, 12:58:57 AM
Home Help Login Register
News:

CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Uniforms & Awards  |  Topic: How do I "fix" scuffed corfams?
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Pages: [1] 2 3  All Print
Author Topic: How do I "fix" scuffed corfams?  (Read 19782 times)
356cadet
Recruit

Posts: 46

SWR-AZ-220 Online
« on: May 22, 2008, 06:48:45 PM »

I'm currently a C/SSgt, and I'm getting promoted for my C/TSgt next month. However, I'm a bit concerned about my chloroframs. I have worn them since I was an Airman, and I never worried about the scuffs, but they have become too frequent, now.

What I ask of anyone out there is if there is an effective way in polishing, or repairing chloroframs, without having to buy a new pair. Also, Encampment is coming up, and I sure as heck odon't want scuffed shoes when I go there!

Please help. Thanks!
Logged
DC
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,718

« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2008, 07:09:29 PM »

Nope. Once their scuffed, they scuffed. Toss 'em and buy new ones, or invest in a pair of leather shoes that can be repaired.
Logged
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,216

« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2008, 07:11:51 PM »

It depends.  If the scuff is actually a tear in the plastic, your done.  If its a scuff, that is caused form your heel, or something else hitting it, try buffing it out with Brasso and a cotton ball, then polish them with Pledge furniture polish.
Logged
MIKE
Super Moderator

Posts: 5,311
Unit: LANTAREA

« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2008, 07:24:05 PM »

SARDragon is inbound hot to this thread.

There is this stuff but it doesn't work.  Buy some leather shoes.
Logged
Mike Johnston
Pylon
Administrator

Posts: 4,992
Unit: NER-NY-408

I Help Non-Profits | Michael Kieloch, Marketing Communications & PR Leadership
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2008, 10:19:17 PM »

This is why I no longer wear corfam/patent leather shoes.  Once you scuff them, there is virtually no way to get that out.  Some will recommend using pledge, windex, or other products but they will only minimize the appearance of the scuff temporarily - not remove it.

Invest in a very good pair of plain toe black leather lace ups (regular leather) and spend some quality time building up a good layer of regular shoe polish on them.  Brush them well, clean them with mild soap and water between polishings whenever dirty, wear rubbers when it rains and take good care of them.  Not only will they practically last you a lifetime, but if by chance you do scuff them you'll be able to work it out.   If you get a real good pair, you can also have them resoled and relined for less than $35 when they finally wear out and they'll be like new (except better broken in to your feet)!  Plus, I think they look better.   ;)
Logged
Michael F. Kieloch, Maj, CAP
F. R. Sussey Composite Squadron       
RiverAux
Too Much Free Time Award
***
Posts: 10,539

« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2008, 10:25:56 PM »

Had 1 pair that had the heels fall off both shoes on the same day.  Next pair got horribly nicked the first time I wore them.  Still somewhat passable, but my next black shoes will be straight leather.
Logged
Hawk200
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,471

« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2008, 11:34:21 PM »

If you want the look, but also something repairable, try regular leather shoes, and use Leather Luster. It actually looks like a real shine.
Logged
O-Rex
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 903

« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2008, 11:58:38 PM »

It depends.  If the scuff is actually a tear in the plastic, your done.  If its a scuff, that is caused form your heel, or something else hitting it, try buffing it out with Brasso and a cotton ball, then polish them with Pledge furniture polish.

You can also get Bates Poromeric Cleaner
Logged
DC
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,718

« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2008, 12:36:11 AM »

If you want the look, but also something repairable, try regular leather shoes, and use Leather Luster. It actually looks like a real shine.
Leather luster will flake and peel off after a while. Spit shine, its the only way...
Logged
Camas
Seasoned Member

Posts: 426

« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2008, 01:30:07 AM »

Invest in a very good pair of plain toe black leather lace ups (regular leather) and spend some quality time building up a good layer of regular shoe polish on them. 

Good advice.  I go back to an era in the military when the corfams didn't exist.  You either shined your shoes or you didn't.  To me, wearing corfams is cheating.
Logged
AlphaSigOU
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,866
Unit: SER-AL-001

The Kwaj Drafter!
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2008, 07:31:59 AM »

And BTW, it's 'Corfams', not 'chloroframs'. (The latter sounds like chloroform!)

'Corfam' was DuPont's trade name for poromeric imitation leather.

The more ya know: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corfam and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poromeric_imitation_leather .
Logged
Maj Charles E. (Chuck) Corway, CAP
Alabama Wing Director of Professional Development
Gill Robb Wilson Award (#2901 - 2011)
Amelia Earhart Award (#1257 - 1982)
Billy Mitchell Award (#2375 - 1981)
C/Major (retired)
KJ6GHO - NAR 45040
Grumpy
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 832

« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2008, 09:49:19 AM »

I agree with all of you about leather being better, corfams don't breath.  However, has anybody attempted to purchase a pair of leather Navy Oxfords in the exchanges/clothing sales lately?  It's impossible to find real leather shoes.

If you know where to find them, I'd like to know.
Logged
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,216

« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2008, 10:28:39 AM »

There is a surplus store in my neck of the woods that caries new ones.
Logged
DC
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,718

« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2008, 10:30:25 AM »

Online

http://www.batesfootwear.com/Product/NP/Military/Bates-Lites-Black-Leather-Oxford.aspx
Logged
MIKE
Super Moderator

Posts: 5,311
Unit: LANTAREA

« Reply #14 on: May 23, 2008, 11:39:33 AM »

Look at the price! Mine were around $44 at Hanscom, but that was a few years ago now...  They are the DSCP issue type.
Logged
Mike Johnston
Hawk200
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,471

« Reply #15 on: May 23, 2008, 12:45:43 PM »

Leather luster will flake and peel off after a while. Spit shine, its the only way...

If it flaked and peeled on you, you did it wrong. I had a pair for that never did that in almost ten years. At the four year mark, I sanded them a bit, and applied another coat.

Flake and peel means that the shoe wasn't stripped properly. Leather Luster is little more than a latex paint. Paint won't stick to surfaces that aren't properly prepped.

It's an alternative to shining, but it really takes several days to do it right. I know of many cops that treat their leather belts and belt cases with it. It does work, but you have to do it right.
Logged
356cadet
Recruit

Posts: 46

SWR-AZ-220 Online
« Reply #16 on: May 23, 2008, 01:42:19 PM »

Yeah, they're nothing bad. They're just little scuffs from my heels (from drilling of course). There's no tears or anything.

ED: And yes, my bad, it is corfram, not chlorofram. I always get the two mixed up!
Logged
jimmydeanno
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,135
Unit: ǝnƃoɹ

« Reply #17 on: May 23, 2008, 01:59:25 PM »

chlorofram.

Sounds like something that would be in a FEMA trailer...
Logged
If you have ten thousand regulations you destroy all respect for the law. - Winston Churchill
DC
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,718

« Reply #18 on: May 23, 2008, 03:36:33 PM »

Leather luster will flake and peel off after a while. Spit shine, its the only way...

If it flaked and peeled on you, you did it wrong. I had a pair for that never did that in almost ten years. At the four year mark, I sanded them a bit, and applied another coat.

Flake and peel means that the shoe wasn't stripped properly. Leather Luster is little more than a latex paint. Paint won't stick to surfaces that aren't properly prepped.

It's an alternative to shining, but it really takes several days to do it right. I know of many cops that treat their leather belts and belt cases with it. It does work, but you have to do it right.
I have never done it, but people I know or have talked to online have had universally negative comments about it...
Logged
Grumpy
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 832

« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2008, 05:08:51 PM »

Look at the price! Mine were around $44 at Hanscom, but that was a few years ago now...  They are the DSCP issue type.

Ouch! Big bucks.  When I was working, I used a black paint made by Boysen Paint on my leather gear.  I'd get a small can and add about a table spoon of Cod Liver Oil, mix it in and paint it on my Sam Brown.  When it dried it looked like paten leather and it never cracked on me with the bending and twisting and all.  Spray a little Pledge on it, buff with an old T-shirt and you were good to go for inspections.  I never used it on my shoes though, didn't trust it enough.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3  All Print 
CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Uniforms & Awards  |  Topic: How do I "fix" scuffed corfams?
 


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.7 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.31 seconds with 25 queries.
click here to email me