Things CAP should do to promote its history

Started by jimmydeanno, March 17, 2008, 05:25:04 PM

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jimmydeanno

All this talk of the history of CAP has me thinking about what we as an organization can/should do to promote our own history.

It seems to me that if we did some of these things, we might have a better public awareness as well as actually put some of our historical items out for people to actually see.

Thinking about this, I think it would be great if CAP had:

1) An exhibit/wing at the Air Force History Museum
2) Some sort of history book/interactive DVD - for sale
3) Kiosks at most of the aviation museums
4) Exhibits that could be loaned temporarily to smaller museums as a 'feature.'
5) set aside space in the NHQ (that is getting remodeled this year) as a 'museum' of sorts for visitors to check out.
6) An exhibit at the Smithsonian Air & Space Museums (the Mall and/or Dulles)
7) 'Reproduction' exhibits that could be loaned to wings as part of recruiting stuff or public displays.

I think that the history of CAP is definitely a fascinating one, and feel rather bad that there are really only 3 people on the 'historical committee' at NHQ.  I think that a bunch more people and some funding that we could be able to accomplish these things.

I am curious as to what the goal of the historical committee is though - what does CAP see as their purpose?

Any other ideas?  Thoughts?
If you have ten thousand regulations you destroy all respect for the law. - Winston Churchill

mynetdude

Quote from: jimmydeanno on March 17, 2008, 05:25:04 PM
All this talk of the history of CAP has me thinking about what we as an organization can/should do to promote our own history.

It seems to me that if we did some of these things, we might have a better public awareness as well as actually put some of our historical items out for people to actually see.

Thinking about this, I think it would be great if CAP had:

1) An exhibit/wing at the Air Force History Museum
2) Some sort of history book/interactive DVD - for sale
3) Kiosks at most of the aviation museums
4) Exhibits that could be loaned temporarily to smaller museums as a 'feature.'
5) set aside space in the NHQ (that is getting remodeled this year) as a 'museum' of sorts for visitors to check out.
6) An exhibit at the Smithsonian Air & Space Museums (the Mall and/or Dulles)
7) 'Reproduction' exhibits that could be loaned to wings as part of recruiting stuff or public displays.

I think that the history of CAP is definitely a fascinating one, and feel rather bad that there are really only 3 people on the 'historical committee' at NHQ.  I think that a bunch more people and some funding that we could be able to accomplish these things.

I am curious as to what the goal of the historical committee is though - what does CAP see as their purpose?

Any other ideas?  Thoughts?

We already have a history book (#2), NHQ has advertised it for quite some time awhile back the book is like $75-$80 or something.  I believe it was to celebrate the 65-66 years of CAP.  An interactive DVD would be better, because you can take it with you to public conferences/gatherings related to military/aviation.

My squadron has its own museum, in the wrong place IMHO... I hope one day it gets moved.  I think its a great idea that museums add CAP to their collection of displays too.

Also another idea is to have a website strictly dedicated to the CAP history, I believe there is one that exists... I can't remember where though NHQ had a link to it from cap.gov as this website needs more exposure/promotion.

arajca

How about a small display that could be set up in a display case at airports? Get it set up in the terminal area to give passengers something to look at while waiting for their planes.

jimmydeanno

#3
Quote from: mynetdude on March 17, 2008, 05:30:34 PM
We already have a history book (#2), NHQ has advertised it for quite some time awhile back the book is like $75-$80 or something.  I believe it was to celebrate the 65-66 years of CAP.  An interactive DVD would be better, because you can take it with you to public conferences/gatherings related to military/aviation.

I remember them advertising them a few years back, but hadn't actually heard of anyone who ordered one got it yet. Great step in the right direction if it has been published.

Quote
My squadron has its own museum, in the wrong place IMHO... I hope one day it gets moved.  I think its a great idea that museums add CAP to their collection of displays too.

I can imagine that this would be a great achievement for us, however it would of course need to be of museum quality - we wouldn't be able to put up foam board displays with sharpie captions for the photos in the Smithsonian.

QuoteAlso another idea is to have a website strictly dedicated to the CAP history, I believe there is one that exists... I can't remember where though NHQ had a link to it from cap.gov as this website needs more exposure/promotion.

The Civil Air Patrol Online Museum (www.caphistory.org) is another great step in the right direction and I commend whoever is responsible for continuing this project.


EDIT: Not implying that your squadron's museum is of "low quality" just saying in general. :)
If you have ten thousand regulations you destroy all respect for the law. - Winston Churchill

mynetdude

Quote from: jimmydeanno on March 17, 2008, 05:36:22 PM
Quote from: mynetdude on March 17, 2008, 05:30:34 PM
We already have a history book (#2), NHQ has advertised it for quite some time awhile back the book is like $75-$80 or something.  I believe it was to celebrate the 65-66 years of CAP.  An interactive DVD would be better, because you can take it with you to public conferences/gatherings related to military/aviation.

I remember them advertising them a few years back, but hadn't actually heard of anyone who ordered one got it yet. Great step in the right direction if it has been published.

Quote
My squadron has its own museum, in the wrong place IMHO... I hope one day it gets moved.  I think its a great idea that museums add CAP to their collection of displays too.

I can imagine that this would be a great achievement for us, however it would of course need to be of museum quality - we wouldn't be able to put up foam board displays with sharpie captions for the photos in the Smithsonian.

QuoteAlso another idea is to have a website strictly dedicated to the CAP history, I believe there is one that exists... I can't remember where though NHQ had a link to it from cap.gov as this website needs more exposure/promotion.

The Civil Air Patrol Online Museum (www.caphistory.org) is another great step in the right direction and I commend whoever is responsible for continuing this project.


EDIT: Not implying that your squadron's museum is of "low quality" just saying in general. :)

well I wouldn't call it museum quality but I think it is in the "middle" I'll have to take a photograph and show it here sometime :).

An interactive DVD would be the next step IMHO, heck you can put caphistory.org right onto a DVD too there are applications (free) that will literally put a whole website onto a CD/DVD for you and it will run like a website right off the internet without internet.

So whoever is responsible for that project may want to consider expanding that option to include caphistory.org into an interactive DVD as well.  I have been wanting to do something like that for the KC-97 we host every weekend however we are not really able to do it because we cannot expect the equipment to be protected while it is stored on the static display KC-97 so I have not figured that out yet and if I do... I'd add a bit of tidbit about CAP at the end of the KC-97 DVD or something.

mikeylikey

The AF Museum at Wright-Patterson in Ohio did have ONE CAP plane hanging, and a board describing what the plane was, but not getting into what CAP was. 
I think we should pressure the AF Museum to give us a room where we can set-up a huge display.  There are rooms that just sit empty there! 

When I asked a few months ago about when the CAP plane would be returned to the rafters the woman told me never!  I was shocked.

If we did get space we can do CAP history since 1941 to present.  What would be even cooler would to include CAP in already existing displays around the museum.  Say the Army Air Force display case of 1941 would have a few CAP items thrown in with it and a sign about what they are.  Then the 1947 Air Force beginnings case would also get some CAP material thrown alongside with a descriptive chart.  You can do that in almost every single display case up to today.  This would alert the non-knowing person that CAP is a part of the AF team.  At the end we can get recruiting brochures to sit alongside the AF recruiting material.  This could be a huge opportunity for the organization.  However, I live 5 hours away from Wright-Patt, and would rather see NHQ take the lead on this!   ;D
What's up monkeys?

James Shaw

There are actually about a dozen people who work within the historical group. We all have and do different jobs. There are some who actually do nothing but scan and archive the materials. The biggest problem we have is funding. The entire budget for the Historical group is about $7000 per year. That is supposed to cover everything. I personally spent about $6000 last year. I am in the process of creating a online CAP archives kinf of like the CAPhistory website but with more data and pictures. The biggest hitter is the amount of time it takes to store, sort, archive, scan, copy, and all of the other stuff. We also do have a couple of historical exhibits that can be loaned out to people and all they have to do is pay the cost of shipping. I myslef have alot of posters for reproduction as well as 60 tracks of CAP music to share. You can keep an eye on the SERCAP.US website for updates. It is a lengthy process but it is being done.
Jim Shaw
USN: 1987-1992
GANG: 1996-1998
CAP:2000 - Current
USCGA:2018 - Current
SGAUS: 2017 - Current

NIN

IIRC, there WAS a big CAP display at the Air Force Museum..

BITD (and the last time I was at Wright-Patt was for the 1991 encampment, so my memory is.. faded.. ) the CAP display consisted of an CAP L-3 over a floor-level display that I seem to recall was the Civil Air Patrol "Hall of Honor" (busts of CAP luminaries..)

According to the Air Force Museum's website, the CAP J-3 is hanging in the "Presidential Gallery" which is the old "annex" facility at Wright-Patt.  No clue where the Hall of Honor may have gone.

Darin Ninness, Col, CAP
I have no responsibilities whatsoever
I like to have Difficult Adult Conversations™
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2007-2024 by NIN. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

mynetdude

Quote from: caphistorian on March 17, 2008, 06:46:25 PM
There are actually about a dozen people who work within the historical group. We all have and do different jobs. There are some who actually do nothing but scan and archive the materials. The biggest problem we have is funding. The entire budget for the Historical group is about $7000 per year. That is supposed to cover everything. I personally spent about $6000 last year. I am in the process of creating a online CAP archives kinf of like the CAPhistory website but with more data and pictures. The biggest hitter is the amount of time it takes to store, sort, archive, scan, copy, and all of the other stuff. We also do have a couple of historical exhibits that can be loaned out to people and all they have to do is pay the cost of shipping. I myslef have alot of posters for reproduction as well as 60 tracks of CAP music to share. You can keep an eye on the SERCAP.US website for updates. It is a lengthy process but it is being done.

Indeed history is no easy feat especially when it comes to archiving.  Although I am curious though if an interactive DVD was to be made and sold for about $30-$40 apiece you could easily cover the costs of reproduction which might be $15-$25 and every $5-$10 received would go into a CAP National historian fund to cover other costs as well.

jimmydeanno

Quote from: caphistorian on March 17, 2008, 06:46:25 PM
The biggest problem we have is funding. The entire budget for the Historical group is about $7000 per year.

Yep, I can see that as a huge obstacle for this sort of thing.  Perhaps we could take the NBs travel budget and apply it towards preserving and promoting our history. :)

They need to give you guys seed money of like $.5 million to get some professionally done exhibits, etc done.  When you are barely keeping yourself above water with the amount of scanning, etc nothing "extra" can get accomplished.  

I know the "where will the money come from" discussion will come out, but this is where the NB is supposed to come into play - instead of being a drain financially on the organization they should be bringing in funds from donors for things like this.

I hate when this organization is penny wise and pound foolish.
If you have ten thousand regulations you destroy all respect for the law. - Winston Churchill

Eclipse

Frankly I am about done with the "little yellow airplanes", our history is important, but should not be included in every press release and brochure.

We need to focus the effort and energy on today's operations and future growth, which would kill this "best kept secret" problem and in turn generate more interest in our history.

There is also the issue that we still literally have members who >flew< those airplanes, so unlike most of the MC$' ours history hasn't "aged".


"That Others May Zoom"

Eagle400

Quote from: Eclipse on March 17, 2008, 06:56:16 PM
Frankly I am about done with the "little yellow airplanes", our history is important, but should not be included in every press release and brochure.

I'm with Eclipse on that one. 

If CAP's history is included in every press release and brochure, it's more than just repetitive; it hints that the focus may be more on past accomplishments than current ones.

If someone wants to know about CAP's history, they can always go to cap.gov.

Quote from: Eclipse on March 17, 2008, 06:56:16 PMWe need to focus the effort and energy on today's operations and future growth, which would kill this "best kept secret" problem and in turn generate more interest in our history.

Agreed.  CAP also needs to reach out to news outlets more frequently and better-advertise its activities.  I'd like to see CAP on the national news for more than just things like the Fossett search; I'd like to see other searches featured as well.  SAREX's and cadet activities wouldn't hurt, either.    

Quote from: Eclipse on March 17, 2008, 06:56:16 PMThere is also the issue that we still literally have members who >flew< those airplanes, so unlike most of the MC$' ours history hasn't "aged".

What is an MC$?

RiverAux

Yes the CAP "History" book is out.  Its really more of a collection of old photographs more than a real organizational history (I gave a better review somewhere on CAPTalk).

Eclipse


"That Others May Zoom"

A.Member

Quote from: jimmydeanno on March 17, 2008, 05:25:04 PM
Any other ideas?  Thoughts?
Make a quality, feature-length "Hollywood" movie FTMFW!  :)
"For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return."

DesertFlyer

One thing we can do at the local level is preserve the history of our own squadrons, and write squadron histories. Our squadron was just chartered last year and I am in the process of writing an official history of the first year and the activities that led up to the formal chartering. Someday, someone will find it interesting to learn how a bunch of folks came together, contacted CAP, and went through the process of establishing a new squadron.

Since we got started, I've heard from several local residents that there was a CAP squadron here back in the 1960s and 1970s. Unfortunately, there seem to be no records whatsoever remaining from those days, so that history is essentially lost.

I got sensitized to such problems a few years ago when the local ham-radio club asked me to write its history. There were some records in the files, and I was able to talk to and solicit written recollections from some of the old-timers. After more than a year's effort, I was able to produce a reasonably extensive history, but there were many years for which there are no records, and those gaps still bother me. When we started the CAP squadron, I was determined that, if I could help it, our squadron's history would be preserved for those who follow.

Lt Col Dave Finley, CAP
Socorro Composite Squadron
New Mexico Wing

Semper Fidelis -- Semper Vigilans

RiverAux

A squadron in my wing started a few years ago and got some information from NHQ about the former unit and got chartered with the same number as the old one.  I've gotten lists of former squadron commanders from NHQ before as well.  I think they've got some files there at Maxwell with each squadron's org changes in it. 

Eclipse

Unfortunately they are not complete.

We have photographic and documentary evidence of Palwaukee's history back to March 1942, which would make it one of CAP's oldest units, but unfortunately the furthest back NHQ can go is the '70's when a lot of charters were redone.

"That Others May Zoom"

RiverAux

You know, another unit I know about sent in some copies of newspaper articles from when the unit was formed in 1942 and got a new charter issued from NHQ based on that.   This was only a few years ago.  However, the unit was in continuous existence during the whole period so it was pretty legit. 

Somewhat unfortunately (I know its not a major issue) CAP doesn't have any real standards for unit lineage.   

Johnny Yuma

Frankly, we pretty much have failed, organization wide, in promotion of CAP's very existence, much less it's history.

I'd like to see us in a massive promotional campaign telling America HERE WE ARE than espousing what we've done 60 years ago.
"And Saint Attila raised the Holy Hand Grenade up on high saying, "Oh Lord, Bless us this Holy Hand Grenade, and with it smash our enemies to tiny bits. And the Lord did grin, and the people did feast upon the lambs, and stoats, and orangutans, and breakfast cereals, and lima bean-"

" Skip a bit, brother."

"And then the Lord spake, saying: "First, shalt thou take out the holy pin. Then shalt thou count to three. No more, no less. "Three" shall be the number of the counting, and the number of the counting shall be three. "Four" shalt thou not count, and neither count thou two, execpting that thou then goest on to three. Five is RIGHT OUT. Once the number three, being the third number be reached, then lobbest thou thy Holy Hand Grenade to-wards thy foe, who, being naughty in my sight, shall snuffit. Amen."

Armaments Chapter One, verses nine through twenty-seven:

Major Carrales

Local units should do their best to preserve Unit history.  There are lots of local/regional archives at Universities and museums that exist to preserve the old documents.

A Unit history is a great project for cadets and a local historian.
"We have been given the power to change CAP, let's keep the momentum going!"

Major Joe Ely "Sparky" Carrales, CAP
Commander
Coastal Bend Cadet Squadron
SWR-TX-454

Smithsonia

OK Let's think of some ideas for CAP History Promotion.
1 small article on Wing/Squadron Website include old pix and 250-500 words
2. Every Colonel/50 year member/record 1/2 hour interview. Edit to the
best length... put it on YouTube or CAP Website. I'm doing this project and calling
it "The Colonels." I videotape the 1st one next month.
3. I'm building a set of 5 min/quicktime programs called CAP"Old School" The first 5 are shot but not yet edited. That series is called 1943 Briefings. Flight Gear, Introduction to the L2, HandPropping, Run up, Once around the Patch. I own a L2
so I've got the "right stuff."-- Literally but not in the Tom Wolfe figurative sense.
4. Trackdown the old guys for the ES Stories. I've got a Colorado Team of 6-7 members with 315 SARS, 85 Saves, over 1000 ELTs, The largest single mission
save in US/CAP History, and 130plus "finds". I'll have their story on the CO/WG Website next month. AND its a hell-of-a-story. I'm tracking down some of their Saves this month and getting the Old ES Team Together with their saves from 30 years ago. I did 90percent of the research on the Web.
How's that? Good Luck!!
With regards;
1st Lt. Ed O'Brien
Denver CO
Black Sheep Sq Historian.
With regards;
ED OBRIEN

mikeylikey

^ Sounds good.  Welcome to CAPTALk by the way!   :)
What's up monkeys?

mynetdude

Quote from: Smithsonia on March 20, 2008, 01:27:45 AM
OK Let's think of some ideas for CAP History Promotion.
1 small article on Wing/Squadron Website include old pix and 250-500 words
2. Every Colonel/50 year member/record 1/2 hour interview. Edit to the
best length... put it on YouTube or CAP Website. I'm doing this project and calling
it "The Colonels." I videotape the 1st one next month.
3. I'm building a set of 5 min/quicktime programs called CAP"Old School" The first 5 are shot but not yet edited. That series is called 1943 Briefings. Flight Gear, Introduction to the L2, HandPropping, Run up, Once around the Patch. I own a L2
so I've got the "right stuff."-- Literally but not in the Tom Wolfe figurative sense.
4. Trackdown the old guys for the ES Stories. I've got a Colorado Team of 6-7 members with 315 SARS, 85 Saves, over 1000 ELTs, The largest single mission
save in US/CAP History, and 130plus "finds". I'll have their story on the CO/WG Website next month. AND its a hell-of-a-story. I'm tracking down some of their Saves this month and getting the Old ES Team Together with their saves from 30 years ago. I did 90percent of the research on the Web.
How's that? Good Luck!!
With regards;
1st Lt. Ed O'Brien
Denver CO
Black Sheep Sq Historian.

That I'd be interested in looking at when all this materializes :)

Smithsonia

Thank you for the kindly welcome. I've been lurking for some time. Other ideas...
1. If you've got a prewar or wartime Luscombe or Taylorcraft on your field... chances are better than even that the plane was used by the Civilian Pilot Training Program/USAAF/or CAP. You should talk to the owner. Likely, this owner won't know because the CPT/CAP logs are Squadron based not individual plane based. BUT you can track it down on the web from different sources. Taylorcraft.org and Luscombe Club can be of service.
2. Many WW2 and Post WW 2 Trainers/O-birds/Liaison planes were in the CAP. Look for L19s, T34s, and 180HP-172s... again, talk to the owner.
3. Gun Clubs, American Legion Halls, Old Soldier Homes, Vet Hospitals, American Legion Posts are full of good stories. Check it out. Last week I found a completely new Tuskegee Airman Post WW2 Story. A new Iwo Jima story. I'll get back to those soon.
In some Squadrons Historian is the last place job. You can change that. When you give a briefing or presentation... keep it short (BE BRIEF)and keep it potent. Work on it. Boring history is lost history. Be proud of CAP history. If you've got the story you'll get the glory. My favorite thing is to make old guys cry. When you make them the hero. When you tell their story. When you care about the storyteller's craft... you'll make'em cry and they'll love you for it. God loves historians and so do old guys with pent up stories to tell. Listen, be inquizitive, and keep good notes... and most importantly write everyday. Well written emails are good practice. Write and write and write... that way when you've got a history to wirte... it's easier by a nautical mile. Come on you Historians rally to the sound of gun fire and make them old guys cry.
With regards;
1st Lt. Ed O'Brien
Denver, CO
Black Sheep Squadron
With regards;
ED OBRIEN

Gunner C

Quote from: Smithsonia on March 20, 2008, 05:34:44 AM
Thank you for the kindly welcome. I've been lurking for some time. Other ideas...
1. If you've got a prewar or wartime Luscombe or Taylorcraft on your field... chances are better than even that the plane was used by the Civilian Pilot Training Program/USAAF/or CAP. You should talk to the owner. Likely, this owner won't know because the CPT/CAP logs are Squadron based not individual plane based. BUT you can track it down on the web from different sources. Taylorcraft.org and Luscombe Club can be of service.
2. Many WW2 and Post WW 2 Trainers/O-birds/Liaison planes were in the CAP. Look for L19s, T34s, and 180HP-172s... again, talk to the owner.
3. Gun Clubs, American Legion Halls, Old Soldier Homes, Vet Hospitals, American Legion Posts are full of good stories. Check it out. Last week I found a completely new Tuskegee Airman Post WW2 Story. A new Iwo Jima story. I'll get back to those soon.
In some Squadrons Historian is the last place job. You can change that. When you give a briefing or presentation... keep it short (BE BRIEF)and keep it potent. Work on it. Boring history is lost history. Be proud of CAP history. If you've got the story you'll get the glory. My favorite thing is to make old guys cry. When you make them the hero. When you tell their story. When you care about the storyteller's craft... you'll make'em cry and they'll love you for it. God loves historians and so do old guys with pent up stories to tell. Listen, be inquizitive, and keep good notes... and most importantly write everyday. Well written emails are good practice. Write and write and write... that way when you've got a history to wirte... it's easier by a nautical mile. Come on you Historians rally to the sound of gun fire and make them old guys cry.
With regards;
1st Lt. Ed O'Brien
Denver, CO
Black Sheep Squadron

This would be fascinating to read.  One note: Only choose colonels who have been around 20+ years - there's a boatload of them that have only been around less than 10 (friends of HWWNBM).  They won't have that much to offer.

However, there's some colonels who have been around since the 1950s who would have a treasure trove of experiences. That would be great!  We need to reconnect with the past of CAP - regain traditions and get rid of the fads.

GC

Smithsonia

Regarding whom to speak with and how long they've been in CAP. Re: "The Colonels" Project. I've decided that "time in" is worthless. Some guys flew 100 missions in Vietnam, Desert Storm, Bailed out of planes, rescued at sea, looked for Katrina Survivors, Found Steve Fosset but forgot to report it... on and on... but haven't been around CAP that long... pick stories. Stephen Ambrose did large arc stories (D-DAY, Lewis and Clark, Building of the Trans-Continental Railroad, etc.) but what he wanted was the smaller human interior narrative that gave the large arc story: context, grit, human scale, character, achievement.
You can go for the small story. Just tell it well and it'll become history. "I shook Charles Lindberg's hand." "The ELT mission with guns drawn." "On fire, On Final"
All could be great stories told by "the right stuff writer." Do a few and people will come to you. You'll talk to the VFW hall and the Korean War Vets will tell you about
flying O1-Liaison Planes in Korea... and you'll have a piece of history you can tie-into when YOU write the story of the little planes that your squadron flew in the 50s... on and on. Storytelling begets storytelling. It is one of the truly virtuous cycles of life. God may have been a Flying Tiger's "co-pilot" (literary reference) but really God is an historian... ever read the Bible? He created all the stuff... then told people to write it up! Even the small stories!!! (No theological content here... just embelishment for point making.)
With regards;
1st Lt. Ed O'Brien
Denver, CO.
Black Sheep Sq.
With regards;
ED OBRIEN

Smithsonia

There's a good and growing reason to embrace CAP History and get the "Historians"
off of their butts. More and more of what we do is OPSEC Protected. If we can't talk about it today. If we can't write it up and present it now... it'll get lost later. SO...
1. Do Drug intercept/Border Patrol Liaison/Flight Caps for Dignitary, etc. history's that you can't release, but -- In 30 years those will be the meat on the CAPs Hisotry  bones of today. If you're willing to keep it quiet... today's Mission folks with these stories will talk to you.
We'll need these stories one day. Write them up now. Put them away for later reading and release. That's something the PAOs can't do. Being that Big Saves are now rare and we still need to justify our/CAPs existence...
2.  Old Histories (is there any other kind?) are more important than ever. Basically we're planes in search of a mission. By telling the ol' guys rememberences of their missions -- we're paying homage to a wonderful volunteer, providing inspiration for cadets and new members, and justifying our continued existence in funding and public support.
Meaning -- Historian IS THE MOST IMPORTANT DESK JOB YOU CAN HAVE IN CAP.
Others may disagree but since the historians control the memory banks -- and therefore get the last word -- and that word is that YOU (Mr. and Ms. Historian) can have meaningful impact in funding, public awareness, recruitment, retention, morale, and Global Warming (slight exageration to keep your attention) I can argue all day with you about your disagreement with my statement capitalized above but don't intend on doing so... I got histories to write.
With regards;
1st Lt. Ed O'Brien
Denver, CO.
Black Sheep Squadron
With regards;
ED OBRIEN

James Shaw

#28
Quote from: Smithsonia on March 27, 2008, 03:18:32 PM
There's a good and growing reason to embrace CAP History and get the "Historians"
off of their butts. More and more of what we do is OPSEC Protected. If we can't talk about it today. If we can't write it up and present it now... it'll get lost later. SO...
1. Do Drug intercept/Border Patrol Liaison/Flight Caps for Dignitary, etc. history's that you can't release, but -- In 30 years those will be the meat on the CAPs Hisotry  bones of today. If you're willing to keep it quiet... today's Mission folks with these stories will talk to you.
We'll need these stories one day. Write them up now. Put them away for later reading and release. That's something the PAOs can't do. Being that Big Saves are now rare and we still need to justify our/CAPs existence...
2.  Old Histories (is there any other kind?) are more important than ever. Basically we're planes in search of a mission. By telling the ol' guys rememberences of their missions -- we're paying homage to a wonderful volunteer, providing inspiration for cadets and new members, and justifying our continued existence in funding and public support.
Meaning -- Historian IS THE MOST IMPORTANT DESK JOB YOU CAN HAVE IN CAP.
Others may disagree but since the historians control the memory banks -- and therefore get the last word -- and that word is that YOU (Mr. and Ms. Historian) can have meaningful impact in funding, public awareness, recruitment, retention, morale, and Global Warming (slight exageration to keep your attention) I can argue all day with you about your disagreement with my statement capitalized above but don't intend on doing so... I got histories to write.
With regards;
1st Lt. Ed O'Brien
Denver, CO.
Black Sheep Squadron

Let me first welcome you to CAPTalk. Now let me let you know from a Historical perspective what I think about your comments about historians. We as historians do not wait for something to come our way. Just because you do not see us jumping around and screaming about history does not mean we do not work on it. There are about a dozen people who are spending their time scanning, archiving, and trying to share our history with the members. We run into problems just like everyone else. We as a group have a budget of $7000 for everything we do in a year. We fund most of the stuff ourselves. We buy and collect this stuff so that other CAP people can hopefully enjoy it as well. I have spent $5000 alone this year on my CAP related collection. I do not get to claim this on my taxes as a donation because I have it in my home. I pay for climate controlled storage of my own collection of historical documents I have saved from individuals who sold it to me and wanted to throw it away.

I have also made a committment to make over 200 CD's for Wing/Region/National people to help them share the information. Obviously you have not worked with many of our historians if you think we sit behind a desk collecting dust. I can assure you that is far from the truth. Please take a look at the projects I have worked on  in the past year and tell me where we as a group dont do any work.

Accomplishments of the Past Year! Major  James L. Shaw Jr. CAP

1)Purchased (at own expense) copy of Coastal Patrol Base 21 History Book. Scanned, cropped, and enhanced all 120 pages and then put into PDF format for Historical Archiving and Research. Sent copies to current Base 21 Commander both on CD and printed and bound copies for their use. They lost theirs about 20 years ago. Copies of CD sent to National Curator, National Historian, National Commander, CAP Historical Foundation, and other historians. Reprinted copies of book and offered for donation to CAP Historical Committee. Estimate about $500 raised to date from project.

2)    Arranged 1st GAWG Conference Historical Display. The display consisted of the national collection from Aberdeen MD and escorted by Lt. Col. Bill Schell the National Curator of over 2000+ items, private collection of Lt. Col. Todd Engelmen from Warner Robins GA with 3000+ pieces, and my private collection of 3000+ items for display. Raised over $500 dollars for the Historical Foundation through book "donations" of the book From Maine to Mexico.

3)   Led the effort to have Col. Ben Stone nominated for the GA Aviation Hall of Fame. He is on the voting list for inclusion. Compiled major oral and visual history of Ben from 1941 to 2005. Scanned all 220 pages of his records for Historical Archiving and Research. Did 8 hours of interviews and several stories about him.  Research has been used for several historical projects.

4)   Have contributed articles about CAP to the Company of Military Historians book and magazine. Articles are sent to all members as well as hundreds of college and university history professors.

5)   Submitting monthly news articles for SER news as well as a historical blog on several CAP related websites.

6)   Created a clipart CD of vintage and modern CAP clipart from 1941 to present. This CD has over 600MB of clipart and photos. CD was shared with regional historians and many squadrons.

7)   Created a series of posters for NHQ about the history and requirements of the many phases of cadet and senior CAP achievements. Also created safety poster that was shared through NHQ to Safety Officers all over the US.

8)   Contributed the second largest group of Photos and other Media Related items for use on the CAPhistory.org website. Have also continued to donate other items for use on the website. Listed as a major contributor on the patrons page.

9)   Collected all currently know copies of CAP music related items. Purchased original 45 and 33 1/3 RPM's. Took 26 CAP "Public Service Announcements" used in the 1960, 15 "Spot Announcements" celebrating the 25th Annv of CAP from the late 60's and, 6 CAP "Music Capsules" and converted them to digital. Compiled all of the music" designed and packaged for CAP Historical Committee" to be offered as a fund-raiser. Copies of CD sent to National Curator, National Historian, National Commander, CAP Historical Foundation, and other historians (around 47).

10)   Scanned and put into digital format the collectors catalogs of CAP insignias. Distributed to historians due to the non-availability of the books. Around 500 pages shared for easy access.

11)   Was squadron Commander of GA805 as additional duty until May of 2006. Spent 3 years as Squadron Commander of Merry Acres Cadet Squadron (DDR). Gave up command due to work constraints.

12)   Flew as Counter Drug Qualified Observer with Lt. Col. McCracken (GP4 Commander) for the GAWG.

13)   Currently serving as Assistant National Historian under Col. Len Blascovich. My duties with SER are considered additional duties.

14)   Designed    
Incident Commander badge (NB approved)
Drug Demand Reduction badge (NB approved)
CAP Achievement Medal (NB approved)

16   Completed audio-book version of the book Flying Minute Men by Neprud. Have recorded the entire book in digital format. Estimation of about 400 hours of record and editing time spent. The master recording is being shared with a publishing company to produce it. Took over a year to record. This was a MAJOR project for CAP history.

17   Project Leader for CAP Memorial dedicated to those who have lost their lives in the line of duty. Spent $1000 of own money to fund project. Did all custom glass panels myself at no cost to CAP saving $2000.

18   Have archived over 3GB of historical documents I have purchased.

19   Currently working on CAPHistorian website to become online document repository.

20   Currently working on converting the 1970's CAP movie "Accent on Youth" from 16MM film to DVD. To be donated to CAP for historical use and possibly fundraising.

21   Currently CO-President of the Medal of Valor Association.

Semper Vigilans
Proud to be a Historian!!

Disabled smileys - MIKE
Jim Shaw
USN: 1987-1992
GANG: 1996-1998
CAP:2000 - Current
USCGA:2018 - Current
SGAUS: 2017 - Current

Smithsonia

Major Shaw:
I'm happy to meet you too, sir.
I assume that your resume' is in response to my "Historians get off your butts" comment. That comment was/is not directed at you. You sir, are doing great work! WE all need help. We all pick our own pockets -- so we can do CAP History.

Currently many Wings have no/few/mostly untrained historians. No matter -- I think it's the greatest job in CAP... and hope to translate this enthusiam into similar minded
folks who'll join you and me and happily lose money with us. I think for all the right reasons listed in my previous post (see earlier pages) it is precisely the "most underappreciated" bang for the buck PD group in the CAP Cadre. There's only one way to promote it and that is to talk it up, rev it up, promote it up.

Please keep my number handy email {{{ed@e-obrien.com))) we're doing some nifty stuff and we're happy to share. That way we don't have to reinvent the wheel anew with each new administration/Wing Commander/Historian etc. Lack of contiinuity can be a "history buzz killer."

I'll have some things for you and Col. Blascovich soon. I've just finished a lengthy piece 4-5000 words article, 14 pictures, 6 maps, 25 accompanying articles, and 3 hours of video interviews, and a collection of TV News packages from the period. It's undergoing fact checking, editorial review, and I'm waiting for a few more pictures to come in. It should be ready within a month. "The Biggest Save" in CAP History. If you'd like a copy it's yours. I'm for the making history and Historians telling the stories. Good luck to you too.
With regards;
1Lt. Ed O'Brien
Denver, CO.
Black Sheep Squadron
With regards;
ED OBRIEN