Family WWII CAP Service... a 12 year revival...

Started by PhoenixRisen, November 13, 2020, 06:20:14 pm

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PhoenixRisen

Adding a few new items to share on an old topic...

Twelve years ago, I posted this thread after finding actual video of family members (great aunt and great uncle) that were in CAP during WWII.  My now-late grandmother told me about their involvement in CAP around that same time, after I had been in CAP myself for 5 years as a cadet.

Earlier this year, I begun to search for more information on their involvement in hopes that I would be able to get them both posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal.  This was eventually approved for both of them, and once COVID settles down, we will resume planning the ceremony.

Two of the items my family has found are below.  One is a Staff Officer Appointment certificate for my great uncle, and the other is a photo that includes my great aunt (second from right).  These are rough phone photos... I'm waiting on scanned copies.  Finally, the third photo is a combined shadow box that my extended family had for both of these relatives.  It includes items from both of their CAP service, as well as other service they performed (Army, American Red Cross?, etc.).

IMG-1111" border="0 IMG-1183" border="0 IMG-1184" border="0

One thing I'd love to get more info on is the rank structure from back then as it relates to their service and duties.  From the photos I've seen, my great uncle was a Master Sergeant before receiving this appointment to Second Lieutenant.  My great aunt also appears to be wearing Warrant Officer insignia, which also appears to be in the shadow box.  I don't believe either were ever pilots, and not much is known about what they actually did... I figure this may not be much to go on.

I hope everyone finds this interesting!

wacapgh

According to my copy of "Civil Air Patrol Handbook 1944 Edition"

The CAP Service Ribbon "the color of the stripe  to denote total years of service of continuous service since enlistment in CAP and total number of hours actually devoted to CAP work including both ground and flying duties and the volunteer work of Wing units as well as duties on operations assignments."

a Green stripes - Minimum 250 actual working hours and minimum of one year enlistment in CAP.

b Red stripes - Minimum 500 hours and 18 months enlistment in CAP.

c Blue stripes - Minimum 1000 hours and two years enlistment in CAP.

You wore one ribbon at a time, replacing it with the next higher award. Red replaces Green, and finally Blue replaces Red. The propeller disc has one blade pointing up, so the Blue(?) ribbon on the right should be flipped around.

The Grade system is just as complicated then as is now. The short version is NCO grades are tied to "Ratings" each requiring completion of specific training courses for each rating.
Example -  Rating 1, Private:
Course
31-1 Civil Air Patrol - 3 hours
32-1 Courtesy and Discipline -3 hours
32-2A Infantry Drill - 5 hours
32-3 Safeguarding Military Information - 1 hour
32-4 Articles of War - 1 hour
Any other CAP courses 12

For a Master Sergeant, 225 hours to earn Rating 5 and one of the following -  Private Pilot or higher; A&E Mechanic; Parachute Rigger; Radiotelegraph or Radiotelephone Class 2; Radio Amateur; or CAA Ground Instructor.

A Warrant Officer has to meet all of the above plus either a Restricted Radiotelephone license or higher, or Pilot with at least 200 hours total and 15 or more hours of CAP flight training.

Officer grades were tied directly to what position you were holding. Second Lieutenant as described on the certificate was for being assigned as a Squadron staff officer. A Flight Leader or an Assistant Group Staff Officer could also be appointed as a 2nd Lt. You revert back to your "permanent" grade when the assignment ends.

Jester

Quote from: wacapgh on November 13, 2020, 11:44:23 pmAccording to my copy of "Civil Air Patrol Handbook 1944 Edition"


Is this a digital version by chance?

Brit_in_CAP

Quote from: Jester on November 19, 2020, 04:52:45 pm
Quote from: wacapgh on November 13, 2020, 11:44:23 pmAccording to my copy of "Civil Air Patrol Handbook 1944 Edition"


Is this a digital version by chance?

I'll second that question!  Fascinating read, I suspect.

PhoenixRisen

Quote from: wacapgh on November 13, 2020, 11:44:23 pmAccording to my copy of "Civil Air Patrol Handbook 1944 Edition"

Thank you for the information!!  Seconding others here... if this is something that you have in a digital copy... I'd love to see it!

I'm quite intrigued by the description of the Warrant Officer rank.... if that truly is what is on my great aunt's collar, that is crazy awesome!

NIN

November 19, 2020, 10:46:27 pm #5 Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 02:28:11 am by NIN
*EDITED*

I'm reasonably certain that the OP's intent for this topic wasn't a catfight between a condescending know-it-all or a pedantic ingenue.

I've split the posts that were off topic and I've unlocked the thread.

Keep it on topic, or find a way to take it to email or something.

Carry on.
Darin Ninness, Col, CAP
Wing Dude
I like to have Difficult Adult Conversations™
Nothing posted on CAPTalk should be considered policy unless otherwise stated
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2007-2020 by NIN. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

Brit_in_CAP

Personally, I found this very interesting.  I never ceased to be amazed by the things that turn up from this type of search.

I was able to find my Father's cadet squadron numbers from his days in the Air Training Corps, around the time that the OPs parents were in CAP.  Both organizations were founded around the same time, albeit with different missions.  We also found a picture of the squadron.

The numbers were pinned on the collars of their WW1-style uniform blouses!

I donated those, and the picture we found, to the modern-day successor squadron, for their history table. 

Good luck with the rest of your search - well worth the effort!

754837

November 20, 2020, 08:08:41 pm #7 Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 09:50:01 pm by 754837 Reason: trying to upload attachment
I found a PDF of the manual... am trying to upload.

PhoenixRisen

Any luck with the upload?  I'm not seeing anything.

wacapgh

Quote from: Brit_in_CAP on November 19, 2020, 08:47:01 pm
Quote from: Jester on November 19, 2020, 04:52:45 pm
Quote from: wacapgh on November 13, 2020, 11:44:23 pmAccording to my copy of "Civil Air Patrol Handbook 1944 Edition"


Is this a digital version by chance?

I'll second that question!  Fascinating read, I suspect.

Actual hard copy. All of about 1/4" thick.  The "Big Blue Binder" I bought as a Cadet in the late 70's was about 4 inches thick.

754837

Quote from: PhoenixRisen on November 23, 2020, 08:36:36 pmAny luck with the upload?  I'm not seeing anything.

Negative - I tried several times with no luck.  I might not have rights to upload a document that large.

754837


jeders

Quote from: 754837 on November 24, 2020, 02:34:24 pm
Quote from: PhoenixRisen on November 23, 2020, 08:36:36 pmAny luck with the upload?  I'm not seeing anything.

Negative - I tried several times with no luck.  I might not have rights to upload a document that large.

The best way to share something like that here is to put it in something like a Google drive or Dropbox and then share the shareable link.
If you are confident in you abilities and experience, whether someone else is impressed is irrelevant. - Eclipse