PREVIEW: CAPR 40-1: Senior Member Education and Training (FORMERLY PD)

Started by JC004, July 29, 2020, 10:12:28 pm

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JC004

FOR PREVIEW: CAPR 40-1: Senior Member Education and Training Program (FORMERLY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT)

This replaces CAPR 50-17, on 04 August.

Professional Development Officers will now be Education and Training Officers.  Per Colonel Aye, this is to bring terminology in line with the rest of the DAF. 

https://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/members/publications/regulations-for-preview

Eclipse

Still talking about using a 2a in 2020.  Geez.

Otherwise, this doc seems to wander in and out of areas it doesn't need to
in an effort to "answer all questions", but that's a nitpick.

Looks like the transition to the Correspondence Air Patrol is nearly complete.

I also think that looking to put ES training under this same umbrella, in an affectation
of the Air University model, is an interesting idea, but is going to be an uphill battle,
since that will put people not involved in ES in the position of bulldogging progress and updates.

Not saying it won't work, or isn't needed, just sayin'. 

For me, personally, it's largely moot, though it appears that if I was interested I could complete
level V without getting into arguments.



etodd

Quote from: Eclipse on July 29, 2020, 10:39:09 pmI also think that looking to put ES training under this same umbrella, in an affectation
of the Air University model, is an interesting idea, but is going to be an uphill battle,
since that will put people not involved in ES in the position of bulldogging progress and updates.


Hmmm. Always been talk of those people who work on the ES side but never "get around" to progressing in PD.  Is this someone's answer for it? Combine it all together, such that at some point they'll say MPs can't fly unless they keep progressing on the new "Education" side? 
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

Eclipse

I don't see that at all, though it's certainly needed.

I see this as an attempt to get someone to try and get the ops folks moving,
though that could be a loose interpretation.



JC004

Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 12:41:23 amI don't see that at all, though it's certainly needed.

I see this as an attempt to get someone to try and get the ops folks moving,
though that could be a loose interpretation.

Yes, Colonel Aye did say one of the goals was to get SMs to progress who don't currently because they dedicate all their time to an NCSA or whatever else that can eat up all your time - and your schedule when it comes to the ability to take weekend and week-long courses.

Luis R. Ramos

When the old PD program was correctly and without questions defined, now we have to get used to a completely ambiguous program and definitions. There are no explanations on how are these requirements to be met. Yes, there are few definitions and explanations. But no explanation on how to get those members working on a specific level to the new specific, equivalent level.
Squadron Safety Officer
Squadron Communication Officer
Squadron Emergency Services Officer

jeders

Quote from: Luis R. Ramos on July 30, 2020, 01:28:44 pmWhen the old PD program was correctly and without questions defined, now we have to get used to a completely ambiguous program and definitions. There are no explanations on how are these requirements to be met. Yes, there are few definitions and explanations. But no explanation on how to get those members working on a specific level to the new specific, equivalent level.

It all seems pretty clear cut to me. Each level has clearly defined education and service requirements (just like the old system, but with different delivery) and once those requirements are met, you get credit.
If you are confident in you abilities and experience, whether someone else is impressed is irrelevant. - Eclipse

dwb

The upside is far more flexibility in when and how you complete PD levels. Easier for people with weekend obligations. And with VOLU-trained staff, we are (hopefully) raising the quality of instruction.

The downside is that (in my opinion) it is more difficult to be a casual CAP participant, since it's not as clear-cut as "go to SLS" anymore. Now you've got this whole bingo card you need to navigate with a SQTR-style module system.

That's a 30-second analysis. This will shake out and adjust over the next few years, until we settle on what works best.

Eclipse

One unintended consequence is going to be the click-through factor, which comes with any
independent study.  On one hand, in theory, you get a universal understanding with no
local color, on the other, there's no opportunity to find out how things actually work.

Get posted as an empty shirt and never come to meetings (check someone's box).

Click-through the modules while catching up op Arrested Development in another tab.

Profit!

The difference is the empty shirts can now get bumped up without even dragging themselves
to an in-face and doomscrolling quietly in the back of the room.

A few years ago it looked like NHQ was going to be able to artificially limit the number of
FGOs through increased TIG and access to NSC, (with a published intent of suppressing the
grades to those more appropriate to duty, now that that's not a thing, not sure what
the outcome will be.

I also noticed that LV TIS is now "Group or higher", that makes it a lot easier to complete
and is somewhat interesting when you consider that LV is supposed to be for those seeking Region
and National service.  I don't think there's a group out there that doesn't have a staff hole
that can't be filled by someone checking a box.



dwb

Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 02:39:08 pmOne unintended consequence is going to be the click-through factor, which comes with any
independent study.  On one hand, in theory, you get a universal understanding with no
local color, on the other, there's no opportunity to find out how things actually work.

Get posted as an empty shirt and never come to meetings (check someone's box).

Click-through the modules while catching up op Arrested Development in another tab.

Profit!

My understanding is that this is not CBT. Meaning you will either receive instruction in person (or live virtual), or you will be part of an online cohort with participation requirements. So no, you won't just be mindlessly clicking to check boxes.

Look, there is no regulatory way to prevent your worst-case scenario. You can't measure the output of somebody assigned as Assistant Coffee Officer. What you can do is train commanders (which is part of VOLU, BTW) to not approve awards if the member is not actually participating. And if they're not actually participating, then they're probably not going through the motions of online education. So honestly I think you're complaining about a caricature of a volunteer that does not exist in the real world.

Eclipse

Quote from: dwb on July 30, 2020, 03:02:32 pmLook, there is no regulatory way to prevent your worst-case scenario. You can't measure the output of somebody assigned as Assistant Coffee Officer. What you can do is train commanders (which is part of VOLU, BTW) to not approve awards if the member is not actually participating. And if they're not actually participating, then they're probably not going through the motions of online education. So honestly I think you're complaining about a caricature of a volunteer that does not exist in the real world.

Now or future state?  Because that member absolutely exists today, fueled by all the free online conference
and training nonsense.

You can't "train commanders" to do anything when you can't require they be trained, and you can't
require they be trained when you're "lucky they showed up at all".



shuman14

I attended two conferences where they briefed the new Education program.

An in-person, Squadron leadership School, can still be conducted but you need to get with the Volunteer University to sign off on what is being taught, and if your course meets the module requirements, those respective module blocks will get a "completed" check off by the University.

So a member can go to an in-person training, or do an all online version, or a blending of the two, to complete their education. Much more flexible.

The key is coordination with Volunteer University to ensure that required modules are taught to standard when you hold an in-person training.
Joseph J. Clune
Lieutenant Colonel, Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 - 1998, 2000 - 2003, 2005 - Present     CAP: National Patron 2013 - 2014, SMWOG 2020 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000      Active Army: 2003 - 2005                                       USCGAux: 2004 - Present

Fubar

My fear is that the entire university concept, complete with a provost and deans, is being driven by someone with obviously a significant interest in this model. With most personality driven programs that pop-up in volunteer environments, these initiates often live and die by by the creator. Once the creator gets bored with it, moves on to something else, or quits entirely, these things have a habit of fizzling out.

There are folks in my wing who are already upset they had to apply to be an instructor since "I've been teaching SLS/CLC/RSC forever!" which perhaps that's the perfect reason to make them apply for the new program. Some of the worse training I've ever endured in my life, professionally or in volunteerism has been CAP lectures by know-it-alls who didn't provide one iota of value to the course.

dwb

I enthusiastically agree with vetting and evaluating VOLU instructors. And I say that as someone who has also been teaching PD classes forever. We need to raise the floor of quality on the training we're providing. You can only do that if you vet beforehand and use student and evaluator feedback to counsel (or remove) bad instructors. I'm 100% on board with that.

Creating the whole VOLU structure with all of the trappings of academia... I agree that it could go sideways over time. The first batch of key leaders are all exemplary volunteers with relevant backgrounds. But they won't be in those positions forever. Hopefully we will be able to replace them over time with people who are at least as qualified.

I am not an optimist by default. I know there will be lots of growing pains with this new system and it can definitely go off the rails. I think the concept is overall an improvement from what we have today, and hopefully we can iron out wrinkles in the first few years of implementation.

Eclipse

shuman - no one is going to do an in-face SLS, etc., again, allowed or otherwise.  I can't imagine the
tire fire that would be in regards to approvals, etc.

I agree with Fubar in regards to this looking personality driven and the risks there.
That doesn't mean it's not needed or has no value, but such is the history of CAP.
Shall we revisit the PA / Media folks of recent times? After all the turnover and promises,
it's been right back to "normal".

I also agree on the 50k level about vetting instructors, however the near-term effect,
assuming it's not permanent, is going to be reducing the pool.  If everything is online
that may be OK, but you're going to have more then a few who are current and qualified, but
have no interest in being re-vetted, so off they go.  I'm on that list.  It's cricket to
say "well too bad if you don't want to step up", but saying that doesn't' fill your empty slots.

Since presenting, per se, isn't a requirement for advancement, that's not really a factor, but
the opportunities to be "donuts and attendance guy" at these classes will be eliminated,
so being able to check that box, for members who are poor instructors but otherwise competent becomes
more difficult, if not impossible.



shuman14

Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 07:27:36 pmShuman - no one is going to do an in-face SLS, etc., again, allowed or otherwise.  I can't imagine the
tire fire that would be in regards to approvals, etc.

Really? I got the impression from the Briefings that those local SLS, CLC, etc. would continue as before, with a curriculum approved by Volunteer University, that would meet many/most of the module requirements.

I'm new to my actual CAP career and still waiting for my fingerprints to come back so I can start Level I so I guess I'll be one of the first through the new system.

That being said, this seems more flexible than the old and makes good use of prior cadet and prior military education to complete various modules. 
Joseph J. Clune
Lieutenant Colonel, Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 - 1998, 2000 - 2003, 2005 - Present     CAP: National Patron 2013 - 2014, SMWOG 2020 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000      Active Army: 2003 - 2005                                       USCGAux: 2004 - Present

dwb

Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 07:27:36 pmshuman - no one is going to do an in-face SLS, etc., again, allowed or otherwise.  I can't imagine the
tire fire that would be in regards to approvals, etc.

I can't tell if you're talking about COVID or VOLU here.

COVID, yes, will prevent in-person activities for the time being. VOLU? We fully intend to run in-person training events for Levels II-IV when it's safe to do so.

JC004

Quote from: shuman14 on July 30, 2020, 08:15:58 pm
Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 07:27:36 pmShuman - no one is going to do an in-face SLS, etc., again, allowed or otherwise.  I can't imagine the
tire fire that would be in regards to approvals, etc.

Really? I got the impression from the Briefings that those local SLS, CLC, etc. would continue as before, with a curriculum approved by Volunteer University, that would meet many/most of the module requirements.

I'm new to my actual CAP career and still waiting for my fingerprints to come back so I can start Level I so I guess I'll be one of the first through the new system.

That being said, this seems more flexible than the old and makes good use of prior cadet and prior military education to complete various modules. 

They have already provided sample training schedules to do them in the future at sq meetings, weekend events, and during week-long/summer activities. 

All of this will be briefed on the Saturday of the National Conference at 1500.  It is an all-hands seminar; no other seminars will be taking place at the same time: https://civilairpatrol2020.pathable.co/schedule-at-a-glance

Eclipse

My point was, why on earth would anyone go through the unnecessary hassle
of doing in face local classes when correspondence options are available.

Unfortunately I will not be able to make the conference due to the expense.



PHall

Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 11:47:55 pmMy point was, why on earth would anyone go through the unnecessary hassle
of doing in face local classes when correspondence options are available.

Unfortunately I will not be able to make the conference due to the expense.

You do know the Conference is virtual this year and is free, right?

Eclipse




etodd

Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 11:47:55 pmMy point was, why on earth would anyone go through the unnecessary hassle
of doing in face local classes when correspondence options are available.

One word ....... uniforms.  LOL
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

baronet68

Quote from: etodd on July 31, 2020, 12:48:11 am
Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 11:47:55 pmMy point was, why on earth would anyone go through the unnecessary hassle
of doing in face local classes when correspondence options are available.

One word ....... uniforms.  LOL

Finally... someone said the magic word!
Michael Moore, Maj, CAP
National Recruiting & Retention Manager

Fubar

Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 11:47:55 pmMy point was, why on earth would anyone go through the unnecessary hassle
of doing in face local classes when correspondence options are available.
Chatting with some folks after a meeting today and there was a significant gnashing of teeth over the loss of in-person courses. As the discussion progressed I realized it had nothing to do with the quality of instruction - it was the social aspect. These are the folks who love to attend classes mostly because it's an opportunity to hang out with their CAP friends.

Of course when the greatest value of the training is the opportunity to socialize, perhaps a complete reconstruction of the training was warranted.

Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 11:47:55 pmUnfortunately I will not be able to make the conference due to the expense.
Har, har.  8)

shuman14

Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 11:47:55 pmMy point was, why on earth would anyone go through the unnecessary hassle
of doing in face local classes when correspondence options are available.

Unfortunately I will not be able to make the conference due to the expense.

Because some people enjoy the face-to-face option, where they can ask a question and interact with an instructor and classmates. Some people just learn better that way.

There is also the social aspect of meeting new people with common interests.
Joseph J. Clune
Lieutenant Colonel, Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 - 1998, 2000 - 2003, 2005 - Present     CAP: National Patron 2013 - 2014, SMWOG 2020 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000      Active Army: 2003 - 2005                                       USCGAux: 2004 - Present

THRAWN

Quote from: shuman14 on July 31, 2020, 02:51:21 pm
Quote from: Eclipse on July 30, 2020, 11:47:55 pmMy point was, why on earth would anyone go through the unnecessary hassle
of doing in face local classes when correspondence options are available.

Unfortunately I will not be able to make the conference due to the expense.

Because some people enjoy the face-to-face option, where they can ask a question and interact with an instructor and classmates. Some people just learn better that way.

There is also the social aspect of meeting new people with common interests.

You know you can do that online, too, right?
Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
AFRCC SMC 10-97
NSS ISC 05-00
USAF SOS 2000
USAF ACSC 2011
US NWC 2016

arajca

You can still do in-person classes. It just won't be called SLS, CLC, etc. You can actually provide training member need with some planning.

jjmalott

Quote from: arajca on July 31, 2020, 05:14:45 pmYou can still do in-person classes. It just won't be called SLS, CLC, etc. You can actually provide training member need with some planning.

Correct, but all of the Vol U training, onsite or online, will have to be conducted by an approved VolU instructor ( Level 1 thru Level 5 ). All instructors have to be approved and go through the Instructor training. There is no more SLS, CLC, NSC, etc. after today.


Jeff Malott, Lt Col, CAP
National eLearning Coordinator

Phil Hirons, Jr.

Quote from: jjmalott on August 01, 2020, 03:39:35 am
Quote from: arajca on July 31, 2020, 05:14:45 pmYou can still do in-person classes. It just won't be called SLS, CLC, etc. You can actually provide training member need with some planning.

Correct, but all of the Vol U training, onsite or online, will have to be conducted by an approved VolU instructor ( Level 1 thru Level 5 ). All instructors have to be approved and go through the Instructor training. There is no more SLS, CLC, NSC, etc. after today.

What was SLS (Level II), is now 26 modules. Some of which can be granted credit based on former cadet or military status / training (and a few other reasons). A squadron / group / wing Education & Training Officer can look for what is needed across the echelon  and put together in person or online training that covers what's needed. That could be a 1/2 day, full day or more program. I've seen several people who could do 1 day of a weekend but not both and that prevented SLS, etc completion.

Wash, rinse and repeat for Level III, IV and V.

Our PD was mainly monolithic chunks (2 to 5 days) that some members could not add to their "CAP" time. Now it can be like eating an elephant, one bite at a time.

I should be finishing Instructor training Monday (3 Aug)

dwb

I completed my VOLU instructor debrief today, and already have my list of students for our first online cohort.

You can absolutely do in-person instruction (when COVID permits). That will be a more efficient way to cover the material. Instruction does not have to be a two-day event like it was in the past. It can be blended, it can be over Teams, it can be spread out over weeknights... or you can join an online cohort and do it all from the comfort of home.

Like I said earlier, the upside is the flexibility to learn how you want/need to learn. The downside is the paradox of choice: sign up for an online cohort, or wait for in-person? Do it all at once, or spread it out? Blended model or online only? How much does the socializing/networking aspect matter to you personally?

Students have to do a lot more research/planning to understand the options in front of them, rather than just signing up for SLS and being done with it.

Capt Thompson

Went in and knocked out a few modules last night to check out the new system. For those who haven't gone in yet, the new modules are in AXIS. There is a tab added with whatever level you are working on. For Level 4, there are 11 modules that you can take immediately online, the other 14 will either have to be in person or online cohort. The modules I did ranged from 20-90 minutes each, although the one marked as 90 minutes only really took maybe 40 to read all of the material and complete the two quizzes. For the online cohort training, you sign up through eServices and select the level you are working on through the Professional Levels module.
Capt Matt Thompson
Historian, Public Affairs Officer

Mitchell - 31 OCT 98 (#44670) Earhart - 1 OCT 00 (#11401)

kcebnaes

So far, it seems pretty decent. I'm working on my Level 4 as well. I got a couple modules done this morning before leaving for work. There's some good stuff in there!
Sean Beck, Maj, CAP
Great Lakes Region sUAS Officer
Various Other Thingsā„¢