April 10, 2020, 01:50:58 am

NCO or Officer?

Started by Semper_Fidelis, February 12, 2020, 12:27:44 am

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TheSkyHornet

Quote from: etodd on February 14, 2020, 12:47:47 am
Quote from: Jester on February 13, 2020, 03:31:14 pmOtherwise, just go the USCGAux route and scrap the whole thing. 

Keep it for Cadets.


There's also the ROTC structure for cadet grades where your advancement is based on your time in the program and duty position held, not test-taking and personal achievements. To stay in, you have to take the tests and complete your assignments. Grade is commensurate with rank and tasking, and you'll bounce around. One semester you might be the Operations Officer (C/O-4), and another semester, you might be the senior NCO (C/E-9). It's a rotation of duties to learn the practical application of the command structure and training facilitation.

What we need to understand is the difference between mimicking a staff structure (because that's what the real world looks like) and the needs of a training curriculum and hands-on lessons in leadership.

catrulz

I believe the idea behind the SM Grade, Bling (Badges/Ribbons/Medals/Patches), and PD methodology, is playing to the psychology behind Motivating Factors.

Spent hours on the topic of motivating a team in BNCOC. With the point being that the major motivating factors are unit cohesion, rewards and punishment.  Rewards don't necessarily have to be bling, but that's probably the easiest method for CAP.  The bling provides a method for the member to feel accomplished or fulfilled. Telling someone they did a great job and they are valued can be a motivator.   

Yes, I agree I'm sure folks like he who blocks out the sun do not need and such foolishness.  But these concepts are based on team dynamic.

Edit: Spelling

Fubar

Quote from: etodd on February 14, 2020, 12:47:47 am(But yes, I know the AF would never allow it.)

I doubt anyone at the AF would notice if we dumped their uniforms. It's definitely not up to them.

I also doubt the AF would care (because it's not up to them) if we ditched the paramilitary two-tier grade structure.

I'd become a NCO tomorrow if someone let me. I'm tired of being in charge all the time because nobody else will step up. I'd love to have a built-in excuse.

Mitchell 1969

Quote from: Phil Hirons, Jr. on February 13, 2020, 02:18:54 pmI removed Mitchell 1969's duplicate post.

Thanks. I have no idea how that happened.


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_________________
Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.

jeders

Quote from: Fubar on February 15, 2020, 02:14:50 amI'd become a NCO tomorrow if someone let me. I'm tired of being in charge all the time because nobody else will step up. I'd love to have a built-in excuse.

Trust me, being an NCO wont change the fact that no one else would step up. And if you would really sit back and let the program fail just because you don't want to be in charge, what does that say about you?
If you are confident in you abilities and experience, whether someone else is impressed is irrelevant. - Eclipse

NEBoom

Quote from: jeders on February 15, 2020, 02:36:25 pm
Quote from: Fubar on February 15, 2020, 02:14:50 amI'd become a NCO tomorrow if someone let me. I'm tired of being in charge all the time because nobody else will step up. I'd love to have a built-in excuse.

Trust me, being an NCO wont change the fact that no one else would step up. And if you would really sit back and let the program fail just because you don't want to be in charge, what does that say about you?

That he finally got burned out?
Lt Col Dan Kirwan, CAP
Nebraska Wing

West MI-CAP-Ret

Quote from: NEBoom on February 15, 2020, 05:25:54 pm
Quote from: jeders on February 15, 2020, 02:36:25 pm
Quote from: Fubar on February 15, 2020, 02:14:50 amI'd become a NCO tomorrow if someone let me. I'm tired of being in charge all the time because nobody else will step up. I'd love to have a built-in excuse.

Trust me, being an NCO wont change the fact that no one else would step up. And if you would really sit back and let the program fail just because you don't want to be in charge, what does that say about you?

That he finally got burned out?

I was just thinking the same thing.  If I was in a squadron where no one steps up, then I'd say there's command failure.  If the person feels they're always tired of being the "guy" who always steps up, then I'd say, stop stepping up!  Having been an AF nco (medically retired due contracting MS), NCOs' job is to be the force behind the organization.  People get burned out because there's a bunch of followers or perhaps see CAP as a social club.  The commander needs to keep track as to who is doing what, and make sure everyone on their team feels appreciated and valued.  Tired of CAP because you're burned out?  Do what you love and let the rest go.  If you don't, you'll stop loving CAP and leave.  All because you tried to do it all because you saw a need.  That parts good.  The bad part is that the burned out person never took the time to communicate their needs. But if they had a good commander they wouldn't have to do that.
MAJ DAVID J. D'ARCY, CAP (Ret) 8 Apr 2018
A former member of:
West Michigan Group MI-703,
Hudsonville Cadet Sqdron MI-135
Lakeshore Cadet Sqdrn MI-119
Van Dyke Cadet Sqdrn, MI-117

West MI-CAP-Ret

Quote from: West MI-CAP-Ret on February 15, 2020, 10:30:10 pm
Quote from: NEBoom on February 15, 2020, 05:25:54 pm
Quote from: jeders on February 15, 2020, 02:36:25 pm
Quote from: Fubar on February 15, 2020, 02:14:50 amI'd become a NCO tomorrow if someone let me. I'm tired of being in charge all the time because nobody else will step up. I'd love to have a built-in excuse.

Trust me, being an NCO wont change the fact that no one else would step up. And if you would really sit back and let the program fail just because you don't want to be in charge, what does that say about you?

That he finally got burned out?

I was just thinking the same thing.  If I was in a squadron where no one steps up, then I'd say there's command failure.  If the person feels they're always tired of being the "guy" who always steps up, then I'd say, stop stepping up!  Having been an AF nco (medically retired due contracting MS), NCOs' job is to be the force behind the organization.  People get burned out because there's a bunch of followers or perhaps see CAP as a social club.  The commander needs to keep track as to who is doing what, and make sure everyone on their team feels appreciated and valued.  Tired of CAP because you're burned out?  Do what you love and let the rest go.  If you don't, you'll stop loving CAP and leave.  All because you tried to do it all because you saw a need.  That parts good.  The bad part is that the burned out person never took the time to communicate their needs. But if they had a good commander they wouldn't have to do that.
MAJ DAVID J. D'ARCY, CAP (Ret) 8 Apr 2018
A former member of:
West Michigan Group MI-703,
Hudsonville Cadet Sqdron MI-135
Lakeshore Cadet Sqdrn MI-119
Van Dyke Cadet Sqdrn, MI-117