October 22, 2020, 12:08:47 pm

TAA Aircraft

Started by etodd, January 21, 2020, 03:11:17 am

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

etodd

 In a recent thread that got locked someone mentioned :

QuoteThe new 172 qualifies as a "technically advanced aircraft" for whatever thats worth.


I will tell you it's beginning to mean a lot. It means Members can now train for IFR, Commercial, CFI, CFII, all using the same C-172 G1000 airplane.  Two of our squadron members have gotten the IFR rating in the last year, one just passed the commercial checkride and is about to take his CFI checkride.  I am about to take Commercial ride in a week or two, and will jump immediately into initial CFI as well.

The FAA providing this new ruling recently allowing TAA in place of complex has opened up a whole new world for CAP training possibilities. Yes Cap has a shortage of instructors, but that is a huge reason I am going to do it. I want to pay it back by helping to train others especially cadets with their PPL.  I will jump into CFII as soon as possible as well. We need more pilots in CAP that are IFR rated.
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

Flying Pig

That whole complex requirement was a total waste of money.

TheSkyHornet

Is the change regarding TAA now that Commercial requires training in TAA, or that TAA requires additional training under Part 61 before an airman may operate a TAA?

It's me--I got lost in the dialogue.

I understand that CAP requires training in the G1000 before operating the G1000 (as a TAA), but I'm not missing something from the Part 61 side, am I? I've flown G1000s before outside of CAP, but they were never logged in my logbook as anything other than, say, C172 or SR20. So I don't really have "TAA Time" unless I was to go back and match the tails with the aircraft equipment.

etodd

Quote from: TheSkyHornet on January 21, 2020, 03:21:36 pm
Is the change regarding TAA now that Commercial requires training in TAA, or that TAA requires additional training under Part 61 before an airman may operate a TAA?

It's me--I got lost in the dialogue.

I understand that CAP requires training in the G1000 before operating the G1000 (as a TAA), but I'm not missing something from the Part 61 side, am I? I've flown G1000s before outside of CAP, but they were never logged in my logbook as anything other than, say, C172 or SR20. So I don't really have "TAA Time" unless I was to go back and match the tails with the aircraft equipment.



It was not so much a change, as it was giving you an option. You can still get the commercial with 10 hours of complex time if you have one available, or now you can substitute 10 hours of instruction in a TAA like a G1000.

If you have gotten your IFR rating in a CAP G1000, those hours can count toward the 10 hours for commercial.  😀
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

TheSkyHornet

Gotcha.

Appreciate the clarification.

I was under the impression that the Complex was going away. I don't really plan to get my Commercial any time in the near future. The older I get, the more of a recreational pilot I become.

etodd

Quote from: TheSkyHornet on January 21, 2020, 04:26:18 pm

The older I get, the more of a recreational pilot I become.


Understand that!   

Me? I'll get my Commercial in the next couple weeks before I turn 64 next month.  LOL
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

audiododd

Quote from: etodd on January 21, 2020, 04:35:43 pm
Quote from: TheSkyHornet on January 21, 2020, 04:26:18 pm

The older I get, the more of a recreational pilot I become.


Understand that!   

Me? I'll get my Commercial in the next couple weeks before I turn 64 next month.  LOL


FYI, the Power-Off 180 & Accuracy Landing is now considered an emergency procedure and you only get one shot at it -- ask me (and my checkbook) how I know :-(.

The FAA released guidance because of differing opinions of instructors, DPEs, and FSDOs.  They haven't yet moved it to the Emergency Operations section of the ACS, but I'll bet they do soon.  My DPE told me that they got notified by the local FSDO a week before my checkride.
Dodd Martin, MSgt, CAP
MSgt, USAF (Ret.)
Squadron NCO
Safety/Comm/Admin/Personnel
TMP - MS - MRO

etodd

Quote from: audiododd on January 23, 2020, 02:22:39 am

FYI, the Power-Off 180 & Accuracy Landing is now considered an emergency procedure and you only get one shot at it -- ask me (and my checkbook) how I know :-(


Thats the one I find easy. Its the lazy-eights that give me trouble, and yet others say its easy. Its funny how each pilot has a different thing they struggle with. Everyone is different.

(But now I've just jinxed it and will land 100 feet short.  LOL)
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

audiododd

Quote from: etodd on January 23, 2020, 04:07:28 amThats the one I find easy. Its the lazy-eights that give me trouble, and yet others say its easy. Its funny how each pilot has a different thing they struggle with. Everyone is different.

(But now I've just jinxed it and will land 100 feet short.  LOL)
Different strokes.  :-) My commercial instructor said she HATED steep spirals and always found them difficult to do properly.  I thought it was one of the easiest maneuvers (except when we had 24kt winds and I almost had to go 60 degrees to keep over my point on the downwind side).  Eights on Pylons were the bane of my flying existence for a long time.
Dodd Martin, MSgt, CAP
MSgt, USAF (Ret.)
Squadron NCO
Safety/Comm/Admin/Personnel
TMP - MS - MRO