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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Aviation & Flying Activities  |  Topic: Air Force Flying Class I Medical satisfactory for CAP?
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Author Topic: Air Force Flying Class I Medical satisfactory for CAP?  (Read 580 times)
all around pilot
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« on: January 13, 2020, 11:38:54 PM »

Air Force pilots with a current Flying Class I medical(Air Force medical required to be an Air Force pilot) are able to use that to satisfy FAR 61.23(b)(9), which says:

Quote
A person is not required to hold a medical certificate when a military pilot of the U.S. Armed Forces can show evidence of an up-to-date medical examination authorizing pilot flight status issued by the U.S. Armed Forces and the flight does not require higher than a third-class medical certificate; and the flight conducted is a domestic flight operation within U.S. airspace.

However, the CAPR 70-1 makes no mention of this. It just says that a FAA class III medical is required. Has anyone ran into this where an active Air Force pilot uses his Flying Class I medical to satisfy a Class III FAA medical requirement to fly for CAP?
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rltw2017
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Unit: KY-223

« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2020, 02:33:36 AM »

Current military flight physicals more than satisfy the requirement, even though CAPR 70-1 (foolishly) doesn't say that it does. FAA physical requirements are the point of reference for in depth issues, not CAPR 70-1, which means that 70-1 defers to the FAA to decide whether someone has satisfactorily met medical requirements for aviation positions.
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TSgt, CAP
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Former 3/75 Ranger Battalion
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PHall
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2020, 04:03:11 AM »

Check to see if your Base Flight Surgeon is an FAA Medical Examiner. If they are then have them submit your Flight Physical to the FAA.
I know that most of our Flight Docs we had in the Air Force Reserve were. Otherwise you get to pay to get your Class III.
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SarDragon
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2020, 04:23:32 AM »

I did the same thing when I was in the Navy, but that was many years ago.

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Dave Bowles
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NovemberWhiskey
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2020, 08:00:47 AM »

A “Military Flight Physical Exam” is one of the options that will satisfy the medical requirement in Ops Quals.
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rltw2017
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Unit: KY-223

« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2020, 01:13:08 PM »

A “Military Flight Physical Exam” is one of the options that will satisfy the medical requirement in Ops Quals.

This is what I was getting at. Apologies if I was unclear.
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TSgt, CAP
SSG, INARNG
Former 3/75 Ranger Battalion
Why won't my back stop hurting.
Flying Pig
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« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2020, 03:21:43 PM »

Even if you're a military pilot, if you fly civilian Part 91, which CAP is, you need an FAA Flight Physical.    So although it may satisfy some CAP check box, you cant fly without the $120 doctor visit.  You are still going to pay for the visit, unless you find a military doctor also happens to be an FAA designee and opts to not charge you. 
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NovemberWhiskey
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« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2020, 10:50:42 PM »

I'd be interested to hear the basis of that assertion. Part 61 says that US armed forces pilots with current military medical do not need to hold a medical certificate if exercising privileges that require only a third-class medical in US airspace. This is surely 99.9% of CAP flying?

Quote
FAR Part 61.23 (b) Operations not requiring a medical certificate. A person is not required to hold a medical certificate -
...
(9) When a military pilot of the U.S. Armed Forces can show evidence of an up-to-date medical examination authorizing pilot flight status issued by the U.S. Armed Forces and -
(i) The flight does not require higher than a third-class medical certificate; and
(ii) The flight conducted is a domestic flight operation within U.S. airspace.
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Eclipse
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« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2020, 10:59:28 PM »

CAP  members are not flying as "military pilots".
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NovemberWhiskey
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« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2020, 11:03:32 PM »

No; but military pilots with current military medicals do not need civilian medicals to operate as private pilots, in US airspace, for Part 91 operations, including Civil Air Patrol.

If you disagree, please at least cite why.
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all around pilot
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« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2020, 12:08:39 AM »

Even if you're a military pilot, if you fly civilian Part 91, which CAP is, you need an FAA Flight Physical.    So although it may satisfy some CAP check box, you cant fly without the $120 doctor visit.  You are still going to pay for the visit, unless you find a military doctor also happens to be an FAA designee and opts to not charge you.

CAP  members are not flying as "military pilots".

Read the reg I posted in my original post.
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all around pilot
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« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2020, 12:09:55 AM »

A “Military Flight Physical Exam” is one of the options that will satisfy the medical requirement in Ops Quals.

Thanks for the post man! That's what I wanted to know.
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farsightusf2017
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« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2020, 12:21:34 AM »

The FAR does specify that only the Flight physicals that Pilots get count. The physicals for Navigators, Air Battle Managers, Air Crew, and such do not meet the criteria
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time With Silver Clasp
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« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2020, 12:48:32 AM »

Even if you're a military pilot, if you fly civilian Part 91, which CAP is, you need an FAA Flight Physical.    So although it may satisfy some CAP check box, you cant fly without the $120 doctor visit.  You are still going to pay for the visit, unless you find a military doctor also happens to be an FAA designee and opts to not charge you.

CAP  members are not flying as "military pilots".

Read the reg I posted in my original post.

Exactly - 70-1 makes no mention of this and CAP is, of course, free to raise the bar.
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NovemberWhiskey
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Unit: NER-NY-301

« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2020, 01:29:06 AM »

The regulation says (CAPR 70-1 section 4) "All CAP pilots must hold a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) pilot certificate (private pilot or higher, except for student pilots) and a medical certificate (or current driver’s license and medical education course completion certificate if operating under BasicMed) appropriate to the level of privileges to be exercised" (emphasis is mine)

Consider gliders. Do you think those words in that regulation require CAP glider pilots to have a medical certificate? They don't. This is because exercising the privileges of a private pilot in a glider does not require a medical certificate, FAR 61.23(b)(3).

Military pilots with current flight physicals also do not require a medical certificate to exercise the privileges of a private pilot, FAR 61.23(b)(9).

So the regulation does not require them to have one. Any other conclusion seems quite obtuse.
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all around pilot
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Posts: 5

« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2020, 01:53:55 AM »

The FAR does specify that only the Flight physicals that Pilots get count. The physicals for Navigators, Air Battle Managers, Air Crew, and such do not meet the criteria

I will refer you to my original question:

Quote
Has anyone ran into this where an active Air Force pilot uses his Flying Class I medical to satisfy a Class III FAA medical requirement to fly for CAP?
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all around pilot
Recruit

Posts: 5

« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2020, 01:57:44 AM »

Exactly - 70-1 makes no mention of this and CAP is, of course, free to raise the bar.

Well, if "Military Flight Physical Exam" is listed as an option for it Ops Qual as NW says, leads me to believe CAP is ok with it?
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TheSkyHornet
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« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2020, 02:43:54 PM »

Exactly - 70-1 makes no mention of this and CAP is, of course, free to raise the bar.

Well, if "Military Flight Physical Exam" is listed as an option for it Ops Qual as NW says, leads me to believe CAP is ok with it?

Regulations don't always coexist with their implementation. This is literally the basis for Quality/Safety Assurance (i.e., "What does the standard require? Does the implementation of that standard match stated processes and procedures?")

An IT function does not necessarily mean it matches the book.

You could comb through eServices and find all kinds of nonsense. That doesn't mean it's ill-intended, but maybe poorly interfaced.
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NovemberWhiskey
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Unit: NER-NY-301

« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2020, 06:17:59 PM »

NHQ director of Stan/Eval confirms that it is accepted as I said above. Happy to forward the email to anyone who needs it.
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