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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Emergency Services & Operations  |  Topic: CUL go bag contents
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C1128Chief
Recruit

Posts: 7
Unit: PCR-CA-224

« on: September 09, 2019, 08:45:59 PM »

I have been working on putting together my CUL go kit/bag for missions and personal use. Any recommendations on commonly used adapters, paperwork, antenna stuff, anything helpful I guess.

I currently have a personally owned EFJ 5113 with a 1/4 wv length antenna plus of course the good old notebook, and station log form, that I keep in a LAPG gear bag.

Any help would be appreciated!
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Comms Guru.
KN6ART
Group 6 Comms Officer Central California
arajca
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,401

« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2019, 09:55:52 PM »

Extension cord, power strip, pliers, #2 phillips screwdriver, 1/4" flathead screwdriver, N-male to UHF-Female adapter, Coax just to name a few simple items. It all depends how complex you want to get.

I've seen 'recommended' equipment lists for CULs that would require a small truck!
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Ozzy
Seasoned Member

Posts: 445
Unit: GA

« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2019, 11:21:46 PM »

Extension cord, power strip, pliers, #2 phillips screwdriver, 1/4" flathead screwdriver, N-male to UHF-Female adapter, Coax just to name a few simple items. It all depends how complex you want to get.

I've seen 'recommended' equipment lists for CULs that would require a small truck!

Or RV!
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Ozyilmaz, MSgt, CAP
C/Lt. Colonel (Ret.)
NYWG Encampment 07, 08, 09, 10, 17
CTWG Encampment 09, 11, 16
NER Cadet Leadership School 10
GAWG NCOA 18
GAWG Encampment 19
THRAWN
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,988

« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2019, 11:42:34 AM »

Extension cord, power strip, pliers, #2 phillips screwdriver, 1/4" flathead screwdriver, N-male to UHF-Female adapter, Coax just to name a few simple items. It all depends how complex you want to get.

I've seen 'recommended' equipment lists for CULs that would require a small truck!

Or RV!


It's okay, I guess. A bit small....
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Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
AFRCC SMC 10-97
NSS ISC 05-00
USAF SOS 2000
USAF ACSC 2011
US NWC 2016
xyzzy
Member

Posts: 65

« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2019, 12:06:53 PM »

My typical SAREX experience has been that most members want to either fly or be on a ground team, so the communicators find themselves having to perform mission base tasks other that what is listed in the mission radio operator or communications unit leader task books.

A task that is best performed at a mission base is plotting RDF bearings from various ground teams and using triangulation to locate estimated positions of beacons. So bring your maps and your favorite scales and protractors for this kind of work. Also bring whatever you usually use to convert among degrees-minutes-seconds, degrees-minutes, or just degrees, and also UTM. Ideally your squadron has trained on this and use the same methods, so you can lend your tools to another mission base staffer who knows how to use them but doesn't own any.
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time With Silver Clasp
*
Posts: 30,205

« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2019, 12:16:42 PM »

That's GBD's job not CUL.  CUL would not even have that
info unless taking it from messages.
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PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,651

« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2019, 04:37:01 PM »

That's GBD's job not CUL.  CUL would not even have that
info unless taking it from messages.

Unless you're working at a short handed base where everybody, all 4 of them, is doing 2 and 3 jobs...
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C1128Chief
Recruit

Posts: 7
Unit: PCR-CA-224

« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2019, 05:03:51 PM »

While I would absolutely love that class A, its probably a bit out of my price range.

As far as GBD tasks go, my father is working on his GTL and GBD tasks so I pretty much run comms and he does the GBD stuff, of course depending on tasking.
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Comms Guru.
KN6ART
Group 6 Comms Officer Central California
ctrossen
Member

Posts: 87
Unit: GLR-WI-156

« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2019, 05:50:34 PM »

If we were to go to the FEMA COM-L student guide, you'd see this as some recommended basics:

Assembling Your Response Kit
Obtain and assemble information and materials needed for a response kit prior to receiving an assignment, including critical items needed for the assignment and items needed for functioning during the first 72 hours.
The following items are suggested as basic information and materials kept in a go bag:
Pads of paper, pencils, pens and tape
Food, beverages, and medications to be self-sustaining for 72 hours or more
Portable radio(s) as appropriate for the region, Hand-held GPS
Radio programming equipment (cloning cable or computer), adapters, and suitable tools, Gang chargers
First-aid kit
24-hour clock
Multi-purpose knife
Access cards or keys to radio facilities and sites within the region
State Communications Interoperability Plan (SCIP)
▪     This document is strategic, not tactical
▪     It is worth reading, however, so that the Communications Unit Leader has a good understanding of his/her surroundings and the systems in place
▪     It is a Statewide strategic plan that aligns State, local, and tribal emergency responders to a single vision of future communications interoperability and provides Communications Unit Leaders with the statewide vision for interoperability
Tactical Interoperable Communications Plans (TICP):
▪    Communication assets and Standard Operating Procedures for their activation and use on a regional basis
▪    TICPs are common to Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) areas, but may also exist locally

Also be sure to get yourself one (or preferably more) -PRINTED- NIFOGs (National Interoperability Field Operations Guide). That's an invaluable resource when you're trying to set up comms with other agencies and no one's a comm person. You ought to be able to get printed copies from your state EM Agency (you can also order them  - they're free - but the last time I put in an order, it took so long for the delivery that I'd forgotten I'd even made the order), but you can download it here: https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/National%20Interoperability%20Field%20Operations%20Guide%20v1%206%201.pdf

And if you want to go overboard, here's some recommendations for COM-T go-bags and a COM-T support package (see attachments).

[fixed outlining]


* 1_ COMT Recommended Tools and Supplies Go-Kit Job Aid_May 23.pdf (35.45 kB - downloaded 10 times.)
* 2_Suggested COMT Personal Response Kit_May 23 2012.pdf (32.58 kB - downloaded 6 times.)
« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 07:29:23 PM by SarDragon » Report to moderator   Logged
Chris Trossen, Lt Col, CAP
Agency Liaison
Wisconsin Wing
ctrossen
Member

Posts: 87
Unit: GLR-WI-156

« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2019, 05:56:18 PM »

Extension cord, power strip, pliers, #2 phillips screwdriver, 1/4" flathead screwdriver, N-male to UHF-Female adapter, Coax just to name a few simple items. It all depends how complex you want to get.

I've seen 'recommended' equipment lists for CULs that would require a small truck!

Or RV!


It's okay, I guess. A bit small....

Perhaps...

BUT, the important feature is: it is the MOST COMFORTABLE mobile command post/MEOC in the state.

How do I know? That picture was taken at one of our annual SIMCOM (Statewide Interoperable Mobile COMmunications) Exercise, where we'll get 20-40 different platforms from around the state and even the region, from local, county, state and federal agencies. And which platform to people come to in order to sit down, relax and spend a few minutes to cool off? Ain't no one else got couches in their platforms.
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Chris Trossen, Lt Col, CAP
Agency Liaison
Wisconsin Wing
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time With Silver Clasp
*
Posts: 30,205

« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2019, 06:00:00 PM »

BUT, the important feature is: it is the MOST COMFORTABLE mobile command post/MEOC in the state.

Maybe so, but don't knock on the door after 5 (though I think that was actually the unit that burned down).
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ctrossen
Member

Posts: 87
Unit: GLR-WI-156

« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2019, 07:53:04 PM »

No, if you're referencing tales of yore from Katrina, that's the beast which made the trip.

To which I'll also point out - when the driver/team leader is a 70+yo, crew rest issues occasionally come at inopportune times for others, especially after making a cross-country trek.

But then again, that's a LIMFAC we all have to deal with in our respective wings from time to time, no?


And for a brief history on this particular platform... as Bob alluded to, the predecessor to this vehicle suffered an engine fire following a parade it drove in. So yes, as the tale is told, Orca 1 burned down in a July 4 parade. But from its ashes - and a not-insignificantly sized HLS grant - rose the mighty Orca 2. Which, unlike its RV-based predecessor, wasn't a horrible mish-mash of cable porn and mis-matched scrounged parts the likes of which could be a set in a Terry Gilliam movie.
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Chris Trossen, Lt Col, CAP
Agency Liaison
Wisconsin Wing
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