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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Safety  |  Topic: NHQ/Safety and DO video repost
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Live2Learn
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 704

« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2018, 06:16:29 PM »


On crew aircraft this is why we have CRM (Cockpit Resource Management) classes. If you see something, say something...
On both of these accidents no one in the aircraft attempted to intervene. This was backed up by the CVR on the C-17.

CRM only works consistently when the culture nurtured at the top supports it.  The accident reports for the three mishaps I mentioned had several common features.  Among them were command support for the antics of the rogue PIC.   

Prior to the 1994 B52 crash Lieutenant Colonel McGeehan had raised the alarm about Holland's multiple vilations of SOP.  After multiple aircrew in his squadron expressed serious concerns about Holland over a period spanning YEARS McGeehan had little choice but take the right seat of the aircraft.  "CRM" evidently had no role in that disasterous flight.  Holland flew as Holland chose to once the aircraft was in the air.  The time to intervene had long since past, quashed by higher level commanders.  Was McGeehan supposed to pull a John Wayne and punch Holland in the face as the aircraft rolled past 60 degees into a stall at 250 AGL?  Clearly, "see something, say something!" is important.  It works if culture AND commanders give it uncondtional support.  I'm very happy that our National Commander's emphasis on accountability and adhering to the regs.  I hope we see local commanders provide the necessary follow through.  On that, time will tell.
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 29,355

« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2018, 06:37:50 PM »

CRM only works consistently when the culture nurtured at the top supports it.  The accident reports for the three mishaps I mentioned had several common features.  Among them were command support for the antics of the rogue PIC.   

The same can generally be said for issues within any hierarchical organizaiton of scale.

When "safety" becomes an earworm, and leaders put onorous requirements in place that they themselves
publicly ignore, or "adjust", for the sake of expedience, cost-savings, or avoidance of uncomfortable conversations,
it places the entirety of the culture at risk, while also allowing it to be open to personal interpretation and logical fallacies.

If you discipline a puppy for peeing on the rug, it won't be surprised when it makes a mistake and
gets into trouble, and the other puppies in the litter might notice and avoid a bad idea.

If you ignore the stinky carpet, or clean up the mess without any consequences, then suddenly
make an issue of it to a 5-year old fully-grown dog, all you'll be left with is a mess and an aggressively resentful
animal who is confused what he did wrong, not to mention the example that's been set for the rest of the litter.

In CAP, there are generally few to any consequences for bad behavior until they are so far over the line as
to call for termination, when if a correction was made when someone first saw a leg starting to be lifted,
the whole mess could have been avoided.

People make mistakes, that's a given, and the kind of mature, reasonable adults that CAP wants and needs in its ranks
will accept reasonable and mature ramifications and discipline when they are found to be lacking.

"Reasonable and mature" is many times lost in the yelling and pontificating about the honest mistakes, and
well intentioned, misguided "good ideas" that make up the majority of CAP incidents and disciplinary issues.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 06:42:52 PM by Eclipse » Logged


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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Safety  |  Topic: NHQ/Safety and DO video repost
 


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