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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Emergency Services & Operations  |  Topic: CAPP 70-3 Emergency Services Officer Specialty Track Study Guide - March 2018
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Author Topic: CAPP 70-3 Emergency Services Officer Specialty Track Study Guide - March 2018  (Read 3170 times)
Eclipse
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Posts: 29,353

« on: March 05, 2018, 11:22:35 PM »

https://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/static/media/cms/CAPP_703_5_Mar_18_693D84E455FEE.pdf

Looks to my eyes like the majority of the changes are reasonable and in line with current expectations
of the position.

Reduces the service time for Master to 18 months, which is a little more then 1/2 what it was before
(and means I can make Master now, which is clearly the most important point).

Removes reference to ECI test and adds updated ESO tests in the LMS.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2018, 12:06:57 AM by Eclipse » Logged


Holding Pattern
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,293
Unit: Worry

« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2018, 11:54:05 PM »

Well, this explains where the arctic blast came from...
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darkmatter
Forum Regular

Posts: 158

« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2018, 12:02:41 PM »

There's no grandfather clause I don't like that
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,517
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2018, 08:12:16 PM »

There's no grandfather clause I don't like that

Like this:
Quote
Senior members/cadets that have accomplished a rating prior to the release date of this pamphlet will retain their rating. All tasks required for a rating not yet achieved must be completed for the next rating in the specialty track.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
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Recruit

Posts: 11

« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2018, 04:55:10 AM »

In Attachment 3, a "Disaster Relief Team Member" is a position that is under development.
Does anybody in the know, know what that might look like?
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darkmatter
Forum Regular

Posts: 158

« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2018, 11:27:03 AM »

There's no grandfather clause I don't like that

Like this:
Quote
Senior members/cadets that have accomplished a rating prior to the release date of this pamphlet will retain their rating. All tasks required for a rating not yet achieved must be completed for the next rating in the specialty track.

Does not help me one bit because I'm still working on tech rating and there's again no grandfather clause
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cnitas
Seasoned Member

Posts: 423

« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2018, 02:11:14 PM »

What exactly do you need to be grandfathered? 

They have dropped some of the old dated requirements, and other than adding the e-services/WMIRS items and IS courses (which as ES officer you should know well), there is not a whole lot of difference between the new and old items. 

You still have to have a mission specialty rating, and participate in several exercises and/or missions.  You still need to do a training plan, and be familiar with the relevant regulations, and be able to explain and describe the job.

I do not see a problem, and it seems straight forward and appropriate to me.  If you were 1/2 way through the old Tech rating, and active in ES, you should be well on your way in the revised system.  A meeting with your OJT Mentor should be able to get most things sorted.
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Mark A. Piersall, Lt Col, CAP
Frederick Composite Squadron
MER-MD-003
Sriracha
Recruit

Posts: 35
Unit: NER-NJ-037

« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2018, 04:59:25 PM »

In Attachment 3, a "Disaster Relief Team Member" is a position that is under development.
Does anybody in the know, know what that might look like?

It would most likely be similar to GTM right now, but most likely have higher qualifications for medical capabilities and more FEMA classes required. In function, they would probably be a more specialized GTM, so SAR and Disaster Relief could be separated. At least, that's my guess.
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Geber
Member

Posts: 68

« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2018, 06:08:05 PM »

In Attachment 3, a "Disaster Relief Team Member" is a position that is under development.
Does anybody in the know, know what that might look like?

I have no insight into what CAP is planning. I am a member of an American Red Cross disaster action team. Their training requirements are undergoing revision. In the latest draft, entry level qualification, just above trainee, involves these topics:

  • Training about resources for families to help their recovery
  • Casework
  • Even-handed treatment of various kinds of families
  • Shelter fundamentals
  • Psycological first aid
  • Introduction to Red Cross alerting system

If I were putting together requirements for CAP, I would include knowledge of the CAP alerting system, General Emergency Services, shelter fundamentals, and physical fitness (perhaps passing, rather than attempting, the current cadet fitness requirement, or for senior members, the Air Force fitness requirement for their age and gender).
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CAP9907
Global Moderator

Posts: 94

« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2018, 07:03:54 PM »

Would you propose those same physical standards for anything else, like UDF or GTL? Why for this, since no other op qual requires this standard?


In Attachment 3, a "Disaster Relief Team Member" is a position that is under development.
Does anybody in the know, know what that might look like?

I have no insight into what CAP is planning. I am a member of an American Red Cross disaster action team. Their training requirements are undergoing revision. In the latest draft, entry level qualification, just above trainee, involves these topics:

  • Training about resources for families to help their recovery
  • Casework
  • Even-handed treatment of various kinds of families
  • Shelter fundamentals
  • Psycological first aid
  • Introduction to Red Cross alerting system

If I were putting together requirements for CAP, I would include knowledge of the CAP alerting system, General Emergency Services, shelter fundamentals, and physical fitness (perhaps passing, rather than attempting, the current cadet fitness requirement, or for senior members, the Air Force fitness requirement for their age and gender).
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Geber
Member

Posts: 68

« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2018, 08:00:35 PM »

Would you propose those same physical standards for anything else, like UDF or GTL? Why for this, since no other op qual requires this standard?

As you may know, there is a list of national MOUs at https://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/members/cap-national-hq/general-counsel/national-mous-1665/. The two organizations that seem most disaster-related are the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army. The Salvation Army MOU is mostly about transporting people and things by air. The Red Cross MOU does mention ground activities.

Some kinds of aid, such as sheltering and feeding, require the CAP member to receive training from the Red Cross. If this training were done extensively and well in advance, as with a specialty qualification, the member would be well on the way to being qualified as a Red Cross Disaster Action Team (DAT) member, and might end up joining Red Cross and responding with them rather than CAP.

Some kinds of assistance by CAP for which Red Cross members don't receive any special training, and for which some of them may not be well prepared, are (from the MOU) "manual labor (e.g. filling sand bags for flood control), radio communications, and ground teams (typically used in search and rescue (SAR) missions)". We already have specialties for communications and SAR. What neither organization has at present is a qualification that includes evaluating the member's ability to perform manual labor, beyond the walking required for a ground team.
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Fubar
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Posts: 739

« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2018, 08:25:39 PM »

Some kinds of aid, such as sheltering and feeding, require the CAP member to receive training from the Red Cross. If this training were done extensively and well in advance, as with a specialty qualification, the member would be well on the way to being qualified as a Red Cross Disaster Action Team (DAT) member, and might end up joining Red Cross and responding with them rather than CAP.

I don't think there's any "might" about it as unless you're air crew, there likely won't be an opportunity to respond other than with the ARC.
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Holding Pattern
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,293
Unit: Worry

« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2018, 10:57:50 PM »

Some kinds of aid, such as sheltering and feeding, require the CAP member to receive training from the Red Cross. If this training were done extensively and well in advance, as with a specialty qualification, the member would be well on the way to being qualified as a Red Cross Disaster Action Team (DAT) member, and might end up joining Red Cross and responding with them rather than CAP.

I don't think there's any "might" about it as unless you're air crew, there likely won't be an opportunity to respond other than with the ARC.

I have a sneaking suspicion that Katrina was and will be the last time we see a ground team effort on any major scale. We never adapted, we got left behind. I look forward to being proven wrong.
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etodd
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,324

« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2018, 04:44:32 AM »


I have a sneaking suspicion that Katrina was and will be the last time we see a ground team effort on any major scale. We never adapted, we got left behind. I look forward to being proven wrong.

But with Katrina we excelled in the Airborne Photography arena. Noticed by many, and we have been tasked more and more ever since. FEMA and others love what we do.
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PHall
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Posts: 6,358

« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2018, 02:53:23 PM »


I have a sneaking suspicion that Katrina was and will be the last time we see a ground team effort on any major scale. We never adapted, we got left behind. I look forward to being proven wrong.

But with Katrina we excelled in the Airborne Photography arena. Noticed by many, and we have been tasked more and more ever since. FEMA and others love what we do.

Until they get their own drones and they don't need us anymore...
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CAPLTC
Forum Regular

Posts: 167
Unit: MER

« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2018, 08:47:26 PM »

But with Katrina we excelled in the Airborne Photography arena. Noticed by many, and we have been tasked more and more ever since. FEMA and others love what we do.

That is absolutely true.
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"Find the enemy that wants to end this experiment (in American democracy) and kill every one of them until they’re so sick of the killing that they leave us and our freedoms intact." -- SECDEF Mattis
Ed Bos
Seasoned Member

Posts: 438
Unit: PCR-OR-001

« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2018, 12:46:02 PM »

In Attachment 3, a "Disaster Relief Team Member" is a position that is under development.
Does anybody in the know, know what that might look like?

I started workshopping that with Mr. Desmarais and left it in when the draft for this pamphlet was written.

As conceived, it would be an add-on for GTM... You'd have to have a Ground Team Member qualification first, and then some additional training for disaster relief work. Some ideas included:
  • Mission Photography (some significant differences from Airborne work)
  • IS-559: Local Damage Assessment or Red Cross Assessment Basics
  • IS-632.a: Introduction to Debris Operations
  • Task P-2026: What to Look for and Record during Damage Assessment Missions
  • A brief familiarization on USAR (new CAP Task)
  • A brief familiarization on building markings during building assements & disaster relief operations (new CAP Task)

And for Team Leaders:
  • IS-806: Introduction to ESF #6 Mass Care
  • IS-288: The Role of Volunteer Agencies in Emergency Management
  • Task C-0004: Conduct Ground Team Safety Briefing
  • Task C-0008: Monitor Crew Rest, Fatigue, and Stress
  • Red Cross Disaster Assessment Leadership Workshop
  • Red Cross Shelter Management Course
  • FEMA Distribution Point Training

The concept was that Search and Rescue Ground Teams already have training in navigating, communicating, and operating in the field.

....physical fitness...

I hadn't considered this, but I think it's better to leave the IC, OSC, and team leader in charge of determining who's fit to head out the door. I believe a little discretion left in the hands of our leaders in the field is good.

Speaking of which, none of the concept is meant to prevent an IC from asking any 101-Card-Carrying member from joining a sandbag-filling operation, even if they don't have a special "disaster relief" qualification. It's just meant to build a standard training set for our people. This way, a Planning Section can know what these personnel already know, without having to have a lot of extra discussion after we're already responding to an event.

Also, the project is stalled, in case anyone wants to pick it up and run with it.

Cheers!
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EDWARD A. BOS, Lt Col, CAP
Email: e.bos(at)orwg.cap.gov
PCR-OR-001
beachdoc
Recruit

Posts: 19
Unit: MER-NC-022

« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2018, 02:31:17 PM »

Regarding a post by Mordeci:

 "I have a sneaking suspicion that Katrina was and will be the last time we see a ground team effort on any major scale. We never adapted, we got left behind. I look forward to being proven wrong."

Sorry, don't know how to do embedded quotes.

I was a member of the NC-1 DMAT and NMRT-E for 14 years.  I joined because I wanted to perform that disaster function.  Our team had a number of CAP members who joined for that reason as well.  FEMA teams are highly skilled professionals who do what they do on the teams in daily life, for the most part.  They are very well organized, were capable of self-sufficient deployments, other than fuel for the most part.  Unfortunately, we had poor medical logistic support, which is why I left the organization.

IMO rather than try to hammer a "square" CAP into a "round" disaster response hole, i.e. post-disaster search and rescue (currently done by fire and Urban Search and Rescue) teams that are specifically trained and routinely drill and as importantly equipped and have a logistic trail we need to do what we "do".

I submit if someone wants to be involved in post-hurricane USAR or medical response, then join a team and be trained to do so.
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Major Jeffery S Anderson, M.D., CAP
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 29,353

« Reply #18 on: March 17, 2018, 03:35:17 PM »

Speaking of which, none of the concept is meant to prevent an IC from asking any 101-Card-Carrying member from joining a sandbag-filling operation, even if they don't have a special "disaster relief" qualification.

Then it was / is doomed before it started.  Knowing "there's no time for backup, shoulder roll in..." is what keeps a lot
of edge players from getting appropriate training, and infuriates those who spend the time and money to be properly prepared.

ES Dayplayers® cause far more trouble then they are worth, become team liabilities, are detrimental to
good order and discipline, and ultimately defeat the purpose intended. (Anecdotal "success" and media mentions don't refute this.)

CAP needs to draft and adopt DR doctrine which is based on mission (defined), customers (identified), agencies supported (identified),
and real-world capabilities (defined, identified, and mandated with ramifications), and move away from flipping through training
menus of other agencies which may or may not be appropriate, with the hope "somebody will call us".

And again, if anyone thinks the ARC, Salvation Army, or similar ES/DR "machines" want or need CAP's help, you can disavow that
notion once and finally.   They don't need or want help from anyone with a uniform and separate command structure, they want
bodies in their golf shirts.  They are happy to gain access to CAP rosters for recruiting and donations, but don't need CAP's help.
They are always polite, professional, and respectful, but ultimately the truth comes out. BTDT.

And like everything else that needs to be fixed, if you start today, you're looking at 5+ years before changes are mandated, adopted,
and there is any internal proficiency.

"ES Dayplayers®" is a registered trademark of eClipseco Mining and Heavy Machinery Consortium.  All Rights Reserved.
Let eClipseco service all of your rhetoric and propaganda needs!
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 29,353

« Reply #19 on: March 17, 2018, 03:39:41 PM »

I have a sneaking suspicion that Katrina was and will be the last time we see a ground team effort on any major scale. We never adapted, we got left behind. I look forward to being proven wrong.

I've been involved in other, similar, ground responses since then, but they were Regional in scope and personnel.
Which should be the widest out-call for help in most incidents.

The fact of the matter is that CAP, as an organization, has no grasp or capability in regards to the logistics
of deploying people across the country, especially volunteers.  It either waits far too long to deploy,
or deploys people into a DA that has austere resources at best, and where there may be no adequate food,
shelter, and hygiene resources, assuming "someone" will figure it out when they get there.

Many times CAP members wind up sleeping in tents, hangar floors, school rooms, or even their
cars, which paid professionals are in local hotels, on per diem, while CAP people are digging
into their last MRE, calculating how much vacation time they are burning sitting in flooded
city waiting for taskings that never come, or take hours to figure out. (Weeks after the incident).

With that said, it's not supposed to be necessary, CAP ES response is supposed to be local.
Leaving out those who are personally affected by a given incident, any time you start looking for
CAP resources that are more then a few hours drive away, you've identified an area where the wings
and regions have failed to properly man and equip
their own people.

That comes right back to the broken record of people, which is the same recruiting and retention
problem come full circle, and is the real problem in CAP, and has been for the last 20 years.
The organization is simply undermanned by at least 2/3rds to even remotely address the mission
mandates.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2018, 03:45:15 PM by Eclipse » Logged


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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Emergency Services & Operations  |  Topic: CAPP 70-3 Emergency Services Officer Specialty Track Study Guide - March 2018
 


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