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CAPSOC_0pur8ur
Member

Posts: 52

« on: February 26, 2018, 11:25:28 PM »

Hey guys, just looking for you guy's thoughts on the new PT program. The initial reaction at my squadron was that they were really relaxed, but I'm curious to see if this is the general consensus or if y'all think they're on target? Also, what PT activities have been popular at you guys' squadrons? Looking for some new ideas to spice up our PT nights. (plz don't say volleyball lol)
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"To be somebody or to do something. In life there is often a roll call. Thatís when you will have to make a decision. To be or to do? Which way will you go?Ē -Col John Boyd
TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,252

« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2018, 04:39:50 PM »

Hey guys, just looking for you guy's thoughts on the new PT program. The initial reaction at my squadron was that they were really relaxed, but I'm curious to see if this is the general consensus or if y'all think they're on target? Also, what PT activities have been popular at you guys' squadrons? Looking for some new ideas to spice up our PT nights. (plz don't say volleyball lol)

I think you're in the majority of opinions on this.

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Cadetter
Seasoned Member

Posts: 224

« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2018, 04:49:49 PM »

We did our first run of the new PT program this month. Most of our cadets scored NI for PACER. For mile, almost everyone made HFZ (except for those who are very far from passing/scoring HFZ in mile regardless of the PT program used). I think that all cadets scored HFZ for curl-ups and sit-and-reach. More scored HFZ for push-ups than passed the old PT.

Capture the Flag (sometimes overused), flag football, relay races, ultimate frisbee, team circuits, soccer, volleyball, and lacrosse are fun, although obviously some are easier to orchestrate than others.
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Wright Brothers Award, 2013
Billy Mitchell Award, 2016
Earhart Award, 2018

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jeders
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,077

« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2018, 06:48:48 PM »

The standards are definitely geared less at churning out track stars and more at developing healthy exercise habits than the old system. That said, the PACER seems to be quite a bit more difficult for most cadets to pass than the old shuttle run.

As for what to do when you're not doing the PFT, we've done capture the flag, volleyball (I know, I know), ultimate frisbee, compass courses, 3-4 mile ruck marches, hide and seek, martial arts, nutrition classes, and many others that I'm already forgetting.
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If you are confident in you abilities and experience, whether someone else is impressed is irrelevant. - Eclipse
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,731

« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2018, 08:38:14 PM »

It's also clearly a retention play, which, despite the rhetoric about watering down the program, some which may have come from
me, probably isn't a bad idea in the grande scheme,
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CAPSOC_0pur8ur
Member

Posts: 52

« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2018, 12:31:37 PM »

Yeah. Most of the cadets in our squadron run cross country and are on the wrestling team, so even the old PT standards were almost laughable. The new ones are basically a warmup. But I understand their reasoning, and if it will get new cadets in the door, or keep old ones in, Iím all for it. After all, just because CAPís standard is lower doesnít mean our personal standards must be.
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"To be somebody or to do something. In life there is often a roll call. Thatís when you will have to make a decision. To be or to do? Which way will you go?Ē -Col John Boyd
LATORRECA
Seasoned Member

Posts: 226

« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2018, 07:48:15 PM »

Are we still doing the 3 second push ups to point of failure?
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arajca
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,268

« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2018, 07:58:53 PM »

We do them until the recording stops. Yes, my unit bought the official cd for the fitness program. The recording stops at 3 or 4 minutes, forget which off hand.
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LATORRECA
Seasoned Member

Posts: 226

« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2018, 08:08:15 PM »

For the pacer i download the recording to my phone. Is the crunches the same way with the arms cross on the chest or they are now with the hands down touching the strip band on the floor.

Carlos A
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CAPSOC_0pur8ur
Member

Posts: 52

« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2018, 08:23:04 PM »

For the pacer i download the recording to my phone. Is the crunches the same way with the arms cross on the chest or they are now with the hands down touching the strip band on the floor.

Carlos A

Just check the regs... it's all in there
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"To be somebody or to do something. In life there is often a roll call. Thatís when you will have to make a decision. To be or to do? Which way will you go?Ē -Col John Boyd
LATORRECA
Seasoned Member

Posts: 226

« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2018, 08:32:21 PM »

Check....rog! wilco
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Vegas1972
Member

Posts: 52
Unit: PCR-NV

« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2018, 08:33:53 PM »

For the pacer i download the recording to my phone. Is the crunches the same way with the arms cross on the chest or they are now with the hands down touching the strip band on the floor.

Carlos A

Just check the regs... it's all in there

Itís with the hands down over the strip.
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"Life is tough, but it's tougher if you're stupid.", Sgt. John M. Stryker.
LATORRECA
Seasoned Member

Posts: 226

« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2018, 08:56:40 PM »

For the pacer i download the recording to my phone. Is the crunches the same way with the arms cross on the chest or they are now with the hands down touching the strip band on the floor.

Carlos A

Just check the regs... it's all in there

Itís with the hands down over the strip.

Thank you gentlemen, I found it. Good for every 6 months and provide once a quarter and all.

Carlos A.
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Noah Pluska
Recruit

Posts: 6
Unit: PCR-WA-051

« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2018, 11:48:47 PM »

People at my squadron seem to be doing about just as they were before the new standards, that being said, in my opinion they are more directed at overall healthy physical activity as opposed to meeting specific numbers. I can see how this is a good, and a bad thing, but regardless: the standards are here to stay.
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-C/SMSgt Noah Pluska
PCR-WA-051
BraveRifles19D
Recruit

Posts: 28

« Reply #14 on: March 07, 2018, 09:50:04 PM »

Had 2 of 11 pass the pacer the first time out. 2 just quit with 1 lap left.
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The_CAP_Life_Chose_Me
Recruit

Posts: 39

« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2018, 11:13:48 PM »

At my squadron, on PT nights we often do what we like to call "HARDCORE PT!" which is where somebody (in my case it's our Cadet Medical Officer) plans a very hard PT course-race where we do stuff such as pulling cinderblocks, fireman carrying, burpees, etc, etc. Pretty much anything that you would imagine that would be too hard we do it. 

Also for games, I would suggest Nerf gun wars, water balloon fights, Capture the Flag, Squirrels, Hardcore Sharks and Minnows, freeze tag, relay races, and Frisbee Football.

(Since this is a game two cadets made in our squadron I am just going to give you the rules for it)
Hardcore Sharks and Minnows:
Just like normal sharks and minnows, except with a few new rules. If you get tagged by a shark, you do 5 push-ups. Once you do that, you sit down on the spot that you got tagged in and be seaweed. If you get tagged by seaweed, then the seaweed decides how many push-ups you do, with a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 15. If you would like to do more push-ups, by all means, go for it.

C/SrA Cassie
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C/SSgt Cassie
PA Guy
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 730

« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2018, 03:28:47 AM »



  Cadet Medical Officer?  ::) ::)
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The_CAP_Life_Chose_Me
Recruit

Posts: 39

« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2018, 09:04:19 AM »



  Cadet Medical Officer?  ::) ::)

 Haha, yeah. I feel like he is just waiting for us to get hurt so he can finally have something to do.  ;) Nah, he's mainly just more dedicated than everyone on doing PT so he was picked to be in charge of it, also esp since he was the one I believe that asked and got our squadron to do it.  ;D
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C/SSgt Cassie
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,731

« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2018, 01:11:49 PM »

At my squadron, on PT nights we often do what we like to call "HARDCORE PT!" which is where somebody (in my case it's our Cadet Medical Officer) plans a very hard PT course-race where we do stuff such as pulling cinderblocks, fireman carrying, burpees, etc, etc. Pretty much anything that you would imagine that would be too hard we do it. 

Also for games, I would suggest Nerf gun wars, water balloon fights, Capture the Flag, Squirrels, Hardcore Sharks and Minnows, freeze tag, relay races, and Frisbee Football.

(Since this is a game two cadets made in our squadron I am just going to give you the rules for it)
Hardcore Sharks and Minnows:
Just like normal sharks and minnows, except with a few new rules. If you get tagged by a shark, you do 5 push-ups. Once you do that, you sit down on the spot that you got tagged in and be seaweed. If you get tagged by seaweed, then the seaweed decides how many push-ups you do, with a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 15. If you would like to do more push-ups, by all means, go for it.

C/SrA Cassie

Cadet Cassie, you are new to CAP, so there's no foul in your not being aware of the issues in your post, however
with that said, you have essentially provided a treatise on what not to do for CAP cadet PT, whether
that angle being safety, appropriateness for situation, or just common sense.

This would be an excellent thing for you, and your parents to discuss with the Unit Commander directly,
perhaps involving the next echelon to insure it gets the proper attention.

In all seriousness, none of those activities should be continued, including the pushups during
a team challenge - that can morph into hazing quickly, especially with the lack of adult supervision
which would seem apparent from the above.

Further to this, the only individuals who may be appointed as "Medical Officers" are adult members who are
also MDs, there is no role or position which in any way even alludes to a "Cadet Medical Officer", and in fact,
while cadets are encouraged to be included, CAPP 60-50 makes a point to indicate that adult members
are the ones to be in charge of PT activities.

The pamphlet also stresses that PT activities must be "appropriate to training goals" (paraphrased as NHQ had rendered
the PDF in a way that makes it difficult to quote).

None of those "hardcore PT" activities are appropriate for adolescents, especially in a CAP environment.  Consider
for a second the ramifications of dropping a cinder block on a foot wearing athletic shoes, or a cadet being driven
into the ground face-first by another cadet who is both incapable of carrying the weight, not to mention improperly
trained on technique, in regards to the fireman's carry. Made worse by it being a "race".

This is an excellent learning opportunity for both you, other cadets in your unit, and most importantly your leadership.
Logged


The_CAP_Life_Chose_Me
Recruit

Posts: 39

« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2018, 03:21:42 PM »

At my squadron, on PT nights we often do what we like to call "HARDCORE PT!" which is where somebody (in my case it's our Cadet Medical Officer) plans a very hard PT course-race where we do stuff such as pulling cinderblocks, fireman carrying, burpees, etc, etc. Pretty much anything that you would imagine that would be too hard we do it. 

Also for games, I would suggest Nerf gun wars, water balloon fights, Capture the Flag, Squirrels, Hardcore Sharks and Minnows, freeze tag, relay races, and Frisbee Football.

(Since this is a game two cadets made in our squadron I am just going to give you the rules for it)
Hardcore Sharks and Minnows:
Just like normal sharks and minnows, except with a few new rules. If you get tagged by a shark, you do 5 push-ups. Once you do that, you sit down on the spot that you got tagged in and be seaweed. If you get tagged by seaweed, then the seaweed decides how many push-ups you do, with a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 15. If you would like to do more push-ups, by all means, go for it.

C/SrA Cassie

Cadet Cassie, you are new to CAP, so there's no foul in your not being aware of the issues in your post, however
with that said, you have essentially provided a treatise on what not to do for CAP cadet PT, whether
that angle being safety, appropriateness for situation, or just common sense.

This would be an excellent thing for you, and your parents to discuss with the Unit Commander directly,
perhaps involving the next echelon to insure it gets the proper attention.

In all seriousness, none of those activities should be continued, including the pushups during
a team challenge - that can morph into hazing quickly, especially with the lack of adult supervision
which would seem apparent from the above.

Further to this, the only individuals who may be appointed as "Medical Officers" are adult members who are
also MDs, there is no role or position which in any way even alludes to a "Cadet Medical Officer", and in fact,
while cadets are encouraged to be included, CAPP 60-50 makes a point to indicate that adult members
are the ones to be in charge of PT activities.

The pamphlet also stresses that PT activities must be "appropriate to training goals" (paraphrased as NHQ had rendered
the PDF in a way that makes it difficult to quote).

None of those "hardcore PT" activities are appropriate for adolescents, especially in a CAP environment.  Consider
for a second the ramifications of dropping a cinder block on a foot wearing athletic shoes, or a cadet being driven
into the ground face-first by another cadet who is both incapable of carrying the weight, not to mention improperly
trained on technique, in regards to the fireman's carry. Made worse by it being a "race".

This is an excellent learning opportunity for both you, other cadets in your unit, and most importantly your leadership.

Eclipse,

Thank you for this information. If this makes it any better the senior members go over what he propose we should do for Hardcore PT before we actually do it, including the (SM) Saftey/Medical Officer. And before we do any of the exercises we are all demonstrated each week on how to do it even if we all already know how to do it. And for the cinder blocks, we drag it with rope on the ground. Also, for the fireman carry, females fireman carry other females, and males fireman carry other males (and no one is allowed to carry someone that would be too heavy for them). And even though this is a race like an event it is more of team-building exercises and from all the time we have done it nobody has gotten injured or out of hand instead, they've all worked together. And on top of that, we have more than one SM supervising to make sure it doesn't get out of hand, and the Cadet Medical Officer goes above and beyond making sure that nobody gets hurt.

But I will report anything I find unsafe with this information you shared with me. I am actually glad you did share this with me I was unaware of some of the stuff you pointed out.

Thanks,

C/SrA Cassie
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C/SSgt Cassie
abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,555
Unit: Classified

« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2018, 03:30:50 PM »

At my squadron, on PT nights we often do what we like to call "HARDCORE PT!" which is where somebody (in my case it's our Cadet Medical Officer) plans a very hard PT course-race where we do stuff such as pulling cinderblocks, fireman carrying, burpees, etc, etc. Pretty much anything that you would imagine that would be too hard we do it. 

Also for games, I would suggest Nerf gun wars, water balloon fights, Capture the Flag, Squirrels, Hardcore Sharks and Minnows, freeze tag, relay races, and Frisbee Football.

(Since this is a game two cadets made in our squadron I am just going to give you the rules for it)
Hardcore Sharks and Minnows:
Just like normal sharks and minnows, except with a few new rules. If you get tagged by a shark, you do 5 push-ups. Once you do that, you sit down on the spot that you got tagged in and be seaweed. If you get tagged by seaweed, then the seaweed decides how many push-ups you do, with a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 15. If you would like to do more push-ups, by all means, go for it.

C/SrA Cassie

Cadet Cassie, you are new to CAP, so there's no foul in your not being aware of the issues in your post, however
with that said, you have essentially provided a treatise on what not to do for CAP cadet PT, whether
that angle being safety, appropriateness for situation, or just common sense.

This would be an excellent thing for you, and your parents to discuss with the Unit Commander directly,
perhaps involving the next echelon to insure it gets the proper attention.

In all seriousness, none of those activities should be continued, including the pushups during
a team challenge - that can morph into hazing quickly, especially with the lack of adult supervision
which would seem apparent from the above.

Further to this, the only individuals who may be appointed as "Medical Officers" are adult members who are
also MDs, there is no role or position which in any way even alludes to a "Cadet Medical Officer", and in fact,
while cadets are encouraged to be included, CAPP 60-50 makes a point to indicate that adult members
are the ones to be in charge of PT activities.

The pamphlet also stresses that PT activities must be "appropriate to training goals" (paraphrased as NHQ had rendered
the PDF in a way that makes it difficult to quote).

None of those "hardcore PT" activities are appropriate for adolescents, especially in a CAP environment.  Consider
for a second the ramifications of dropping a cinder block on a foot wearing athletic shoes, or a cadet being driven
into the ground face-first by another cadet who is both incapable of carrying the weight, not to mention improperly
trained on technique, in regards to the fireman's carry. Made worse by it being a "race".

This is an excellent learning opportunity for both you, other cadets in your unit, and most importantly your leadership.

Eclipse,

Thank you for this information. If this makes it any better the senior members go over what he propose we should do for Hardcore PT before we actually do it, including the (SM) Saftey/Medical Officer. And before we do any of the exercises we are all demonstrated each week on how to do it even if we all already know how to do it. And for the cinder blocks, we drag it with rope on the ground. Also, for the fireman carry, females fireman carry other females, and males fireman carry other males (and no one is allowed to carry someone that would be too heavy for them). And even though this is a race like an event it is more of team-building exercises and from all the time we have done it nobody has gotten injured or out of hand instead, they've all worked together. And on top of that, we have more than one SM supervising to make sure it doesn't get out of hand, and the Cadet Medical Officer goes above and beyond making sure that nobody gets hurt.

But I will report anything I find unsafe with this information you shared with me. I am actually glad you did share this with me I was unaware of some of the stuff you pointed out.

Thanks,

C/SrA Cassie

*face palm*  You missed the entire point of what was said.....
Logged
jeders
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,077

« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2018, 04:01:54 PM »

Eclipse, have you even read the new physical fitness guide? Most of those activities that the cadet listed are specifically called out as good things to do (ultimate frisbee, freeze tag, CTF). The others, such as the Hardcore PT, all work towards what the PT guide says cadets SHOULD be doing; specifically, they are muscle building and aerobic activities.

While I agree that the PT program should be generally lead and certainly supervised by senior members, I think that the activities that are taking place in this cadets squadron are an example of how to 1.) keep cadets engaged and 2.) develop healthy habits and lifestyle choices.
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If you are confident in you abilities and experience, whether someone else is impressed is irrelevant. - Eclipse
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,731

« Reply #22 on: March 08, 2018, 05:25:14 PM »

Eclipse, have you even read the new physical fitness guide? Most of those activities that the cadet listed are specifically called out as good things to do (ultimate frisbee, freeze tag, CTF). The others, such as the Hardcore PT, all work towards what the PT guide says cadets SHOULD be doing; specifically, they are muscle building and aerobic activities.

Dragging cylinder blocks, fireman carries, and other nonsense like that are dangerous and not appropriate for cadets.
There is no place within the curriculum that these things are "recommended", and references to "hardcore PT" are clearly
intensity mismatch for the CAP Active Fitness Program.

When you look at the recommended activities in Chapter 2, you will see that the all look very
similar in either motion or action to the Cadet Assessments, and that's clearly by design.
Logged


Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,731

« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2018, 05:26:10 PM »

At my squadron, on PT nights we often do what we like to call "HARDCORE PT!" which is where somebody (in my case it's our Cadet Medical Officer) plans a very hard PT course-race where we do stuff such as pulling cinderblocks, fireman carrying, burpees, etc, etc. Pretty much anything that you would imagine that would be too hard we do it. 

Also for games, I would suggest Nerf gun wars, water balloon fights, Capture the Flag, Squirrels, Hardcore Sharks and Minnows, freeze tag, relay races, and Frisbee Football.

(Since this is a game two cadets made in our squadron I am just going to give you the rules for it)
Hardcore Sharks and Minnows:
Just like normal sharks and minnows, except with a few new rules. If you get tagged by a shark, you do 5 push-ups. Once you do that, you sit down on the spot that you got tagged in and be seaweed. If you get tagged by seaweed, then the seaweed decides how many push-ups you do, with a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 15. If you would like to do more push-ups, by all means, go for it.

C/SrA Cassie

Cadet Cassie, you are new to CAP, so there's no foul in your not being aware of the issues in your post, however
with that said, you have essentially provided a treatise on what not to do for CAP cadet PT, whether
that angle being safety, appropriateness for situation, or just common sense.

This would be an excellent thing for you, and your parents to discuss with the Unit Commander directly,
perhaps involving the next echelon to insure it gets the proper attention.

In all seriousness, none of those activities should be continued, including the pushups during
a team challenge - that can morph into hazing quickly, especially with the lack of adult supervision
which would seem apparent from the above.

Further to this, the only individuals who may be appointed as "Medical Officers" are adult members who are
also MDs, there is no role or position which in any way even alludes to a "Cadet Medical Officer", and in fact,
while cadets are encouraged to be included, CAPP 60-50 makes a point to indicate that adult members
are the ones to be in charge of PT activities.

The pamphlet also stresses that PT activities must be "appropriate to training goals" (paraphrased as NHQ had rendered
the PDF in a way that makes it difficult to quote).

None of those "hardcore PT" activities are appropriate for adolescents, especially in a CAP environment.  Consider
for a second the ramifications of dropping a cinder block on a foot wearing athletic shoes, or a cadet being driven
into the ground face-first by another cadet who is both incapable of carrying the weight, not to mention improperly
trained on technique, in regards to the fireman's carry. Made worse by it being a "race".

This is an excellent learning opportunity for both you, other cadets in your unit, and most importantly your leadership.

Eclipse,

Thank you for this information. If this makes it any better the senior members go over what he propose we should do for Hardcore PT before we actually do it, including the (SM) Saftey/Medical Officer. And before we do any of the exercises we are all demonstrated each week on how to do it even if we all already know how to do it. And for the cinder blocks, we drag it with rope on the ground. Also, for the fireman carry, females fireman carry other females, and males fireman carry other males (and no one is allowed to carry someone that would be too heavy for them). And even though this is a race like an event it is more of team-building exercises and from all the time we have done it nobody has gotten injured or out of hand instead, they've all worked together. And on top of that, we have more than one SM supervising to make sure it doesn't get out of hand, and the Cadet Medical Officer goes above and beyond making sure that nobody gets hurt.

But I will report anything I find unsafe with this information you shared with me. I am actually glad you did share this with me I was unaware of some of the stuff you pointed out.

Thanks,

C/SrA Cassie

This sums it up nicely...

*face palm*  You missed the entire point of what was said.....
Logged


jeders
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,077

« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2018, 05:59:22 PM »

Eclipse, have you even read the new physical fitness guide? Most of those activities that the cadet listed are specifically called out as good things to do (ultimate frisbee, freeze tag, CTF). The others, such as the Hardcore PT, all work towards what the PT guide says cadets SHOULD be doing; specifically, they are muscle building and aerobic activities.

Dragging cylinder blocks, fireman carries, and other nonsense like that are dangerous and not appropriate for cadets.
There is no place within the curriculum that these things are "recommended", and references to "hardcore PT" are clearly
intensity mismatch for the CAP Active Fitness Program.

When you look at the recommended activities in Chapter 2, you will see that the all look very
similar in either motion or action to the Cadet Assessments, and that's clearly by design.

First off, these exercises aren't really nonsense. Yes, they absolutely seem like ludicrous nonsense, but since just about every gym and fitness facility these days has some form of functional fitness class, I'm going to go ahead and say that they aren't as nonsensical as you might like to think. As for dangerous, any exercise is dangerous if done improperly; however, based on the cadets further responses it would seem that proper techniques and procedures are briefed for every exercise. So it would seem the danger is largely mitigated.

As for intensity mismatch, I don't buy that one either. This level of intensity is specifically called at in Chapter 2 of the activity guide as recommended.

Quote from: CAPP 60-50
Units are required to schedule a minimum of 1 hour of fitness programming each month. At least 45 minutes of that time should be moderate to vigorous physical activity
Emphasis mine.

Quote from: CAPP 60-50, Key Guidelines for Youth
Children and adolescents should include muscle-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days of the week.

Having participated in similar activities to the ones that this cadet alludes when I was much younger than any CAP cadet, I can say IMHO that the intensity and application are matched appropriately for adolescents in CAP. However, if you believe that these cadets are being put in danger with inappropriately matched activities, it is incumbent upon you to contact the appropriate leadership and make a complaint rather than tell cadets on the internet that they're wrong when they're simply trying to do right by their fellow members.
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If you are confident in you abilities and experience, whether someone else is impressed is irrelevant. - Eclipse
LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,809
Unit: Earth

« Reply #25 on: March 08, 2018, 06:31:36 PM »

Dragging cylinder blocks, fireman carries, and other nonsense like that are dangerous and not appropriate for cadets.
There is no place within the curriculum that these things are "recommended", and references to "hardcore PT" are clearly
intensity mismatch for the CAP Active Fitness Program.

When you look at the recommended activities in Chapter 2, you will see that the all look very
similar in either motion or action to the Cadet Assessments, and that's clearly by design.

Dragging cinderblocks (not cylinder) and burpees is not nonsense and are not dangerous.  Dropping a cinderblock on your toe is a mute point if it is being dragged.  Burpees, just like any other calisthenics, are hardly dangerous (do you even know what a burpee is?).  Nerf gun, Frisbee football, water balloon fights, capture the flag, relay races, etc are hardly dangerous.  At least, no more dangerous than the other items listed.  I am not sure what Squirrels is.  The Hardcore Sharks, I am not quite sure what it is so I will reserve full judgment.  The fireman's carry is about the only activity with a moderate potential due to back injury and dropping.  That depends on the ORM and risk management involved.  I think these activities fall inline with the intent of CAPP 60-50. 

Actually, capture the flag, relay races, freeze tag are specifically mentioned in Chapter 2.  Cooperation games, such as that described for shark and minnow, is also mentioned in Chapter 2.  Burpees fall into a potential act for fitness circuit as they also work the muscles involved in the cadet assessment.  If you think dragging cinderblocks and fireman carry's are dangerous, what do you think about the mud run, adventure races, and obstacle course listed in Chapter 2.

As far as intensity mismatch, I do not think so from what the OP described.  However, that depends on the local activities.

Also, the SM is responsible for leading the academics and leading the activities.  Which I take the leading activities as a more indirect leadership by approving the activity, assessing the risk, and supervising the cadet leadership.  After all, it specific states that cadet leadership should be leading the activity and planning them. 

Quote
Cadet officers or NCOs should lead the unit during fitness training and serve as fitness mentors whenever possible.  The training plan devised by a ranking cadet and the activities he or she selects should first be reviewed by the squadron fitness officer to ensure the intended program conforms to the guidelines found throughout this pamphlet.

Emphasis mine.  So I think her unit is doing just fine, assuming the SMs are properly supervising, which she states is happening.  So looks like it is meeting the intention of CAPP 60-50.   
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,731

« Reply #26 on: March 08, 2018, 06:41:32 PM »

Just to leave things on the table, obviously I have no issue with the appropriate team activities,
not sure how anyone could read what I said and infer that, but regardless.  CTF, relays, Frisbee football,
whatever, are all appropriate and all that is necessary.

Eclipse, have you even read the new physical fitness guide? Most of those activities that the cadet listed are specifically called out as good things to do (ultimate frisbee, freeze tag, CTF). The others, such as the Hardcore PT, all work towards what the PT guide says cadets SHOULD be doing; specifically, they are muscle building and aerobic activities.

Dragging cylinder blocks, fireman carries, and other nonsense like that are dangerous and not appropriate for cadets.
There is no place within the curriculum that these things are "recommended", and references to "hardcore PT" are clearly
intensity mismatch for the CAP Active Fitness Program.

When you look at the recommended activities in Chapter 2, you will see that the all look very
similar in either motion or action to the Cadet Assessments, and that's clearly by design.

First off, these exercises aren't really nonsense. Yes, they absolutely seem like ludicrous nonsense, but since just about every gym and fitness facility these days has some form of functional fitness class, I'm going to go ahead and say that they aren't as nonsensical as you might like to think. As for dangerous, any exercise is dangerous if done improperly; however, based on the cadets further responses it would seem that proper techniques and procedures are briefed for every exercise. So it would seem the danger is largely mitigated.

As for intensity mismatch, I don't buy that one either. This level of intensity is specifically called at in Chapter 2 of the activity guide as recommended.

It's an intensity mismatch in that the CAP active fitness program is, by no means "hardcore", so either the intensity is
incorrect (which it appears to be), or the nomenclature is a silly affectation.  Either way it's inappropriate.

Quote from: CAPP 60-50
Units are required to schedule a minimum of 1 hour of fitness programming each month. At least 45 minutes of that time should be moderate to vigorous physical activity

There are any number of appropriate activities indicated in chapter two, none of which require building materials
or one cadet carrying another.  This is absolutely a 78 waiting for the names to be filled in.  No SE or
experienced adult member(s) would allow for this to be occurring during normal PT, especially as a race - it's not even done as
part of ES training.

Quote from: CAPP 60-50, Key Guidelines for Youth
Children and adolescents should include muscle-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days of the week.
That's a very nice recommendation - CAP doesn't have their cadets "at least 3 days a week", therefore it should use it's time wisely and appropriately
to help cadets prepare for the assessments, which have been designed to meet the goals of the CP as NHQ defines it today.

Having participated in similar activities to the ones that this cadet alludes when I was much younger than any CAP cadet, I can say IMHO that the intensity and application are matched appropriately for adolescents in CAP.

Using an example of something you, or anyone else may have done "BITD" doesn't make it right for
today's program (nor today's adolescents).  The program is the program.
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LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,809
Unit: Earth

« Reply #27 on: March 08, 2018, 06:58:51 PM »

It's an intensity mismatch in that the CAP active fitness program is, by no means "hardcore", so either the intensity is
incorrect (which it appears to be), or the nomenclature is a silly affectation.  Either way it's inappropriate.

Just a silly affectation to the name, but not an inappropriate mismatch for intensity, as described by the OP.

Quote
No SE or
experienced adult member(s) would allow for this to be occurring during normal PT, especially as a race - it's not even done as
part of ES training.

Well that is demonstrably wrong.  I know plenty of experienced adult members and CP leaders that would allow this (and have).  Heck, I might even see if a group of cadets want to do a mud run or an adventure run as suggested as a weekend activity in Chapter 2.  Would be fun.  Want to join?

Quote
That's a very nice recommendation - CAP doesn't have their cadets "at least 3 days a week", therefore it should use it's time wisely and appropriately
to help cadets prepare for the assessments, which have been designed to meet the goals of the CP as NHQ defines it today.

Which demonstrates you did not understand CAPP 60-50.  The purpose of the new physical fitness program is not to prepare them for the assessment.  The goal is clearly stated "the goal of the cadet physical fitness program is to increase cadets' physical fitness and to motivate them to develop a lifelong habit of regular activity".  Interesting, no mention of preparing for the assessment.  The assessment is only 1/5 of the physical fitness program.  It is important for the promotion, but the CPFT is not the main goal of the physical fitness program.  Increasing physical fitness and to motivate them towards regular activity is the goal. 

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jeders
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,077

« Reply #28 on: March 09, 2018, 09:34:57 AM »

Quote
That's a very nice recommendation - CAP doesn't have their cadets "at least 3 days a week", therefore it should use it's time wisely and appropriately
to help cadets prepare for the assessments, which have been designed to meet the goals of the CP as NHQ defines it today.

Which demonstrates you did not understand CAPP 60-50.  The purpose of the new physical fitness program is not to prepare them for the assessment.  The goal is clearly stated "the goal of the cadet physical fitness program is to increase cadets' physical fitness and to motivate them to develop a lifelong habit of regular activity".  Interesting, no mention of preparing for the assessment.  The assessment is only 1/5 of the physical fitness program.  It is important for the promotion, but the CPFT is not the main goal of the physical fitness program.  Increasing physical fitness and to motivate them towards regular activity is the goal.

Couldn't have said it better myself.
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If you are confident in you abilities and experience, whether someone else is impressed is irrelevant. - Eclipse
abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,555
Unit: Classified

« Reply #29 on: March 09, 2018, 10:18:41 AM »

Burpee's are counterproductive and a smoke you exercise even if done right has a high chance of injury.  Having been put through "hardcore" pt programs most are nonsense and more harmful than good.

It is ill advised for cadets to be doing any type of carry for pt regardless of demonstration and technique.  That is a preventable mishap and lawsuit waiting to happen. And dragging pulling cinder blocks another mishap waiting to happen.  But hey the OP's leadership has assumed the risk for it so lets hope they take the hits when something happens.
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jeders
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,077

« Reply #30 on: March 09, 2018, 10:43:39 AM »

Burpee's are counterproductive and a smoke you exercise even if done right has a high chance of injury.  Having been put through "hardcore" pt programs most are nonsense and more harmful than good.

It sounds to me like you've been doing burpees the wrong way. If done correctly, the assessment/exercise is no more dangerous than walking down the street; if done incorrectly it can be very bad for your back and shoulders.
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If you are confident in you abilities and experience, whether someone else is impressed is irrelevant. - Eclipse
The_CAP_Life_Chose_Me
Recruit

Posts: 39

« Reply #31 on: March 09, 2018, 10:44:36 AM »

To Whom this may Concern,

If this helps any we still do our normal stretching and PT before we even do "hardcore PT." And for Hardcore PT we always make sure that everything is safe by checking the place to make sure no one can get hurt, we even go over all of the exercises, we make sure that nobody has any injuries and if they do they can't participate in it, also if a cadet is too tired to go on and do hardcore PT s/he doesn't do it, and we do safety briefing for PT on most of those days.
Also, "Hardcore PT" is as someone mentioned a bit of a silly name wording. Hardcore PT is pretty much your every day PT just throwing in a few difficult stuff. And to just clarify so no one is worried before we do the exercises the Senior Members goes over every exercise to make sure it's safe before we do it. I can guarantee you that my squadron goes above and beyond all of that to make sure we are safe.

On a side note, I really though appreciate your concerns for me and my squadron. I am glad we have so many caring members in this program and I can honestly say that it is encouraging. But still, with that being said, I don't appreciate my squadron being talked bad-mouth about because you don't agree with what we are doing. I trust my Senior Members and my Cadet NCOs. Don't get me wrong I am thankful you are expressing to me you guys concerns to me but it's getting a bit out of hand, and my squadron has been given the green flag to do this. We've even done this on a White Flag Inspection (which is where the Air Force comes to check out our squadron and see how we are doing things and see if we are doing it properly) and they all were fine with what we were doing.

I mean no offense to anyone, again thank you all for caring.

Thanks,

C/SrA Cassie
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C/SSgt Cassie
jeders
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,077

« Reply #32 on: March 09, 2018, 10:48:04 AM »

To Whom this may Concern,

If this helps any we still do our normal stretching and PT before we even do "hardcore PT." And for Hardcore PT we always make sure that everything is safe by checking the place to make sure no one can get hurt, we even go over all of the exercises, we make sure that nobody has any injuries and if they do they can't participate in it, also if a cadet is too tired to go on and do hardcore PT s/he doesn't do it, and we do safety briefing for PT on most of those days.
Also, "Hardcore PT" is as someone mentioned a bit of a silly name wording. Hardcore PT is pretty much your every day PT just throwing in a few difficult stuff. And to just clarify so no one is worried before we do the exercises the Senior Members goes over every exercise to make sure it's safe before we do it. I can guarantee you that my squadron goes above and beyond all of that to make sure we are safe.

On a side note, I really though appreciate your concerns for me and my squadron. I am glad we have so many caring members in this program and I can honestly say that it is encouraging. But still, with that being said, I don't appreciate my squadron being talked bad-mouth about because you don't agree with what we are doing. I trust my Senior Members and my Cadet NCOs. Don't get me wrong I am thankful you are expressing to me you guys concerns to me but it's getting a bit out of hand, and my squadron has been given the green flag to do this. We've even done this on a White Flag Inspection (which is where the Air Force comes to check out our squadron and see how we are doing things and see if we are doing it properly) and they all were fine with what we were doing.

I mean no offense to anyone, again thank you all for caring.

Thanks,

C/SrA Cassie

Don't worry cadet, your squadron appears from here to be doing fine and doing things correctly with the safety briefs and making sure that everyone and everything is up to snuff. There are just a few curmudgeons on this board who like to argue; they'll get over it, they always do.
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If you are confident in you abilities and experience, whether someone else is impressed is irrelevant. - Eclipse
The_CAP_Life_Chose_Me
Recruit

Posts: 39

« Reply #33 on: March 09, 2018, 10:51:16 AM »

To Whom this may Concern,

If this helps any we still do our normal stretching and PT before we even do "hardcore PT." And for Hardcore PT we always make sure that everything is safe by checking the place to make sure no one can get hurt, we even go over all of the exercises, we make sure that nobody has any injuries and if they do they can't participate in it, also if a cadet is too tired to go on and do hardcore PT s/he doesn't do it, and we do safety briefing for PT on most of those days.
Also, "Hardcore PT" is as someone mentioned a bit of a silly name wording. Hardcore PT is pretty much your every day PT just throwing in a few difficult stuff. And to just clarify so no one is worried before we do the exercises the Senior Members goes over every exercise to make sure it's safe before we do it. I can guarantee you that my squadron goes above and beyond all of that to make sure we are safe.

On a side note, I really though appreciate your concerns for me and my squadron. I am glad we have so many caring members in this program and I can honestly say that it is encouraging. But still, with that being said, I don't appreciate my squadron being talked bad-mouth about because you don't agree with what we are doing. I trust my Senior Members and my Cadet NCOs. Don't get me wrong I am thankful you are expressing to me you guys concerns to me but it's getting a bit out of hand, and my squadron has been given the green flag to do this. We've even done this on a White Glove Inspection (which is where the Air Force comes to check out our squadron and see how we are doing things and see if we are doing it properly) and they all were fine with what we were doing.

I mean no offense to anyone, again thank you all for caring.

Thanks,

C/SrA Cassie

Don't worry cadet, your squadron appears from here to be doing fine and doing things correctly with the safety briefs and making sure that everyone and everything is up to snuff. There are just a few curmudgeons on this board who like to argue; they'll get over it, they always do.

Jeders,

Thank you for this, I really appreciate it.

Thanks,

C/SrA Cassie
« Last Edit: March 09, 2018, 12:59:46 PM by The_CAP_Life_Chose_Me » Logged
C/SSgt Cassie
abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,555
Unit: Classified

« Reply #34 on: March 09, 2018, 12:03:31 PM »

Again the cadets leadership assumes the risk.  Let's see if they assume the responsibility when a cadet dislocates something or is dropped on their head.

BTW no such thing as a white flag inspection and the AF typically inspects the wings not individual squadrons.
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LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,809
Unit: Earth

« Reply #35 on: March 09, 2018, 12:24:13 PM »

Again the cadets leadership assumes the risk.  Let's see if they assume the responsibility when a cadet dislocates something or is dropped on their head.

Considering that her Wing CV is on here, I am sure he will take care of any unsafe conditions that would put the cadets in harms way.
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Spam
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,079
Unit: GA-001

« Reply #36 on: March 10, 2018, 01:46:11 AM »

(Sigh... bringin' me into this...  :o)

The Wing/CC and I both visited this unit on its FEB 2018 PT meeting. An example of their creative approach to making PT fun was the use of a "PT Quiz Bowl" where two cadet flights competed to answer leadership and AE questions, with the losing team doing pushups, flutter kicks, jumping jacks, etc. Spice was added by doing it in the back of an (air museum) C-141, originally built at the Lockheed Georgia factory a half mile down the road. Soft exercise mats were correctly placed on the antiskid coverings on the metal deck for floor exercises. Safety brief given. Cadets bussed to the nearby Dobbins AFB official mile run course. Adequate lighting was available. Ample SM escorts were present. Exercises (none were oddball) were spelled out and demo'd by staff. (Happy, Eclipse?)

Note, the Wing Commander and I broke an apparent final tie by correctly answering an AE question about the Montgolfier Bros. whereupon she and I both joined in 50 exercise reps, and I think someone took pics. I'm not sure but I never remember a Wing CO or her vice doing PT with us when I was a cadet...

Folks, as polite and responsive as this cadet is, and meaning no offense to her, please take her insights and comments with a grain of salt (e.g. cadet medical officer). She is a new member who is honestly reporting her honest impressions of a program being supervised in her unit by a (SM) LTC who is a 30 year member Master rated CP officer and former Wing DCP.

V/r
Spam





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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,555
Unit: Classified

« Reply #37 on: March 10, 2018, 01:58:32 AM »

(Sigh... bringin' me into this...  :o)

The Wing/CC and I both visited this unit on its FEB 2018 PT meeting. An example of their creative approach to making PT fun was the use of a "PT Quiz Bowl" where two cadet flights competed to answer leadership and AE questions, with the losing team doing pushups, flutter kicks, jumping jacks, etc. Spice was added by doing it in the back of an (air museum) C-141, originally built at the Lockheed Georgia factory a half mile down the road. Soft exercise mats were correctly placed on the antiskid coverings on the metal deck for floor exercises. Safety brief given. Cadets bussed to the nearby Dobbins AFB official mile run course. Adequate lighting was available. Ample SM escorts were present. Exercises (none were oddball) were spelled out and demo'd by staff. (Happy, Eclipse?)

Note, the Wing Commander and I broke an apparent final tie by correctly answering an AE question about the Montgolfier Bros. whereupon she and I both joined in 50 exercise reps, and I think someone took pics. I'm not sure but I never remember a Wing CO or her vice doing PT with us when I was a cadet...

Folks, as polite and responsive as this cadet is, and meaning no offense to her, please take her insights and comments with a grain of salt (e.g. cadet medical officer). She is a new member who is honestly reporting her honest impressions of a program being supervised in her unit by a (SM) LTC who is a 30 year member Master rated CP officer and former Wing DCP.

V/r
Spam

Congrats on the job promotion.  As I've said before fine and dandy doing this routine. Obviously the unit, group and by your own admission wing have bought the pt regimen fine by me. 

I just don't want to be the person who has to deal with a pissed off parent because cadet snuffy now has a split head requiring stitches and a concussion because cadet peanut dropped doing hardcore pt firemens carry.  But hey the liability is on you guys.
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Spam
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,079
Unit: GA-001

« Reply #38 on: March 10, 2018, 03:25:41 AM »


Abd, I hear you. I understand the risk-adverse issue, especially when considering the piss poor planning exhibited by many of our smaller or less well led units. Units going all "Gung Ho" without careful planning measures is a serious concern. (From that POV I need to retract my snark, Eclipse. I apologize, and I think I understand your good intent there Bob).


Some observations of things I think we need to do, to get this PT thing right:
1. Have frank and open discussions with new cadets and parents re: the program elements (expectation management). (Action: units).
2. Have frequent, accessible, and up to date TLC (Training Leader of Cadets) classes to train staff to standards (Action: Groups/Wings).
3. Update TLC with 2018 releases, inclusive of PT program, ASAP (Action: NHQ/CP)
4. Plan and game out events on a local level with approval of local unit/CC, the first line of review (Action: unit/cc)
5. VISIT and monitor adherence to standards and methods (Action: Group/Wing CP officers and command staff).

6. Revise the IG program to get back to being more than a box-checking compliance review of paperwork at the unit level. The IG team is the eyes of command, and the recent changes have made them do little more than check online reports. That pushes the need to higher commands to get off their fat rears (well, mine is although its very manly) and go visit and witness whats going on, rather than just trust that a very infrequent inspection will catch units that either don't do PT at all or do it with a degree of unsafe excess. (Action: IG)

7. Have the guts to step in and have difficult conversations, to pause events to counsel, mentor and guide, and if that won't work, to actually relieve and send certain people home when necessary. (Action: Commanders, Deputies).

8. Keep the focus on FUN as a fitness motivator. As a cadet basic (early 1980s), I <HATED> being dropped for pushups as punishment (which is hazing) and I later as a cadet NCO hated following the system at the time when I took part in the hazing by giving my subordinates pushups for failing to salute (or whatever). I dropped and did the pushups with them, and muttered to them while we did them together. The main issue is that the message to Cadet Spam was that "exercise = punishment", rather than "exercise = fun activity". We need to break that dysfunctional cycle and make exercise a fun thing. We cannot afford to raise future generations who equate exercise with pain/embarrassment. If we push fun exercise as a normalized activity, the passing fitness scores will follow. (Action: every member, cadet and SM).

9. Following on that note, we should remember the test is a measure of fitness (the HFZ), not the goal in and of itself. If we inspire and motivate cadets to play at fitness, they will begin playing/exercising on their own. Passing scores on quarterly fitness tests will then be an intermediate result - NOT the main goal, which is lifetime fitness. (Action: CP officers and cadet staffs).

10. Philosophically understand that trained leaders of cadets (including cadet staff) need to be pulling back gently on the reins occasionally (which is a FAR better case than beating a dead horse to do something active). At the same time, we need to be urging our reluctant members who do not (yet) have a habit of exercise to take part, to get active, and to get into the habit of getting moving and being fit. We need to understand that sometimes goofy events do provide that hard to quantify motivation for adolescents. (Don't lose that focus, Fellow Old Guys)! (Action: everyone).


My 0.02. Not necessarily policy of CAP, GAWG nor of my Commander. Just a best effort to comply/do this right.

Cheers
Spam




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Spam
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,079
Unit: GA-001

« Reply #39 on: March 10, 2018, 03:39:48 AM »

Congrats on the job promotion. 

Yeah... been almost a year now since I resigned a command to be a Vice Lord ("Ahhh... Our blockade is perfectly legal..."). The pay is far less in terms of immediate reward of seeing happy members grow (the REAL pay).

Someone (that luminous, unnamed "someone") should really put together a staff guide for Wing Staff, and one for Vice Lords. If we put some effort into quality control for those positions, we probably could head off many of the persistent problems that plague the average member (late promotions, lost awards, etc.). I know that we've been fighting that in my Wing, even as the average member seemingly expects perfect quality control and quick turnaround from quote, "Wing", even as said Wings are staffed by fellow volunteers with their own volunteer inefficiencies.

So: inputs for the next Command Council. Draft up some best practices/staff studies for Wing Staffers based on submitted Wing/Region inputs - share some lessons learned to fix the bottlenecks and choke points.

(OFF TOPIC - we return you to your regular programming at this time)

V/r
Spam


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Fester
Forum Regular

Posts: 171

« Reply #40 on: March 10, 2018, 03:42:02 AM »

Congrats on the job promotion. 

Yeah... been almost a year now since I resigned a command to be a Vice Lord ("Ahhh... Our blockade is perfectly legal..."). The pay is far less in terms of immediate reward of seeing happy members grow (the REAL pay).

Someone (that luminous, unnamed "someone") should really put together a staff guide for Wing Staff, and one for Vice Lords. If we put some effort into quality control for those positions, we probably could head off many of the persistent problems that plague the average member (late promotions, lost awards, etc.). I know that we've been fighting that in my Wing, even as the average member seemingly expects perfect quality control and quick turnaround from quote, "Wing", even as said Wings are staffed by fellow volunteers with their own volunteer inefficiencies.

So: inputs for the next Command Council. Draft up some best practices/staff studies for Wing Staffers based on submitted Wing/Region inputs - share some lessons learned to fix the bottlenecks and choke points.

(OFF TOPIC - we return you to your regular programming at this time)

V/r
Spam

Hell, I think those guidelines should be instituted (and/or tightened) at all levels.  Not just Wing.
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Spam
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,079
Unit: GA-001

« Reply #41 on: March 10, 2018, 04:37:18 AM »

Agreed Fester.

Hey suggest a new thread for a job guide: Cadet Program Officer (Code 216) PT guide!

V/r
Spam

(Hey mods is that curse filter working right? LOL clearly a double hockey sticks poted)
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,360
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #42 on: March 10, 2018, 08:18:33 PM »

The filter seems to have been loosened to allow common words containing proscribed words, like hello.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,252

« Reply #43 on: March 12, 2018, 10:42:00 AM »


Abd, I hear you. I understand the risk-adverse issue, especially when considering the piss poor planning exhibited by many of our smaller or less well led units. Units going all "Gung Ho" without careful planning measures is a serious concern. (From that POV I need to retract my snark, Eclipse. I apologize, and I think I understand your good intent there Bob).


Some observations of things I think we need to do, to get this PT thing right:
1. Have frank and open discussions with new cadets and parents re: the program elements (expectation management). (Action: units).
2. Have frequent, accessible, and up to date TLC (Training Leader of Cadets) classes to train staff to standards (Action: Groups/Wings).
3. Update TLC with 2018 releases, inclusive of PT program, ASAP (Action: NHQ/CP)
4. Plan and game out events on a local level with approval of local unit/CC, the first line of review (Action: unit/cc)
5. VISIT and monitor adherence to standards and methods (Action: Group/Wing CP officers and command staff).

6. Revise the IG program to get back to being more than a box-checking compliance review of paperwork at the unit level. The IG team is the eyes of command, and the recent changes have made them do little more than check online reports. That pushes the need to higher commands to get off their fat rears (well, mine is although its very manly) and go visit and witness whats going on, rather than just trust that a very infrequent inspection will catch units that either don't do PT at all or do it with a degree of unsafe excess. (Action: IG)

7. Have the guts to step in and have difficult conversations, to pause events to counsel, mentor and guide, and if that won't work, to actually relieve and send certain people home when necessary. (Action: Commanders, Deputies).

8. Keep the focus on FUN as a fitness motivator. As a cadet basic (early 1980s), I <HATED> being dropped for pushups as punishment (which is hazing) and I later as a cadet NCO hated following the system at the time when I took part in the hazing by giving my subordinates pushups for failing to salute (or whatever). I dropped and did the pushups with them, and muttered to them while we did them together. The main issue is that the message to Cadet Spam was that "exercise = punishment", rather than "exercise = fun activity". We need to break that dysfunctional cycle and make exercise a fun thing. We cannot afford to raise future generations who equate exercise with pain/embarrassment. If we push fun exercise as a normalized activity, the passing fitness scores will follow. (Action: every member, cadet and SM).

9. Following on that note, we should remember the test is a measure of fitness (the HFZ), not the goal in and of itself. If we inspire and motivate cadets to play at fitness, they will begin playing/exercising on their own. Passing scores on quarterly fitness tests will then be an intermediate result - NOT the main goal, which is lifetime fitness. (Action: CP officers and cadet staffs).

10. Philosophically understand that trained leaders of cadets (including cadet staff) need to be pulling back gently on the reins occasionally (which is a FAR better case than beating a dead horse to do something active). At the same time, we need to be urging our reluctant members who do not (yet) have a habit of exercise to take part, to get active, and to get into the habit of getting moving and being fit. We need to understand that sometimes goofy events do provide that hard to quantify motivation for adolescents. (Don't lose that focus, Fellow Old Guys)! (Action: everyone).


My 0.02. Not necessarily policy of CAP, GAWG nor of my Commander. Just a best effort to comply/do this right.

Cheers
Spam

Couldn't like this more  :clap:
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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Cadet Programs Management & Activities  |  Topic: New PT Requirements
 


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