February 23, 2020, 06:41:09 am

army distinctive unit insignia

Started by Arc light, September 04, 2017, 02:36:23 am

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Jester

Quote from: Red 6 on September 21, 2017, 05:26:50 pm
The SSI-FWTS (combat patch) and the CSIB are two different things. The CSIB is an identification badge. I've been researching it in Air Force regulations and instructions for wear on service dress, but haven't found very clear guidance.



I don't think the AFI will ever recognize this distinguishing point between the two.  In the AF, a badge is a badge is a badge.  People got all spun up about Ranger/SF tabs because the Army has various nomenclature for those kinds of things, but in the AF they're just badges, and subject to the same rules of wear.  The only real difference in types of badges as far as the AF is concerned is occupational and duty badges. 

Sounds like the new AF OCP guidance (restricted to AFCENT for now) allows wear of combat patches, so maybe in 10 years it'll be allowed AF-wide, and then CAP will have a case.

Mitchell 1969

September 21, 2017, 11:20:17 pm #21 Last Edit: September 22, 2017, 12:07:51 am by Mitchell 1969
Quote from: NIN on September 21, 2017, 06:09:20 pm
Quote from: Arc light on September 04, 2017, 02:36:23 am
I tried looking in 39-1, but could not find if we can wear our DUI on the cap uniform, I know we can wear military ribbons and badges, but could find specific insignia, thanks


Missed this the first time around.

Former soldier here. Short version: DUIs are not authorized on the AF uniform, and by extension, the CAP uniform.

The concept of a "unit crest" or "regimental affiliation" would make most "big Blue" folks heads asplode. :)


And that's without going into the fact that they are called Distinctive Unit Insignia and are not crests at all, from a heraldic standpoint. (The "crest" is the thing that goes at the top of an armorial achievement. Often seen atop a "helm" (helmet) but can also be placed above a "torse" (the twisted rope-looking thing). In CAP, for example, the crest is the eagle on top of everything.


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Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.

Red 6

It matters from a heraldic standpoint that they're not technically crests, but the fact is that generations of Soldiers call them 'unit crests.' (Which in any event, are not authorized on CAP uniforms.)

Mitchell 1969

Quote from: Red 6 on September 21, 2017, 11:40:14 pm
It matters from a heraldic standpoint that they're not technically crests, but the fact is that generations of Soldiers call them 'unit crests.' (Which in any event, are not authorized on CAP uniforms.)


Indeed. Which means that the moment to stop the practice was also generations ago. But, it isn't just in the Army.


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Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.

NIN

Quote from: Mitchell 1969 on September 21, 2017, 11:20:17 pm
And that's without going into the fact that they are called Distinctive Unit Insignia and are not crests at all, from a heraldic standpoint. (The "crest" is the thing that goes at the top of an armorial achievement. Often seen stop a "helm" (helmet) but can also be placed above a "torse" (the twisted rope-looking thing). In CAP, for example, the crest is the eagle on top of everything.


Bernie, I've known you for a long time. Next time I see you, I'm gonna kick you. :)

Darin Ninness, Col, CAP
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Mitchell 1969

Quote from: NIN on September 21, 2017, 11:57:01 pm
Quote from: Mitchell 1969 on September 21, 2017, 11:20:17 pm
And that's without going into the fact that they are called Distinctive Unit Insignia and are not crests at all, from a heraldic standpoint. (The "crest" is the thing that goes at the top of an armorial achievement. Often seen stop a "helm" (helmet) but can also be placed above a "torse" (the twisted rope-looking thing). In CAP, for example, the crest is the eagle on top of everything.


Bernie, I've known you for a long time. Next time I see you, I'm gonna try to kick you. :)


FTFY.
_________________
Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.

SarDragon

Q asked; Q answered.

The big kids are getting frisky; time to say bye-bye.

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Dave Bowles
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AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
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