Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 16, 2018, 01:23:46 AM
Home Help Login Register
News:

CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Safety  |  Topic: Medical Sections
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] Print
Author Topic: Medical Sections  (Read 28786 times)
sandman
Seasoned Member

Posts: 351

« Reply #100 on: July 24, 2007, 09:57:35 PM »

To my knowledge, no such animal as the USCG Aux Health Services exists.

Actually it does exist!

There are Coast Guard instructions outlining the program and I was almost a part of the program until my real military obligations cut into my volunteer time. Give me some time and I can cite the instructions.


When I looked into joining, one of the reasons I did not join was that they have no program even in place to deal with EMS personnel and have basically what we have except with minimal (and I do mean minimal) coverage. However, it is so minimal, that trying to get them to approve an AED on board a facility is almost impossible. They still are not covered for providing any serious medical emergency care.

Then you looked in the wrong direction!

Theyre pretty much in the same position we are. They do not recognize any health care professionals even to the extent that CAP does.

Negative. The USCG Aux is actually far ahead of CAP in utilizing healthcare personnel. Augmentation is done through local sectors with healthcare clinics. In order to work you must have credentials verified through the USCG and the gurus who run the healthcare augmentation program.

There are no identifying insignia, etc.
Not needed.

The only difference is that on an operation, they allow a flotilla crew that might have an EMT, nurse, doctor, etc aboard to call a land based hospital for minimal medical direction. Their first and primary course of action is to get a USCG AD vessel, helo, medical team, etc to evacuate the person from your facility. They dont even provide for Auxies to perform water rescues if it involves much more than dragging someone on board with a boat hook and they do not allow for something like assisting a distressed motorist by helping them fight a fire aboard their vessel. They have the same report and keep clear policy as we do. The only difference is they are willing to cut members some slack and pick up any slopped over liability if a member acts outside of regs. BTDT.

Sorry, you really don't know your USCG Aux capabilities. I submit that they are far advanced from CAP.

PS- the only time that your professional credentialling as a health care provider comes into play is you meet the exceptionally high security clearances to work as a force augmenter aboard a USCG facility or station.

Well, there you go! You made my point. The USCG Aux is actually a part of the USCG and the high application standards must be met. There are auxiliarists that are in sensitive positions requiring secret, maybe top secret, clearences. In contrast, look at our Civil Air Patrol...tell me what is wrong. I'm sure you can go on for days. Just check out the threads already posted on CAPTalk.

/r
LT
Logged
MAJ, US Army (Ret)
Major, Civil Air Patrol
Major, 144th Fighter Wing, Commander, Medical Flight
SARPilotNY
Forum Regular

Posts: 194

« Reply #101 on: July 24, 2007, 10:14:44 PM »

Hmmm, where to start. I believe the orig. issue was a discussion over the possible two options for enhancing medical care within CAP. I said I was in favor of option "B" and listed a couple of reasons why I thought option "A" would be a problem. My response was based upon my understanding of the terms natl. and regional in a CAP context. Your lengthy reply inferred I didn't know what I was talking about.

You went over your CV to demonstrate your background. Just so you know where I am coming from I will give you mine.

I have been a member of CAP as a cadet and SM for 45yrs. I have completed Level 4 and held sqdn and group commands. I have been a Wing DCP and did a stint as a Wing Dir. of Gnd. Ops. I am a GTL and MO. I have 7 distress finds, all ground and one save.

Yep, you guessed it I'm a physician assistant (PA). I've been a PA for 30yrs. I have a MPAS from U. of Neb and a MPH in Health Admin. I am NCCPA certified and  completed the US Army Medical Dept. Officer Basic Course. I  worked as an EMT in the bad old days prior to NREMT. I spent 5 yrs working for a large county EMSA, pop. 4.5 million covering >7200 sq. mi.,  doing training and credentialing. I have spent 15 yrs. assigned to a Type I NDMS/DMAT. I have deployed to such places as the WTC, Katrina/Rita, Hurricane Andrew and Northridge. I am semi-retired and instruct part-time in a natl. WMD/EMS program that comes under the Dept. of Homeland Security/Off. of Domestic Preparedness. I also spent 31 yrs as a CA POST certified Level I Reserve Officer in a 300+ officer dept where I wrote the proposal and helped establish their TAC/Med program.

You wrote that you are doing course work to become a "trauma physicians assistant" Are you in a PA program or did you mean you are completing the perquisites to apply?

CG Aux health care providers are credentialed by the Armed Forces Inst. of Pathology, Dept of Legal Medicine. A complete description of the program can be found in COMDTINST 6010.2B dtd 22 Feb 07 at this link http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-w/g-wk/wkh/pdf/COMDTINST%206010-2B_Revision_10_06_MOS_RECENT.pdf At this time there is no bling authorized for Aux health care providers, besides who needs it.

So let's just chalk this up to a personality conflict and move on. I apologize in advance to the other readers for the length of this post.


Hey you sound like I guy I ran into a while back...are you H. J. J. ?  or J. J. w/ SBPD?
Logged
CAP member 30 + years SAR Pilot, GTM, Base staff
SARPilotNY
Forum Regular

Posts: 194

« Reply #102 on: July 24, 2007, 10:21:57 PM »



Well, there you go! You made my point. The USCG Aux is actually a part of the USCG and the high application standards must be met. There are auxiliarists that are in sensitive positions requiring secret, maybe top secret, clearences. In contrast, look at our Civil Air Patrol...tell me what is wrong. I'm sure you can go on for days. Just check out the threads already posted on CAPTalk.

/r
LT
[/quote]I have been at the AFRCC at Langley and they let me right in the door, I went to the USCG SAR operations center and they wouldn't let me in the door as CAP.   I should them my other government (non military) ID and they cheerfully let me in.  Maybe they just wanted to keep the rest of the team out!
Logged
CAP member 30 + years SAR Pilot, GTM, Base staff
SARPilotNY
Forum Regular

Posts: 194

« Reply #103 on: July 24, 2007, 10:44:22 PM »

SAR MED...  I know you like to question my qualifications and others but if I am right...and what a small world...PA Guy and Ned are two guys I spent some time with.   Without blowing anyones cover...   Ned (Sir or better yet "You Honor") and PA Guy (as well as officer) are two very experienced and long standing members of Civil Air Patrol.   I think we all under estimate the knowledge and experience of many of our members.  If I am correct about these two,  both have way understated their qualifications and experience.  Your honor...care to render a verdict?  (am I right?)
PA Guy, didn't you spend some time in the south?
Logged
CAP member 30 + years SAR Pilot, GTM, Base staff
PA Guy
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 730

« Reply #104 on: July 25, 2007, 12:16:02 AM »

SAR MED...  I know you like to question my qualifications and others but if I am right...and what a small world...PA Guy and Ned are two guys I spent some time with.   Without blowing anyones cover...   Ned (Sir or better yet "You Honor") and PA Guy (as well as officer) are two very experienced and long standing members of Civil Air Patrol.   I think we all under estimate the knowledge and experience of many of our members.  If I am correct about these two,  both have way understated their qualifications and experience.  Your honor...care to render a verdict?  (am I right?)
PA Guy, didn't you spend some time in the south?

Correct on both counts.
Logged
sandman
Seasoned Member

Posts: 351

« Reply #105 on: July 25, 2007, 05:19:23 AM »

I have been at the AFRCC at Langley and they let me right in the door, I went to the USCG SAR operations center and they wouldn't let me in the door as CAP.   I should them my other government (non military) ID and they cheerfully let me in.  Maybe they just wanted to keep the rest of the team out!

I don't know what to tell you. DoD vs. DHS. AFRCC recognizes CAP people, USCG doesn't.

CAP has a lot of great volunteers. I feel the CAP structure as it is now doesn't recognize the great pool of contributers it has within it's ranks. CAP is too focused on cadets and "aerospace education" in my opinion...it's too "touchy-feeley". Maybe I'm missing the point of CAP, I don't know. Let's spin up operational assignments and let the cadet/areospace program fall off to those "touchy-feeley" types who want to be in charge of kids.
Logged
MAJ, US Army (Ret)
Major, Civil Air Patrol
Major, 144th Fighter Wing, Commander, Medical Flight
SARMedTech
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 798

« Reply #106 on: July 25, 2007, 06:09:19 AM »

SARPilot-

Im going to try to address you from now on as a fellow professional and hope that you will return the courtesy. It has been pointed out to me that I have been less than respectful in many of my posts and the message has been received by me 5x5. So please take my questions with the intent with which they were given.

During my EMS training, I worked with a private EMS agency. I worked many, many shifts with them, many mass casualty incidents including a hard landing of an out of state evac helo. When I left and then tried to go back, the agency had received DHS funding for BCNR (biological, chemical, nuclear, radiological) and WMD training and readiness. As such, they are partially under an MOU with DHS. I walked to the door, showed by photo ID to the duty medic and was turned away because I had shown up unannounced. Did you expect that the USCG SAR facility would just let you walk onto the station because you wanted to  be there.

This thread has drifted so a little more wont kill it. AE is important and the CP is very important. But in ES, everything we do, everything we train for carries the possibility of someone ending up dead if we do not do our jobs properly and with absolute excellence and professionalism on a par with our non-military auxiliary counterparts. The fact that the first flights to orbit over Ground Zero were CAP flights should tell us all something. We  are respected and trusted. Now it is time for us to earn the right to be revered and take our place among the best ES agencies in the world. The fact that we all volunteer is of no consequence to me. Training and educational standards must be stepped up. There are qualifications within CAP that should be as selective and rigorous as AFRCC Inland SAR school. Our operators must be trained to function as perfectly in extreme environments as they can on a table top. Our pilots must look at the GT and see professionals carrying out well planned and well executed operations. Our ground crews must know that the "primacy of the air: attitude is gone and has been permanently replaced the attitude of seamless interoperability adopted by most of our pilots.

We all have to work together. I see the need for more team building work for the SMs as we have with the cadets. My hope is that one day you and I will work an operation together and you will be able to look down from your plane as see a ground team utilizing the information you provide in the absolute best way that we can and that we can look up and know that we have pilots not worried about finds or saves, but rather about functioning as a team. An airplane is nothing more or less than a tool. Its an operational platform. We ground pounders carry and wear our platforms. Neither is better, neither is worse. If you tell me you need more color to see me, I need to learn to listen. If I ask you to trust that I am a capable and dedicated ground SAR pperator, I need you to do so. With out these aspects, CAP could well be on its way to being an expensive flight club and that would be the sad day when we ceased to serve our country in the best way we know how.
Logged
"Corpsman Up!"

"...The distinct possibility of dying slow, cold and alone...but you also get the chance to save lives, and there is no greater calling in the world than that."
SARPilotNY
Forum Regular

Posts: 194

« Reply #107 on: July 25, 2007, 09:12:44 PM »

Darn...I spent over an hour writting a great response ...it  was time out and lost!
Sar Med...no hard feelings.  I have only been on this board a short while but in CAP for a long time.  I find it interesting reading these topics what a small world it is.  There are some really neat old dogs as well as some great new members.  I was correct as to who PA Guy and Ned are.  I have found a couple more that I have worked with both professionally and in CAP in a couple other postings.  Their knowledge base is huge!  I throw stuff out often to invoke dialogue so we can all learn and exchange ideas.  Our organization is far from perfect but I think we all would like to see some productive change.  Your EMS issues are the same we had when I started in the program and as an EMT.  Little has changed.
Keep the gloves (boxing) on...
Logged
CAP member 30 + years SAR Pilot, GTM, Base staff
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] Print 
CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Safety  |  Topic: Medical Sections
 


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.14 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.064 seconds with 25 queries.