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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Hysterical History  |  Topic: Air Police
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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,532
Unit: Classified

« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2015, 12:40:45 AM »

Yeah, here's a pic of me in Afghanistan not standing at a gate or writing tickets.  In fact, as a Defender, I've never written a ticket.



The cool thing about Security Forces is that you can do everything or you can be absolutely miserable; which 9 times out of 10 is self-inflicted.

I happen to disagree with the career field merging in the 1990s from two separate careers (law enforcement and security).  I think the Air Force did the career field a disservice by expecting the largest enlisted career field in the Air Force to be jacks of all trades.  You can graduate tech school and go to an Air Base Defense Squadron/Group where you do nothing but training for deployments and deploy (lots of schools in this area), or you can get shipped off to a large base and do nothing but law enforcement patrol.  Then there's nuke security, which has a very low likelihood of getting involved in anything unless there is a catastrophic breakdown and the world is under siege, but those nuke guys get A LOT of awesome training and support.

Some parts to the career field some don't realize exist:

- Combat Arms Training and Maintenance (CATM) - firearms instructors and expert amrorers.

- K-9 Handler, but narcotics and bomb dogs.

- Raven and DAGRE - aircraft security for USAF AMC (Raven) or AFSOC (DAGRE) headed to austere and non-secure locations.

- Military Police Investigations

- Special Response Team (SRT) - AF's version of a SWAT team.  I could post some pics and you wouldn't know the difference between them and a civilian SWAT team.

- Standard law enforcement duties - think patrolling, writing tickets, investigating accidents, etc.

- Nuclear security - you secure the nation's most lethal assets, period.  See video I posted a few above this post.

- Contingency Response Group (CRG) - is the AF's "quick response" assets that consists of engineers, commo dudes, and a huge contingent of Security Forces.  These guys are jump qualified, many graduate air assault school, and a number of other non-traditional schools usually exclusive to the Army.  These guys deploy on short-notice missions to anywhere in the world and can secure an air field in advance of larger forces.

Schools USAF Defenders can attend:
- Close Precision Engagement Course (CPEC) - AF's version of sniper school
- Advanced Designated Marksman Course - A little less intense than CPEC and used for LP/OP positions and overwatch.
- Integrated Defense, Command and Control School - big picture C2 course for Defenders
- Combat Leaders Course - an intense 6 week advanced combat tactics course (must be E5/SSgt)
- Airborne School
- Air Assault School
- Ranger School
- Electronic Security Systems
- Protective Services and Anti-Terrorism Driving (think close protection/body guard stuff)
- Military Police Investigations - intense 8 week investigations course
- Tactical Driving Operations Course
- Raven School
- DAGRE School
- K9 Handler
- Combat Arms Instructor
- Security Engineering Course
- Anti-Terrorism Courses

And a countless other joint-service, civilian, federal, and private sector courses.

But those who complain about the career field are usually those that thought they'd be "cops" or failed out of PJ/CCT, and blame everyone but themselves for where they ended up.

Yes, you will likely stand a gate at some point, but if you lack potential, drive, and ambition, your time on a gate will be much longer than it should. 

I have a friend, A TSgt, who just left the Andrews AFB SRT (SWAT) and is now at a USAF Special Operations detachment where part of his pre-deployment train-up included letting his facial hair grow.  What is he doing?  I have no idea, but even the "cool guys' aircraft" need security.

 :clap: :clap: :)

My last few years in I worked close with OSI and off base folks on stuff.  :)  in 2007 outside of OSI I had the highest drug seizure for the installation. 
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,337
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« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2015, 12:48:54 AM »

I got stopped on base a few weeks ago. A1C cop tells me "sir, you need to make sure all 4 wheels come to a stop at a stop sign". I politely asked him how it was possible that one or two wheels could keep spinning. He offered up a confused look and a warning.

I was driving in snow this past weekend. It's certainly possible under those conditions.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
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Private Investigator
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« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2015, 02:49:28 AM »

Yeah, here's a pic of me in Afghanistan not standing at a gate or writing tickets.  In fact, as a Defender, I've never written a ticket.



The cool thing about Security Forces is that you can do everything or you can be absolutely miserable; which 9 times out of 10 is self-inflicted.

Thank you for sharing.  8)
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Private Investigator
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« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2015, 02:53:53 AM »

and very few have the gusto to do he job.
And most of us are too smart for the job.   >:D

Some of the smartest folks in the AF I know are cops...

And some of the dumbest people I've met in the Air Force were cops.

It's a big career field that needs lots of bodies and Lackland doesn't do them any favors.

I agree with Phil. In the Marines we had a lot of dummies in the Military Police otherwise how else did I get "Military Policeman of the Year", twice.  ;)
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abdsp51
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« Reply #24 on: November 30, 2015, 04:56:31 AM »

and very few have the gusto to do he job.
And most of us are too smart for the job.   >:D

Some of the smartest folks in the AF I know are cops...

And some of the dumbest people I've met in the Air Force were cops.

It's a big career field that needs lots of bodies and Lackland doesn't do them any favors.

I agree with Phil. In the Marines we had a lot of dummies in the Military Police otherwise how else did I get "Military Policeman of the Year", twice.  ;)

Maybe.  But for every dumb cop I can show at least 2 dumb mx/ac/med etc...
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goblin
Forum Regular

Posts: 174

« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2015, 05:59:10 AM »

I got stopped on base a few weeks ago. A1C cop tells me "sir, you need to make sure all 4 wheels come to a stop at a stop sign". I politely asked him how it was possible that one or two wheels could keep spinning. He offered up a confused look and a warning.

I was driving in snow this past weekend. It's certainly possible under those conditions.

I don't think that's what he was getting at, especially at MacDill
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Luis R. Ramos
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Posts: 2,616

« Reply #26 on: November 30, 2015, 12:46:38 PM »

Some of you are referring to military police as dumb, or disparaging them...

My only encounter with a military cop?    :clap: :clap: :clap:

And I was in the wrong!!!

I was at West Point, and I did a u-turn... on a yellow line which I did not see. A few car lengths away an MP in his patrol car saw me, he yelled at me. I apologized said I did not see it, and he just let me go with a warning. no ticket, nothing. He could have stopped me easily as I turned towards him. He could have let me wait some time, or give me a ticket.

On the other hand, when I saw them give out tickets was when drivers had parked cars by the post Flag staff when they were to have Retreat or Revellie at the USMA. Times when there were supposed to be no cars there as they needed all the space to work up or down the Post Colors.

To those guys that were ticketed then, it was clearly posted. Do not yell at those MP, they were doing their jobs. You put them in peril when you left your car there...
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winterg
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« Reply #27 on: November 30, 2015, 12:55:21 PM »

I think peril may be a bit strong of a word.  Haha

I was one of those that wanted to be an Air Force cop on active.  I was a crew chief and tried twice to change my AFSC but was told that crew chiefs were priority fields and not allowed to move out at that time.
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Flying Pig
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Posts: 5,043

« Reply #28 on: December 01, 2015, 09:52:10 AM »

Its overall pretty lame to insult a particular job regardless of what it is.  The great thing about the military is there is pretty much something for everyone.  In particular with the USAF, nuclear security would be a great way to train up and get the credibility for someone wanting to later get into LE or high end security fields.  I had a great time as Marine Security Forces (separate MOS from MPs completely)  At 19-20yrs old I was able to see some pretty interesting things.  Ill admit, as a 19yr old E-3, its pretty crazy to be about 50' feet from a Boomer with an M240G machine-gun as they are pulling the missiles out of the tubes and loading them in 18 wheelers.  I quite frankly wasnt the slightest bit concerned with learning a job skill for civilian life. When I joined I wanted to paint myself green and carry a machine-gun.  And thats pretty much what I did.  Now.... if only the rest of you could aspire to such greatness! >:D
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LSThiker
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« Reply #29 on: December 01, 2015, 11:50:37 AM »

Its overall pretty lame to insult a particular job regardless of what it is.

The infantry and infantry support (the rest of the Army) may like to mock the medical branch for being too easy, but when they are bleeding out, guess who they call first?    :)
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Flying Pig
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« Reply #30 on: December 01, 2015, 12:02:50 PM »

As a grunt, I always made fun of cooks... .I had a buddy who was a cook and we got into it one night (all in good fun) while on deployment.  A while later, we come back from a week in the field and make it in just in time for the chow hall.  Every once in a while they would serve breakfast all day.  French toast and omelets to order.  I think it was training for the new cooks.... I dunno....  So that night Im making my way through the omelet line.  He steps in and relieves the PFC who was on the griddle as I walk up and says in a smart a-- voice  "Well Well Well..... look whose come to apologize.  I knew you'd come crawling in eventually"   >:D  Dude made me a great omelet....after I said I was sorry.  He caught me crossing my fingers too. 
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Stonewall
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« Reply #31 on: December 01, 2015, 12:53:17 PM »

Its overall pretty lame to insult a particular job regardless of what it is.

The infantry and infantry support (the rest of the Army) may like to mock the medical branch for being too easy, but when they are bleeding out, guess who they call first?    :)

A combat medic.
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LSThiker
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Posts: 1,807
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« Reply #32 on: December 01, 2015, 01:16:41 PM »

Its overall pretty lame to insult a particular job regardless of what it is.

The infantry and infantry support (the rest of the Army) may like to mock the medical branch for being too easy, but when they are bleeding out, guess who they call first?    :)

A combat medic.

Which belong to AMEDD :)
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Flying Pig
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« Reply #33 on: December 01, 2015, 02:38:41 PM »

Real men scream "Corpsman!"   >:D
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THRAWN
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Posts: 1,859

« Reply #34 on: December 01, 2015, 03:02:51 PM »

Real men scream "Corpsman!"   >:D

And real men come running...
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Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
AFRCC SMC 10-97
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Brit_in_CAP
Seasoned Member

Posts: 389
Unit: MER-VA-002

« Reply #35 on: December 01, 2015, 03:03:22 PM »

When I joined I wanted to paint myself green and carry a machine-gun.  And thats pretty much what I did.  Now.... if only the rest of you could aspire to such greatness! >:D

Back in my RAF days I had friends in MSF, on our airbase.  Great fun to be around, and cool gear, compared to ours.  They loaned us M16s with MILES equipment and spent a day training with us to help improve our effectiveness as Immediate Reaction Force; we were all Techs, and that was our "war task" as there was no RAF Regiment based with us.  My first intro to the USMC.  Their job could get boring for sure, standing guard in towers at the facility but it had its moments, apparently, as they all seemed to enjoy the tour.
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MSG Mac
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« Reply #36 on: December 01, 2015, 03:31:39 PM »

Its overall pretty lame to insult a particular job regardless of what it is.

The infantry and infantry support (the rest of the Army) may like to mock the medical branch for being too easy, but when they are bleeding out, guess who they call first?    :)

I knew a navy corpsman who was given 30 days in the brig for an infraction. Because they were short of medical personnel he was still working sick call during the day. Whenever a brig guard came in for a shot, he made sure the vaccine was fresh from the refrigerator  and had the consistency of glue. Moral: Don't mess with the Doc!
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Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,807
Unit: Earth

« Reply #37 on: December 01, 2015, 04:15:24 PM »

I knew a navy corpsman who was given 30 days in the brig for an infraction. Because they were short of medical personnel he was still working sick call during the day. Whenever a brig guard came in for a shot, he made sure the vaccine was fresh from the refrigerator  and had the consistency of glue. Moral: Don't mess with the Doc!

Sounds like my sister that needed to give a urethral cath to a man that was sexually harassing her.   
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raivo
Seasoned Member

Posts: 442
Unit: Migrant

« Reply #38 on: December 01, 2015, 11:58:05 PM »

In particular with the USAF, nuclear security would be a great way to train up and get the credibility for someone wanting to later get into LE or high end security fields.

Ehhh. WSA/missile cop is not nearly as glamorous/marketable as you might think.
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1Lt, CAP
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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,532
Unit: Classified

« Reply #39 on: December 02, 2015, 12:01:26 AM »

In particular with the USAF, nuclear security would be a great way to train up and get the credibility for someone wanting to later get into LE or high end security fields.

Ehhh. WSA/missile cop is not nearly as glamorous/marketable as you might think.

Nope.  Very few of those guys have a easy time with adapting to reg duties when they come out of the fields.
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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Hysterical History  |  Topic: Air Police
 


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