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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Aviation & Flying Activities  |  Topic: ppl instructor wanted
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Author Topic: ppl instructor wanted  (Read 5867 times)
md
Recruit

Posts: 24

« Reply #20 on: September 16, 2011, 03:26:44 PM »

You've got to be a cadet under 18 to receive instruction

Cadets can train in anything, SMs can train toward PPL or anything else in gliders (and maybe balloons? anyone know?), and MPs (or SMs with PPLs and the right permission) can get any further ratings or licenses in airplanes.



I need a  CAP instructor to begin my flight training through the civil air patrol.

I'm with everybody else - much easier to do it outside CAP. Good luck!
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Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,043

« Reply #21 on: September 16, 2011, 03:37:32 PM »

Cadet,

I think you need to sit down with your chain of command and discuss your needs and wants.  I would doubt you are going to find a CAP CFI willing to donate all of their time to you.  And I find it HIGHLY unlikely that CAP is going to let you use their plane for upwards of 50-60 flight hours by just paying for gas. 


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coudano
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,124

« Reply #22 on: September 16, 2011, 05:36:33 PM »

Cadet,

I think you need to sit down with your chain of command and discuss your needs and wants.  I would doubt you are going to find a CAP CFI willing to donate all of their time to you.  And I find it HIGHLY unlikely that CAP is going to let you use their plane for upwards of 50-60 flight hours by just paying for gas.

It just depends...
we have a CFI at my squadron who has done this for cadets multiple times over the years.

and I'm not aware of a CAP plane that has sooooo many hours on it that they need to fly it less (hey cool it, guys)

it's not impossible, you just have to see what's available locally
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Short Field
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,003

« Reply #23 on: September 16, 2011, 05:39:57 PM »

Most of us don't get to fly CAP aircraft by just paying for gas.  Some wings have discounted flying hours available but they tend to be limited.   
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SAR/DR MP, ARCHOP, AOBD, GTM1, GBD, LSC, FASC, LO, PIO, MSO(T), & IC2
Wilson #2640
EMT-83
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,873

« Reply #24 on: September 16, 2011, 05:56:57 PM »

Even with MX costs, it still has to be cheaper than renting that aging 172 from the FBO.
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JeffDG
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 3,157

« Reply #25 on: September 16, 2011, 06:32:40 PM »

Even with MX costs, it still has to be cheaper than renting that aging 172 from the FBO.
I know our wet rate is well below what FBOs charge.
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mon876
Recruit

Posts: 8

« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2011, 07:15:48 PM »

A Q for the OP - what difference will it make, going into the Navy, whether you have your PPL or not?

Complete hearsay, but viewed from my perspective, he is saying he wants to get his PPL, through CAP as a cadet, before he turns 18- at that point he joins the Navy and is no longer a cadet (and won't have time for getting a PPL for a long time).

But I could be completely wrong here.
you are completly correct. i wont havemuch time after im 18 because of college and work. also my parent are paying for it now.
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spaatzmom
Seasoned Member

Posts: 288

« Reply #27 on: September 16, 2011, 07:54:06 PM »

When my son took flight lessons via CAP out of Clearwater- St. Pete, the plane was $35/ hour plus av gas.  This was back in 2005-06 time frame.  It took quite a while to sign on a pilot for the lessons then even going through his commander.  Good luck.
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,402
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #28 on: September 17, 2011, 03:42:14 AM »

A Q for the OP - what difference will it make, going into the Navy, whether you have your PPL or not?

Complete hearsay, but viewed from my perspective, he is saying he wants to get his PPL, through CAP as a cadet, before he turns 18- at that point he joins the Navy and is no longer a cadet (and won't have time for getting a PPL for a long time).

But I could be completely wrong here.
you are completly correct. i wont havemuch time after im 18 because of college and work. also my parent are paying for it now.

Again - what difference will it make, going into the Navy, whether you have your PPL or not?
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
Spaceman3750
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,641

« Reply #29 on: September 17, 2011, 03:57:35 AM »

A Q for the OP - what difference will it make, going into the Navy, whether you have your PPL or not?

Complete hearsay, but viewed from my perspective, he is saying he wants to get his PPL, through CAP as a cadet, before he turns 18- at that point he joins the Navy and is no longer a cadet (and won't have time for getting a PPL for a long time).

But I could be completely wrong here.
you are completly correct. i wont havemuch time after im 18 because of college and work. also my parent are paying for it now.

Again - what difference will it make, going into the Navy, whether you have your PPL or not?

Well, if he's applying for a rated slot at OCS, a PPL gets you points here and there.

But, that's at least 4 years away.
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The moment any commander or staff member considers themselves a gatekeeper, instead of a facilitator, they have failed at their job.
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,402
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #30 on: September 17, 2011, 05:02:20 AM »

Guys, I'm looking for an answer from the OP, not guesses from the rest of the participants. What's so hard about that?  >:(
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
a2capt
300,000th Post Author
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,095
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« Reply #31 on: September 17, 2011, 12:29:45 PM »

Guys, I'm looking for an answer from the OP, not guesses from the rest of the participants. What's so hard about that?  >:(
Then ignore them. Move along. These are not the replies you are looking for.  It's a forum. People post in forums. Same way you post your opinion on peoples threads. Same way you throw your tick-tock thing around just because you feel the thread is done, when many have outlived your opinionated clock, too.
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simon
Seasoned Member

Posts: 246

« Reply #32 on: September 19, 2011, 02:20:11 AM »

mon876, notwithstanding my earlier comment, so far I believe Eclipse listed the important points that you need to know.

1. You will need prior approval from your squadron commander. They may even wish to clear it at a higher level. Best to get everyone on board early.

2. You will need to find an qualified and current CAP CFI that is willing to take you all the way through your training for nothing. Good luck. You will need it. I don't say this in a critical way. I simply mean if you can find a CFI, you are indeed lucky.

Now, assuming you have those two things, you just need to get everything else that Eclipse pointed out. The above two will be the hardest. Oh yeah, and a plane you can use.

You are going to have to pay for the engine reserve (I don't know what this is on a Florida Wing 172. I only know it is $37 per hobbs hour on a California 182). Maybe it is $25? But you will HAVE to pay for this. Everybody does. These planes don't maintain themselves.

Then there is the gas of course.

In the end, you will probably save $30-$50 an hour over an old FBO 172. Plus you will save on flight instruction of course. Another, say, $50 an hour.

The costs are the sole benefit you will get from getting your private through CAP. And yes, those could be substantial savings. I am guessing these days it is probably $12,000 all up to get a private pilot's certificate in a 172 in 70 hours. Maybe you can do it in 60 hours. Maybe it's $10k. People argue over these things but there are lots of little extras here and there - Headset, charts, medical, DPE ride etc. $10k is a lot of money for someone under 18 (For some of us over 18 as well).

So perhaps you can reduce this by $2500 by doing it through CAP. The next biggest issue, if you can get over (1) and (2), is getting your benevolent instructor to give you lessons on your schedule. Most CFI's are not well off (Sorry guys but you know what I mean). If they get a new student, they are eager to teach. It is a living to them. If they don't fly, they aren't making money. If your CAP CFI doesn't give you a lesson after work, he gets to see his family. So if you come to a CFI at an FBO all eager to punch through your private in 4 months, most CFI's will get on board and try and help you. However, if you get a CAP CFI who works full time, most likely, he isn't going to want to spent four nights a week taking you up on lessons. He might only have time for 1 lesson a week, especially if he has other paying students outside CAP.

This also assumes that you will find a CFI that is not only available, but one you will like. This, I feel, is the biggest deal of all. A CFI in your private molds your flying, quite possibly for the rest of your flying career. The best habits are developed at the start and the worst ones either caught or missed. You want a CFI you really fit with. Not just the only one who is willing to take you on. Look carefully at their qualifications as well. How many students have they put through a private in the last 5 years? Don't sell yourself short just because someone is giving you something for nothing. Keep in mind that flying is still serious business and you want to get started on the right footing. It is almost unnatural that you need to demand a lot from your instructor but in turn, you are demanding a LOT more from them as an unpaid professional for your entire private. That's worth remembering. They are a professional, but they are not being paid.

So beware the amount of time that you are expecting your CAP CFI to donate. If it is free, it will be on his schedule, not yours. You can't 'fire' him. You'd be doing him a favor.

Then there is all the other CAP paperwork, delays, aircraft usage, down time, blah blah blah etc. If you go to a decent FBO, there will always be an aircraft available that you can schedule for a lesson. Their livelyhood depends on the aircraft being online. Not so with CAP. Repairs sometimes run with the speed of 1000 turtles. We've had a plane down for multiple weeks. That's life with CAP.

That's why I say, honestly, forget CAP to get you all the way through your private. On the face of it, the $2500 savings is significant. But depending on your instructor's availability, it might take you twice as long as you anticipated. And if you are chomping at the bit to get through it, be honest in asking yourself why the CAP route would make sense for you.

Good luck.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2011, 02:27:32 AM by simon » Logged
Thrashed
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 510

« Reply #33 on: September 19, 2011, 08:45:24 AM »

Make sure you know all the requirements for your Wing. My wing must approve all flight training (form on wing website) AND you must use the Cessna Part 141 flight training syllabus for training (that you must purchase). That includes all the stage checks with a checkpilot. I don't know of anyone in PA using CAP aircraft for flight training!  :(
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Save the triangle thingy
Stearmann4
Recruit

Posts: 20

« Reply #34 on: September 19, 2011, 08:53:11 AM »

Quote
Well, if he's applying for a rated slot at OCS, a PPL gets you points here and there.

Outstanding grades in college, PT scores, and demonstrated leadership potential will earn more favor than a PVT ticket for OCS. So many candidates I counsel/mentor want to go to flight school are under the impression that a pilot's license will help their chances. The short answer is yes, if you have advanced ratings and several hundred hours (i.e. you didn't just go get a PPL for the purpose of applying for OCS). Otherwise, take that 6-8K and go take some more/advanced college courses, whch also serves as a nice back up if OCS/flight school doesn't work out. Just my .02

MR-
« Last Edit: September 19, 2011, 10:10:31 AM by MIKE » Logged
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Aviation & Flying Activities  |  Topic: ppl instructor wanted
 


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