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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Safety  |  Topic: Are your tires safe?
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jimmydeanno
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« on: March 24, 2009, 12:51:28 PM »

I thought this topic might be appropriate, considering the switch many people will be making in the next few months (winter -> summer tires).  Also, this is the time of year that many CAP vans will be undergoing inspections and routine maintenance.

I happened to watch this 20/20 special on the dangers that aged and old tires present.  Industry experts suggest that a tire that is 6 years old or older shouldn't be used.  The age of the tire leads to drying, cracking and tread separation.

Apparently, there are many people each year killed by old tires.  The sneaky thing though is that you might buy a 'brand new' tire that was manufactured 6 years ago and not realize the risk that you just inherited. 

There is a date code at the end of the DOT numbers on your tire.  It will be the last four digits and reads like this:

5205

The first two digits are the week of the year that it was manufactured.  The second two digits are the year.  So the above number would be made sometime between December 24-31 of 2005. 

If your tire only has three numbers (422) it would be the 42nd week of 1992.

I would recommend watching this special, especially the part where they show what happens when the tread separates from a passenger vehicle.  It's about 10 minutes long and I found it to be very informative.

Drive Safe!: http://abcnews.go.com/Video/playerIndex?id=4826897
« Last Edit: March 24, 2009, 01:18:47 PM by MIKE » Report to moderator   Logged
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Rob Sherlin
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2009, 02:32:46 PM »

  It's important to check your tires anyway. I've noticed that because of where I live (Niagara Falls), the winters take toll on tires a lot more (comparing to when I lived in California) because of the salt on the roads to melt the snow (it also can wear out a pair of leather boots rather quickly).
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Rob Sherlin SM, NER-NY-116
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2009, 02:36:35 PM »

NFPA says that tires on fire apparatus need to be replaced every seven years, for this very reason. We spend big bucks replacing tires with very little wear.
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swamprat86
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2009, 02:37:40 PM »

If you have not already done so, you should forward this to National to see if they would put it in the next Sentinal.

Thanks for the info.
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jimmydeanno
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« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2009, 03:23:10 PM »

If you have not already done so, you should forward this to National to see if they would put it in the next Sentinal.

Not being an official safety officer, I'm not aware of the route to forward this.  The NHQ safety page doesn't have an obvious "Submit Sentinel Ideas Here" spot.

Anyone have a specific e-mail address or link?
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« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2009, 03:54:31 PM »

Especially if you have a plane. If the treads are a little overworn replace them, dont take any risks.
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C/TSgt W
SarDragon
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« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2009, 08:26:30 PM »

This is an age issue, not a wear issue.

I just replaced the tires on my cargo trailer for the same reason, being reluctant to deal with a flat/blowout on a 2000 mile trip with a full trailer. The tires were 16 years olde, with about 5000 miles on them. There was a little checkering on them, and possible failure at 65 mph was a consideration.
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Dave Bowles
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DavidB
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« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2010, 05:54:54 PM »

I just joined CAP talk and i thought I would put my two cents worth in on this topic.

 in 2007 we started having issues with the tires being dry rotted, the still looked good and had a lot of tread but were just to old.  In the last two years we have just about replaced all of them but some of our vehicles have not had new tires since before Katrina and the tires should be replaced about every five years because the material the tires are made from deteriorate over time.  We had one incident were the tire on an F250 that the tread separated while it was sitting in the parking lot.  The other two had tire tread separation while the vehicle was moving.

In my opinion the problem is that CAP's maintenance program dose not check to see how old a tire is just its condition and tread wear.  National HQ will replace tires when they need to be replaced but only four at a time not the spare as well.


I have discussed this with the wing CC and have a plan in place to repace all vehicle tires over the next five years.
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David P. Berteau, Lt. Col. CAP
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« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2010, 07:07:33 PM »

In my opinion the problem is that CAP's maintenance program dose not check to see how old a tire is just its condition and tread wear.  National HQ will replace tires when they need to be replaced but only four at a time not the spare as well.
Oh, they love tire preassures too.  I've seen units take vehicles to tire shops to have them properly inflated and still get dinged by CAP/CAP-USAF inspectors because they didn't match what the CAP/CAP-USAF tire gauges said...
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arajca
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Posts: 4,371

« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2010, 09:36:17 PM »

In my opinion the problem is that CAP's maintenance program dose not check to see how old a tire is just its condition and tread wear.  National HQ will replace tires when they need to be replaced but only four at a time not the spare as well.
Oh, they love tire preassures too.  I've seen units take vehicles to tire shops to have them properly inflated and still get dinged by CAP/CAP-USAF inspectors because they didn't match what the CAP/CAP-USAF tire gauges said...

Been there. Van was parked for a few hours and a professional gauge was used just before the inspection. Inspector walks up, and refuses the professional gauge and digs one out of his pocket! According to his gauge, three tires were under by 5-10 psi and one was 20 over. Go figure.

If you want to really surprise them, know what the load rating is an how to find it. Hint: on the door sticker the tire size is usually something like LT245/85R17E - the "E" is the load rating. Only load ratings higher than "D" are listed. "A", "B", and "C" are not. On the tire, it is either part of the size of is listed separately along the bead.

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Gunner C
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« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2010, 10:31:18 PM »

Frustrating, but that's just the nature of inspections.  I've had similar things happen in RM and CAP.  Just smile and give them a "we'll be sure that's taken care of."
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flyguy06
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Posts: 2,195

« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2010, 07:18:13 PM »

I thought this topic might be appropriate, considering the switch many people will be making in the next few months (winter -> summer tires).  Also, this is the time of year that many CAP vans will be undergoing inspections and routine maintenance.

I happened to watch this 20/20 special on the dangers that aged and old tires present.  Industry experts suggest that a tire that is 6 years old or older shouldn't be used.  The age of the tire leads to drying, cracking and tread separation.

Apparently, there are many people each year killed by old tires.  The sneaky thing though is that you might buy a 'brand new' tire that was manufactured 6 years ago and not realize the risk that you just inherited. 

There is a date code at the end of the DOT numbers on your tire.  It will be the last four digits and reads like this:

5205

The first two digits are the week of the year that it was manufactured.  The second two digits are the year.  So the above number would be made sometime between December 24-31 of 2005. 

If your tire only has three numbers (422) it would be the 42nd week of 1992.

I would recommend watching this special, especially the part where they show what happens when the tread separates from a passenger vehicle.  It's about 10 minutes long and I found it to be very informative.

Drive Safe!: http://abcnews.go.com/Video/playerIndex?id=4826897

I was attending an OSHA sagety course and they showed us that 20/20 special last Thursday. very interesting. I never knew that I wil definantly be checking my tires date from now on.
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