February 19, 2020, 02:30:11 pm

Health information

Started by SarDragon, September 11, 2016, 07:48:21 pm

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SarDragon

OK, we're going to give this a try.

Health items may be posted here, with the following rules:

1. Information only. No opinions, no politics. Polite discussion is encouraged.
2. If you don't like it, drive on.
3. If you disagree, or think it's incorrect, report it, and drive on. Leave the flaming in the flame locker. The mods will sort it out.

I will move older posts here as I have time.
Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret

NIN

Is there any way to request that such posts at least have a tangential relationship to CAP (apart from "this concerns humans, and humans are in CAP") in some way?

Darin Ninness, Col, CAP
Wing Dude
I like to have Difficult Adult Conversations™
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2007-2020 by NIN. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

Spam

September 11, 2016, 08:25:00 pm #2 Last Edit: September 15, 2016, 05:27:48 am by SarDragon
Requested topic for the subject matter experts to work on that could be productive and are actually really needed (this is a repeat on my part - no one answered earlier this year):


Problem:
Per CAPR 60-3 26 DECEMBER 2012, Section 1-24. Legal Issues of CAP Operational Missions, subparagraph f, First Aid and Emergency Medical Care, as excerpted below, the current Ground Team 3 rating requires "Basic First Aid class" (cross reference the GT Manual of May 04, and the GTL Reference Text of April 03, Chapters 4, 15, 20). While in the past, many such courses were of nominal cost, today most course options involve significant expense on the part of local units and may not meet regulatory requirements. Assistance is needed to sort through the mass of available courses, and research and recommend courses which meet regulatory requirements yet are low-overhead impacts for volunteer local units.


Recognizing that courses taken entirely on line are not acceptable, but that a local hands on element led by local personnel coupled with an online course could meet the requirement, could the Health Services team please research, compare, evaluate, and recommend courses which combine an affordable (preferably free) package of training that meets the standards cited in the excerpt below.


V/R
Spam


Excerpt of 60-3 provided:
"the expectation is that the qualification course includes both knowledge and practical skills training; first aid courses taken on-line only are not acceptable; though members are not considered employees when supporting operations, courses are expected to meet the National Guidelines for First Aid in Occupational Settings available at http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/24000/24700/24757/ngfatos.pdf or ASTM F 2171-02(2009), Standard Guide for Defining the Performance of First Aid Providers in Occupational Settings".


SarDragon

Quote from: RNOfficer on September 15, 2016, 03:41:29 am
We all need calcium and Vitamin D for strong bones but how much do we need and where should we get it from?

Good guidelines:

    1,000 milligrams/day for those age 19 to 50
    1,200 milligrams/day for those age 50 or over
    1,000 milligrams/day for pregnant or lactating adult women

Most people immediately think of milk as the best source of calcium. Milk is a good source however too much may lead to health problems, especially ovarian and prostate cancer. In addition whole milk has saturated fat and all milk has Vitamin A, which at high levels can, paradoxically, weaken bones. This may be the reason that some studies show increased bone fractures in those elderly who drink lots of milk.

Calcium can also be obtained from dark leafy green vegetables and some types of legumes. A variety of calcium-fortified foods, such as orange juice and soy milk, are now on the market.

The body needs Vitamin D to process calcium. Almost all milk sold in the US is fortified with this Vitamin and the body produces it from sunlight on the skin.

Note that most people in the world become lactose intolerant after infanthood. For them, eating or drinking dairy products causes problems like cramping, bloating, gas, and diarrhea. These symptoms can range from mild to severe. Certain groups are much more likely to have lactose intolerance.For example, 90 percent of Asians, 70 percent of blacks and Native Americans, and 50 percent of Hispanics are lactose intolerant, compared to only about 15 percent of people of Northern European descent. This appear to be an evolutionary adaption.

In addition, people, including people of Northern European descent, can become less lactose tolerant as they age.

One alternative for those who are lactose intolerant but who still enjoy consuming dairy products is to take a pill containing enzymes that digest milk sugar along with the dairy product, or to consume milk that has the lactase enzyme added to it. Alternatively, calcium can be obtained from non-dairy products previous noted.

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/calcium-full-story/
Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret

RNOfficer

Quote from: SarDragon on September 11, 2016, 07:48:21 pm
OK, we're going to give this a try.

Health items may be posted here, with the following rules:



I'm confused as to what "here" refers to. Is it the Safety forum or this thread?

SarDragon

This thread, with a new title on a post with new subject.

Sent from my phone.

Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret

sarmed1

Quote from: Spam on September 11, 2016, 08:25:00 pm
Requested topic for the subject matter experts to work on that could be productive and are actually really needed (this is a repeat on my part - no one answered earlier this year):


Problem:
Per CAPR 60-3 26 DECEMBER 2012, Section 1-24. Legal Issues of CAP Operational Missions, subparagraph f, First Aid and Emergency Medical Care, as excerpted below, the current Ground Team 3 rating requires "Basic First Aid class" (cross reference the GT Manual of May 04, and the GTL Reference Text of April 03, Chapters 4, 15, 20). While in the past, many such courses were of nominal cost, today most course options involve significant expense on the part of local units and may not meet regulatory requirements. Assistance is needed to sort through the mass of available courses, and research and recommend courses which meet regulatory requirements yet are low-overhead impacts for volunteer local units.


Recognizing that courses taken entirely on line are not acceptable, but that a local hands on element led by local personnel coupled with an online course could meet the requirement, could the Health Services team please research, compare, evaluate, and recommend courses which combine an affordable (preferably free) package of training that meets the standards cited in the excerpt below.


V/R
Spam


Excerpt of 60-3 provided:
"the expectation is that the qualification course includes both knowledge and practical skills training; first aid courses taken on-line only are not acceptable; though members are not considered employees when supporting operations, courses are expected to meet the National Guidelines for First Aid in Occupational Settings available at http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/24000/24700/24757/ngfatos.pdf or ASTM F 2171-02(2009), Standard Guide for Defining the Performance of First Aid Providers in Occupational Settings".


As an CAP-USAF guy, I dont know how to push this thru, but am willing to look into it.  I dont see why CAP member would/could not be eligible to not only participate in but self manage (at which ever level seems most appropriate...usually the Wing Level for USAF) for the self aid an buddy care program.   The biggest stumbling block is it involves an online program coupled with a "practical" skills session.  There is no reason the online part couldnt be migrated to e-services, all CAP members complete it and it shows the training record then the "trainer" sign off in the SQTR approval block once the practical part is completed. 

as far as the
Quoteresearch, compare, evaluate, and recommend
, I think this would be the place for a working group to start.  It is at least cost effective, and added bonus is in-line with the total force concept, though there are parts that are geared towards the deployed environment, the bulk is applicable to the everyday working environment.  Personally, short of developing something entirely owned by CAP, any other course is going to be paid for at some level by the organization/member.  (unless someone negotiates into the ARC MOU "free training")

mk
Mark Kleibscheidel
TSgt USAFR

Brad

Quote from: Spam on September 11, 2016, 08:25:00 pm
Requested topic for the subject matter experts to work on that could be productive and are actually really needed (this is a repeat on my part - no one answered earlier this year):


Problem:
Per CAPR 60-3 26 DECEMBER 2012, Section 1-24. Legal Issues of CAP Operational Missions, subparagraph f, First Aid and Emergency Medical Care, as excerpted below, the current Ground Team 3 rating requires "Basic First Aid class" (cross reference the GT Manual of May 04, and the GTL Reference Text of April 03, Chapters 4, 15, 20). While in the past, many such courses were of nominal cost, today most course options involve significant expense on the part of local units and may not meet regulatory requirements. Assistance is needed to sort through the mass of available courses, and research and recommend courses which meet regulatory requirements yet are low-overhead impacts for volunteer local units.


Recognizing that courses taken entirely on line are not acceptable, but that a local hands on element led by local personnel coupled with an online course could meet the requirement, could the Health Services team please research, compare, evaluate, and recommend courses which combine an affordable (preferably free) package of training that meets the standards cited in the excerpt below.


V/R
Spam


Excerpt of 60-3 provided:
"the expectation is that the qualification course includes both knowledge and practical skills training; first aid courses taken on-line only are not acceptable; though members are not considered employees when supporting operations, courses are expected to meet the National Guidelines for First Aid in Occupational Settings available at http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/24000/24700/24757/ngfatos.pdf or ASTM F 2171-02(2009), Standard Guide for Defining the Performance of First Aid Providers in Occupational Settings".


Try this as a starting point: http://cpr.heart.org/AHAECC/CPRAndECC/Training/HeartsaverCourses/HeartsaverFirstAidCPRAED/UCM_473177_Heartsaver-First-Aid-CPR-AED.jsp

(or without the CPR & AED): http://cpr.heart.org/AHAECC/CPRAndECC/Training/HeartsaverCourses/HeartsaverFirstAid/UCM_476846_Heartsaver-First-Aid.jsp
Brad Lee
Maj, CAP
Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff, Communications
Mid-Atlantic Region
K4RMN

Spam

September 18, 2016, 04:04:22 am #8 Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 09:31:41 pm by SarDragon
Thanks, Brad. I do appreciate your interest in the topic. I actually took this course a few years ago (not bad).

On the positive side:  this is a first data point. I would love to see our "Health Services Officer" community take this topic and run with it, spending their apparent available energy to do a comparative study between options out there, to include paid courses like this, as well as perhaps an off the shelf CBT plus a local skills test, or even a CAP developed LMS module plus a "check ride" skills test administered at Wing level (or something like that).

On the not so positive side, commercial courses like this one (which runs at 75 bucks per head) are certainly not "of nominal cost", as I'd phrased it... I'd love to see our HSO experts out there do the research and make considered recommendations of sets of options for us to consider, with costs/benefits/strengths and weaknesses of each option.

Can Do, you HSOs out there?


V/R
Spam



Brad

September 19, 2016, 03:31:19 am #9 Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 04:30:38 am by SarDragon
I remember years ago my Squadron arranged for that course for free. Complete classroom first aid and CPR + AED with our county EMS. I would suggest that as a starting point, as they likely have instructors on staff, or can at least help liaison with surrounding larger counties to get things going at the local level.
Brad Lee
Maj, CAP
Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff, Communications
Mid-Atlantic Region
K4RMN

Eclipse

September 19, 2016, 04:16:25 am #10 Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 04:31:23 am by SarDragon
Quote from: Brad on September 19, 2016, 03:31:19 am
Complete classroom first aid and CPR + AED with our county EMS.


Then they almost certainly violated their provider agreement.

That's the issue with the instructors who can provide training that meets CAP mandate, they
aren't allowed to offer the training for free.  At a minimum they have to purchase the books, etc.,
and register the participants with the provider.

BTDT in a circle, for a decade.



AirAux

September 19, 2016, 03:57:28 pm #11 Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 05:59:49 pm by SarDragon
Problem is, most instructors do it for a living.

On the other hand, if you are lactose intolerant, you can drink raw milk and it won't bother you.  Pasteurization cooks the lactase enzyme out of the milk causing some people to have a hard time digesting milk, AKA, Lactose Intolerance..  (Lactose is the sugar in milk)

Eclipse

September 19, 2016, 04:02:55 pm #12 Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 06:00:06 pm by SarDragon
Quote from: AirAux on September 19, 2016, 03:57:28 pm
Problem is, most instructors do it for a living.


It's certainly part of the challenge.

I received several classes from a member who was an AHA instructor.  He could give his time away free, but
participates still had to pay for the materials.  If he just taught the class on his own, there was no
back from AHA and he could get kicked as an instructor. 

Same goes for ARC, Green Cross, or any of the other for-profit schools.  Without the backing of the
teaching organizaiton, you might as well get it from the local FD (which IMHO, we should be able to).




RNOfficer

Quote from: Spam on September 11, 2016, 08:25:00 pm

Recognizing that courses taken entirely on line are not acceptable, but that a local hands on element led by local personnel coupled with an online course could meet the requirement, could the Health Services team please research, compare, evaluate, and recommend courses which combine an affordable (preferably free) package of training that meets the standards cited in the excerpt below.



I agree with other posters that the ARC First Aid course is too superficial to be of much use.You might consider an "Emergency Medical Responder" course

from Wikipedia

The U.S. Department of Transportation (D.O.T.) recognized a gap between the typical eight hours training required for providing advanced first aid (as taught by the Red Cross) and the 180 hours typical of an EMT-Basic program. Also, some rural communities could not afford the comprehensive training and highly experienced instructors required for a full EMT-Basic course. The First Responder training program began in 1979 as an outgrowth of the "Crash Injury Management" course.

In 1995 the D.O.T. issued a manual for an intermediate level of training called "First Responder." This training can be completed in twenty-four to sixty hours.

Importantly, this training can be conducted by an EMT-Basic with some field experience


The certification "First Responder" has been largely replaced by "Emergency Medical Responder"

http://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/preview-kits/emergency-medical-response

http://www.nsc.org/learn/Safety-Training/Pages/Courses/emergency-medical-response.aspx

https://www.nremt.org/nremt/about/reg_1st_history.asp

RNOfficer

September 20, 2016, 11:40:50 pm #15 Last Edit: September 20, 2016, 11:46:35 pm by RNOfficer
http://kvktech.com/LomairaPressRelease.pdf

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/expert-answers/phentermine/faq-20057940

This is a drug for short term (maximum 12 weeks) but even small weight loss can improve health.

The new low dose (but taken several times a day) may mitigate some of the side effects which include

    Increased blood pressure
    Dizziness
    Dry mouth
    Sleeplessness
    Nervousness
    Constipation

Phentermine isn't a good option if you have heart disease, high blood pressure, an overactive thyroid gland or glaucoma. It also isn't for women who are pregnant, may become pregnant or are breast-feeding.

A better alternative is life-style and diet changes. The American Heart Association has a new, easy-to-follow plan, "Life's Simple 7"

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/My-Life-Check---Lifes-Simple-7_UCM_471453_Article.jsp#.V-HJtjU83tR

etodd

This is going to be a wild thread. Many different topics in a single thread where replies and comments get jumbled amongst all the others. Once it gets to a few pages, it'll be next to impossible to read a singular topic and its replies(?)
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

Майор Хаткевич


etodd

Quote from: Капитан Хаткевич on September 21, 2016, 11:09:08 pm
That's why quoting exists.


Yes. But when someone a few weeks from now replies to a post on page 3 and the reply goes on page 27 .... and they only quote a snippet ...
MS - MO - AP - MP - FRO - ESO

sUAS MP - sUAS Instructor - sUAS Check Pilot

SarDragon

Hey, we can do what we need to make it work, or we can just whine about it, and get it shut off. The admins have allowed what we have. There will not be a separate forum/topic/section for this, so it's as good as it gets.

There are two ways to post to this:

Quote a post with the desired title, delete what you don't need, add your material, and select Post.

or

Start a new post, and change the title as appropriate, add your material, and select Post.

I've been reviewing posts, and changing titles, but I don't always have the time to do this.

Ball's in y'all's court.
Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret