CAP Talk

Operations => Tall Tales => Topic started by: Kal on March 27, 2008, 08:24:31 PM

Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Kal on March 27, 2008, 08:24:31 PM
Ok, everyone share some stories from encampment. War stories, something amusing, or something you thought was odd or interesting. I'll start off with a short one.

Last day of encampment, and everyone is tired, especially the staff.  At the normal time we got up (5? I don't know, none of us had watches) we were all laying in bed awake, waiting for our Flight Sergeant to start the morning ritual of PT, drill, etc.  The trumpet goes off in the distance, and we are still waiting for the Flight Sergeant to come out.  After a while, our First Sergeant comes out in his pajamas. He mumbles,

"Ok, guys, time to get up." Then he stumbles back over to his bed, and everyone can hear him flop back down to go to sleep.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: DC on March 27, 2008, 08:46:51 PM
It was, I think, the third night of the '05 SER Winter Encampment. I was on CQ, the first shift, right after lights out. I'm patrolling down the hall way when my flight commander and another Flight Commander in my squadron come out of the showers with towels around thier waists. There is also assorted cadet staff and my partner in the hall too. Suddenly about half way down the hall they drop their towels and calmly proceed the rest of the way down the hall to the Cadet Officer's room. It was pretty funny after encampment, but it seemed pretty messed up then..

There was also the time that my flight commander tossed an apple core into some bushes while we were drilling. My Flight Sergeant starts tearing into him about not littering. After the good Sgt ran out of breath my flight commander calmly pointed out that apples are fruit, and therefore totally, rapidly biodegradable...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Kal on March 27, 2008, 09:47:40 PM
That's amazing.  :D  Here's another:

At a Army Ranger/Sniper demonstration, a group of people volunteered, including me. Best volunteer I ever made. They gave everyone a rifle, or in my case an M249 SAW, with blanks, and let everyone who volunteered shoot off some ammo. I had fun blasting away at invisible enemies, and stood up after my belt was gone. I looked over at another guy who had an M249 SAW.  He was firing a couple bursts.  Now this is one of those seemingly three feet tall, twenty pound guys (huge exaggeration, but you get the point. He was really small). He finally decided to let loose.  While wasting the belt, everyone watched as he was pushed back five feet. He finally stood up with a big grin on his face, covered in dirt.  Probably the coolest thing I have ever seen happen while someone shot a gun.

Also at the demonstration, "terrorists" drove up and kidnapped a cadet colonel. She was so scared, it was amazing. Of course, as the terrorists drove away, another sniper team moved in, took out some of the stragglers, while a Ranger detachment disabbled the SUV with two HMMWVs with Brownings and an M240B.

The coolest introduction was also at that demonstration. We marched out into nowhere, going "where are our instructers?" we marched past one, and stopped two feet in front of one. Both were hiding in the grass with their gillie suits on. One of the snipers was our TAC officer.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: nesagsar on March 27, 2008, 11:52:54 PM
At my second encampment our squadron all qualified on the Air Force range with M-16a2's. I was one of only 4 to score in the Expert range. Unfortunatly due to CAP regs I couldent wear the ribbon.

At my last Wing encampment I served with the Comm/Sec Flight. One day I was sitting in quarters watching cable just after my shift and the cadet commander walks by with a basic cadet. The cadet see's me (I was a 16 year old cadet at the time) and asks the commander why I get to watch TV. CC yooks down and  says" He's more important than you are, get moving". Turns out the basic cadet had been "killed" on road guard duty.

The next day I got to confiscate the cadet first sergeants radio for improper use and banned her from speaking on the encampment net.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Kal on March 28, 2008, 05:59:45 PM
One guy I knew was kind of strange, but a nice guy once you got to know him. Just to be completely random, he brought his "Hawaiian Witch Doctor" mask. One of the guys there had a surefire G2, and so they hid in one of the tents.  When one of our sergeants would go in to get something from their gear, he would rise up slowly and dance around grunting while someone strobed with the surefire.  It was amusing and kinda strange. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ♠SARKID♠ on March 29, 2008, 04:52:50 AM
My flight had the worst military bearing when I went to encampment.  It wasn't necessarily because we were poorly trained/undisciplined, it was because of our flight sergeant.  He wasn't exactly the "yelling" type, so every single time he got loud his voice would crack like a pubescent teen.  Hear that hundreds of times in a week, and you're bound to let loose a few chuckles.

Oh yeah, a kid in another flight got duct taped to a wall.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: nesagsar on March 29, 2008, 09:35:51 AM
I remember a encampment flight sergeant that caught everyones attention with his boots. The dumb kid brought Clorfam combat boots. We never did find out how he got them or why he brought them to encampment but he caught **** for it all weekend.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: DC on March 29, 2008, 04:55:58 PM
I remember a encampment flight sergeant that caught everyones attention with his boots. The dumb kid brought Clorfam combat boots. We never did find out how he got them or why he brought them to encampment but he caught **** for it all weekend.
I would be afraid to wear those...

My flight was also short on discipline. We had maybe four or five cadets that I would consider 'good'. We had this one 12 year old that make techno noises while we were in formation, this huge kid that had some serious anger problems (he threw a cadet across the room because he got ticked off for no apparent reason).

And our Flight Sgt. Oh my. On our first night while we were squaring away our wall lockers he storms into our room tells us they are wrong (we had them organized exactly like out OIs said) and proceded to tear everything out of them and spread it all over the room. He also yelled at us so much (and usually for no apparent reason) that he totally lost his voice by day four. He was all hoarse for the rest of the week.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: _ on March 29, 2008, 06:48:59 PM
And our Flight Sgt. Oh my. On our first night while we were squaring away our wall lockers he storms into our room tells us they are wrong (we had them organized exactly like out OIs said) and proceded to tear everything out of them and spread it all over the room. He also yelled at us so much (and usually for no apparent reason) that he totally lost his voice by day four. He was all hoarse for the rest of the week.
Sounds like someone used Full Metal Jacket as a study guide
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: mikeylikey on March 29, 2008, 07:09:13 PM
The first Encampment I went to as a Cadet I was roomed with a guy who would sleepwalk.  The second to last night, he gets out of bed, and decides to go for a walk.  He walked right past the "fire guard" (who apparently was asleep) and walked about 1/4 mile into an Army cantonment.  He was brought back by the MP's and we all were waken up and forced to go outside to get "lectured" too about looking out for each other. 

The last ENC I went to as a Cadet we had an AF Major bring weapons and vehicles and ammo  from Aberdeen Proving Grounds and Bolling AFB.  HE was the Encampment Training Officer and I was on the cadet training staff that year. The third to last day, the FBI comes and wakes me and my roomates up looking for this Major.  As it turned out he was not an AF Major, but "played one on tv" (as in he pretended to be an Officer).  So I along with like 12 others were questioned by the FBI, and we got to watch as he was taken away by the FBI, the Army and AF special investigation folks.  We later read he spent 6 months in Federal Prison.  (This happened pre 9-11, I am sure his jail time would have been more like 30 years if he were to do that today). 

On the Senior Member side, I had one cadet steal a van, one cadet get caught in a "compromising postion" with another cadet of the opposite sex, and one cadet arrested for shoplifting from the PX (I think he took a Coca-Cola and some Cd's). 

Other than those instances, Encampments have been rather boring! 

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: nesagsar on March 29, 2008, 10:27:03 PM
How about stealing a belt of ammunition off of an Air Force firing range and showing it off at the squadron office when you get home.

Or how about a senior member droping a loaded and ready M9 during a live fire demonstration in front of cadets.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: mikeylikey on March 29, 2008, 10:44:37 PM
How about stealing a belt of ammunition off of an Air Force firing range and showing it off at the squadron office when you get home.

That would be one for the Air Force OSI to investigate and prosecute.  I see 4 possible criminal (felony) charges with that, the least of which would be theft of government property. In todays world, things like that are taken seriously, and usually end up with some jail time.

This really didn't happen did it?  (Don't answer that question, it may actually drag you into the case).
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: nesagsar on March 29, 2008, 11:02:53 PM
I saw some pretty messed up stuff in my time with CAP. My rank issues, the confusion about my ribbons and badges, my difficulties with cadet protection policies, I knew of a person that was rumored to provide sexual favors at CAP functions, etc...

A lot of the people on this board dont belive me when I mention some of the smaller problems we had, it has to have been a localized thing because from what I see on this board your units and commands dont have these problems.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: mikeylikey on March 29, 2008, 11:32:57 PM
A lot of the people on this board dint believe me when I mention some of the smaller problems we had, it has to have been a localized thing because from what I see on this board your units and commands dint have these problems.

Oh it happens everywhere.  Some are better at sweeping it under the rug than others, and still a few are able to get rid of the problem people in one big swoop.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: nesagsar on March 29, 2008, 11:54:02 PM
If they could get rid of the problem people I would join up again in a flash. Too bad I would have to be a senior member though, less fun.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: jimmydeanno on April 02, 2008, 01:01:14 AM
...Too bad I would have to be a senior member though, less fun.

from someone who has never been a senior member...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: nesagsar on April 02, 2008, 01:13:58 AM
...Too bad I would have to be a senior member though, less fun.

from someone who has never been a senior member...

From the advice of my father who was a cadet in the 70's and a senior member in the 80's-90's.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on April 02, 2008, 02:27:17 AM
You, and all others of your ilk, can read and listen to others all you want, but if you ain't "been there, done that", you really got nothing to say.

I have many life experiences in many areas, but I am always willing to defer to those with a higher BTDT score in a particular area.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Grumpy on April 02, 2008, 02:43:44 PM
You, and all others of your ilk, can read and listen to others all you want, but if you ain't "been there, done that", you really got nothing to say.

I have many life experiences in many areas, but I am always willing to defer to those with a higher BTDT score in a particular area.

You old f---, at your age you should have many life experiences.   ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on April 02, 2008, 08:38:28 PM
Thank you, Grump. Did you have to get up from your nap early for that?  ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SSgt Rudin on May 22, 2008, 01:01:28 AM
First encampment circa winter 1998 Homestead ARB - fire drill right in the middle of shower/personal time, next year the ops order was very specific on the types of underwear permitted and required a bathrobe or "beach towel" and the fire drill was moved to a different time.
During contraband check a cadet had fireworks confiscated from him, he said they were for New Years.
I also learned at that encampment that while I was able to deal with blues shoes that were a little too small for 2 hours once a month, I was unable to deal with it at encampment. Didn't help that I had 4 ingrown toenails.

Summer 2003, Camp Blanding FL - not really funny, but over 20 cadets completely ignored the bold "drink plenty of water prior to arrival" in the ops order and passed out during in processing. Black flag conditions all 9 days of encampment.

SER winter encampment 07 - in the middle of a staff meeting the entire staff was mobilized to search for a missing flight sergeant, he was latter found in his bed, asleep "mummified" in his blankets.
This was also the encampment that I learned it can get down to single digits in FL. Nothing like running around to all the barracks at 2am with space heaters waking up and moving around cadets. I was waking this one cadet to move him from his bed to a different one so we could but a space heater there, he would not wake up for anything, including picking the bed frame an inch off the ground an dropping it, so I started snapping about 2 inches from his head. He finally woke up and went "duuuuddddeeee what the fuc... yes sir?" Another one wouldn't wake up and we still had 4 buildings to put heaters in so we got six people and picked up his entire bed and moved him, he woke up mid move, it was priceless.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: jimmydeanno on May 22, 2008, 07:48:50 AM
First encampment circa winter 1998 Homestead ARB - fire drill right in the middle of shower/personal time, next year the ops order was very specific on the types of underwear permitted and required a bathrobe or "beach towel" and the fire drill was moved to a different time.

1998, Westover AFB, MA.  Fire drill.  It was my first encampment - I was the Charlie Flight Sergeant.  The end of the night I went to take my shower.  Right in the middle of it the fire drill commences.  I gave my report, shampoo still in, holding my towel up with my left hand...I completely understand.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: JoeTomasone on May 22, 2008, 12:17:07 PM

1983 or so, Plattsburgh AFB.   Survival training in a remote area of the base.   We are told to build shelters, and are given specific instruction not to approach nor build our shelters too close to a building a little outside the clearing we were using -- the Weapons Storage Area.    I wound up with a migraine that night and was sitting up in mid-suffer with the Senior staff when some SPs came by -- a little concerned that one group was a wee bit too close to the WSA.   They decided to teach them a lesson in the morning, and so reveille consisted of that group being surrounded by 5 or 6 SPs with pointed (but unloaded, I was told) weapons and commanded to exit their shelter IMMEDIATELY.   The looks on their faces as they came out and saw themselves at the business end was priceless, as was their faces 5 seconds later when they were asked why they were so close to the WSA - which was a Federal felony, etc, etc, etc...   They got the expected "DO NOT DO IT AGAIN" command and probably time to go change undergarments.

On CQ, I caught the Flight Commander (a real jerk, incidentally) and a female cadet mid-liplock.   Funny, I never got any crap from him after that night.......

We had one screwup from our Squadron who attended - a female cadet who spent most of her free time periods marching off demerits (can they even do that anymore, or does that tug at the CPPT heartstrings?).  We had an O'Grady Says competition the second-to-last day of Encampment which I won.   As they announced me the winner, she screams, "YAY, TOMASONE" (or similar, I don't recall now).  BAM - demerit for fraternization.    :D

Our rooms were along a standard hallway but there was one room at the end whose door was perpendicular to the hallway - so if you walked all the way down the hallway you'd wind up going through that door and into the room, facing the end of one double-decker bunk.   There was a chin-up rod on each door frame, and one of the things cadets liked to do was run down that hallway, jump, grab that bar, and swing.    So one day, that room has an unexpected room inspection.  Four cadets at attention next to their bunks, officers inspecting, when suddenly a cadet "goes for the bar" -- but he loses his grip on the bar, lands on his back, and slides completely under the bunk..   Priceless.

This wasn't at encampment, but during a Group trip to Washington, D.C.   We were staying in some armory in standard double bunks.  One barracks building for male cadets, and one for females, separated by a small grassy area.   It was somewhat after lights out when all of a sudden the male Senior Members come in yelling, "WHO WANTS MILK AND COOKIES??".   

Silence. 

"WHO WANTS MILK AND COOKIES??".

Silence.

"WHOOO WANNNTS MILLLK ANNND COOOOOKIES??!!!?!?!?!?!?!?!".

One cadet says, "Me, sir!"

Without a word they ran to his bunk, removed his blanket, rolled it up, laid it across his belly/waist, lifted his entire mattress up, and carried him out to that grassy area, where they folded the ends of the blanket under the mattress so he was essentially pinned there, albeit weakly, and ran off, leaving him there.   Of course, the commotion woke the females, who gathered at the window to watch as the cadet freed himself (in his underwear) and went back to the building.

Oh, the lovely days before CPPT when you didn't really have to worry about being immediately 2B'd... </sarcasm>

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: capchiro on May 22, 2008, 12:56:00 PM
Not real exciting, but just for a point of perspective.  Era 1963 or 1964, Chanute AFB, summer encampment.  I think the encampments were for 10 days or something.  Anyhow, we flew down from Wisconsin in a C-119.  While there we got to fly in a C-47 and I actually got about 10 minutes hands on experience.  That thing should have had power steering.  Worse than driving a truck.  We went to a lot of classes and observed a test jet engine firing on the pad.   Food was great (I think).  We stayed in open bay barracks, but no bunk beds.  We had wall lockers and foot lockers.  Off hours we were taken to the base pool.  We built camp fires and sat around singing.  One of the older cadets brought his guitar.  I learned "lemon tree" and "Cumbayah" along with "If I had a Hammer".  I guess we sang those songs about a hundred times.  We must have had some peaceniks in the group.  We did PT and ran.  We went to classes with the Air Force guys (that was pretty cool).  The only bad thing was there was a little guy that was a real whiner (and no, it wasn't me).  Anyhow, mid-encampment, a couple of the jocks (again, not me) drug him into the bathroom and smeared his private parts with some Red Hot Balm.  It only got worse when he started crying and smeared it in his eyes.  The Air Force medics took him away and we never saw him again.  I can't remember what happened to the jocks, but I think they may have gone away also.  This was a good lesson for me to learn.  When I was on active duty, I stayed in the center of the pack, never outstanding and never on the bottom.  Invisibility is always a good policy in herd mentality.  Anyhow, I hope I didn't bore anyone to tears.  Perhaps, my encampment was when National began thinking about cadet abuse??       
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Sleepwalker on May 23, 2008, 12:24:39 PM
I have served on staff (as a TAC "Senile Member") for many Encampments at several different Wings.

I have seen many funny things such as:

 

List Fixed - MIKE      
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Taber4 on June 15, 2008, 07:22:12 PM
I was woken up early at the usual time at five o'clock.  I scrambled out into the hall and stood at attention quickly but still drowsy from sleep.  For about 10 minutes they had us stand there because some cadets were late and had to practice getting into the hall over again.  I wasn't really paying attention to myself, I just wanted to start my legs moving.  All of a sudden without warning I got lightheaded and passed out.  I was standing across from the bathroom which had a swinging door.  I went into the bathroom and pushed the door wide open, slamming my head on the tile.  The door closed onto my hand and it got caught underneath.  I think the pain woke me up but I was so out of it I just stood up and walked into the bathroom and took a piss in the urinal.  My flight sergeant came over and asked me what the h*** just happened.  I zipped up my pants and took a walk down to medical and that was that.  At least I got out of the morning PT :)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SWASH on November 22, 2008, 09:08:52 PM
SER winter encampment 07 - in the middle of a staff meeting the entire staff was mobilized to search for a missing flight sergeant, he was latter found in his bed, asleep "mummified" in his blankets.
This was also the encampment that I learned it can get down to single digits in FL. Nothing like running around to all the barracks at 2am with space heaters waking up and moving around cadets. I was waking this one cadet to move him from his bed to a different one so we could but a space heater there, he would not wake up for anything, including picking the bed frame an inch off the ground an dropping it, so I started snapping about 2 inches from his head. He finally woke up and went "duuuuddddeeee what the fuc... yes sir?" Another one wouldn't wake up and we still had 4 buildings to put heaters in so we got six people and picked up his entire bed and moved him, he woke up mid move, it was priceless.

I remember that.  I was a flight sergeant and we had to take all of our cadets outside to get head counts.  We then preceded to get into mass huddles (like the ones male penguiens use during the winter).

It was terribley cold that encampment.  I ended up wearing all of of BDU shirts, long sleeve under armor, and every gloove and face warmer that was left over from handing them out to cadets.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on November 23, 2008, 03:54:11 PM
In the early 80's Volk ANGB, WI had a beer vending machine in the encampment area beside Bldg. 117.

The KC-97 on static display could be gotten into and was a prime make out spot. Also, under the F-102s when they were over by the base chapel instead of in front of the headquarters building.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Chicago_Pilot on March 08, 2009, 11:17:48 PM
This thread is pretty funny.  I am signed up for my first encampment (TAC Officer) this Spring.  I certainly hope I don't run into some of these situations!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TEAM SURGE on March 08, 2009, 11:42:07 PM
That's amazing.  :D  Here's another:

At a Army Ranger/Sniper demonstration, a group of people volunteered, including me. Best volunteer I ever made. They gave everyone a rifle, or in my case an M249 SAW, with blanks, and let everyone who volunteered shoot off some ammo. I had fun blasting away at invisible enemies, and stood up after my belt was gone. I looked over at another guy who had an M249 SAW.  He was firing a couple bursts.  Now this is one of those seemingly three feet tall, twenty pound guys (huge exaggeration, but you get the point. He was really small). He finally decided to let loose.  While wasting the belt, everyone watched as he was pushed back five feet. He finally stood up with a big grin on his face, covered in dirt.  Probably the coolest thing I have ever seen happen while someone shot a gun.

Also at the demonstration, "terrorists" drove up and kidnapped a cadet colonel. She was so scared, it was amazing. Of course, as the terrorists drove away, another sniper team moved in, took out some of the stragglers, while a Ranger detachment disabbled the SUV with two HMMWVs with Brownings and an M240B.

The coolest introduction was also at that demonstration. We marched out into nowhere, going "where are our instructers?" we marched past one, and stopped two feet in front of one. Both were hiding in the grass with their gillie suits on. One of the snipers was our TAC officer.

Where was this? I believe I was there!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on March 09, 2009, 12:07:34 AM
This thread is pretty funny.  I am signed up for my first encampment (TAC Officer) this Spring.  I certainly hope I don't run into some of these situations!

Now that you've read this, the RST on Saturday will probably make a lot more sense.   :o
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Chicago_Pilot on March 09, 2009, 12:13:11 AM
Now that you've read this, the RST on Saturday will probably make a lot more sense.   :o

Good guess!  I'm hoping for some amazing training.  So don't let me down.   :)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Mullins on May 31, 2009, 09:07:34 PM
This didn't happen to me, but a friend of mine was in charge of dealing with all the contraband the cadets had.  So he is sorting through the stuff, when he comes across a single Xbox 360 controller.  I guess some one else was going to bring the TV but forgot :D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: notaNCO forever on May 31, 2009, 09:10:08 PM
 I remember one year helping with a contraband check and finding one cadet with a ton of individual tobasco sauce packets. I guess he was worried about poorly flavored food.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Polecat on May 31, 2009, 10:45:52 PM
At my basic encampment everyone was out in formation after chow waiting on some cadets to finish in the bathroom, and my battle buddy was one of those.  So my flight sgt. sends me to check on him cause by now he was the last one in there, and aparently my battle buddy thought it would be funny to make grunting noises.  I go back to the formation and tell my flight sgt. what the deal was so we wait some more, then my flight sgt. goes in to tell him to hurry up and comes back trying not to laugh.  Then my flight commander comes and the coversation goes like this:
Flight CC: "What's taking so long?"
Flight Sgt.: "He's grunting one out, Chief"
Flight CC: "Tell him to hurry up"
So my flight sgt. opens the door and yells: "Push man, PUSH!
Then all two squadrons bust up laughing and my first sgt. walks up and starts to chew us out for laughing at attention and gets mad at my flight CC who is dying laughing, and he tells her what happened and she busted out laughing too.

That was probably my favorite memory from encampment.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: CAPC/officer125 on June 07, 2009, 12:45:23 AM
One of my best encampment stories would have to be at Joint '08. We were about 3/4 the way through the week and all the staff were zombies. Well our command chief, while fighting to keep her voice, called the first stretch of the day for PT. Much to the surprise of all the basics and most of the staff, it was "The go back to bed stretch". Needless to say, the basics and about 1/2 the staff got an extra hour of sleep to start the day off. (For some it was really needed)
Also at this encampment, I had a cadet pretty much drink Listerine straight from the bottle(the big bottle). Now this cadet was like 4'10" or so, and was already suffering from a rash in an uncomfortable place that messed up the way he marched. So now you add drunkenness to the weeble wobble factor and you can pretty much figure out his nickname for the week. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: BrandonKea on June 07, 2009, 02:36:24 AM
Also at this encampment, I had a cadet pretty much drink Listerine straight from the bottle(the big bottle). Now this cadet was like 4'10" or so, and was already suffering from a rash in an uncomfortable place that messed up the way he marched. So now you add drunkenness to the weeble wobble factor and you can pretty much figure out his nickname for the week.

Why, oh why, would anyone do that ever?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SJFedor on June 07, 2009, 08:01:51 AM
Also at this encampment, I had a cadet pretty much drink Listerine straight from the bottle(the big bottle). Now this cadet was like 4'10" or so, and was already suffering from a rash in an uncomfortable place that messed up the way he marched. So now you add drunkenness to the weeble wobble factor and you can pretty much figure out his nickname for the week.

Why, oh why, would anyone do that ever?

It's something we actually see pretty regularly in the ER. Bottles of mouthwash (the dollar store brands, mind you) have enough alcohol to get you tipsy pretty cheap. For example, the following picture is an actual picture taken in one of our trauma bays of the interesting collection a patient had on their person:

(http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/blogs/trauma/files/2009/03/dsc02675.jpg)

Note that along with the "40" and the vodka, there's a bottle of listerine. However, along with the alcohol in there (approximately 54 proof), there's some other things that really just aren't good for you to be ingesting.

But, why a cadet would be doing something like that, I can't even begin to imagine.

And, as an aside, is this something that is addressed in the DDR program?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Gunner C on June 07, 2009, 01:26:42 PM
I've never heard anything.  You'd think something like that would have been passed up the chain to be addressed.

Quote
Also at this encampment, I had a cadet pretty much drink Listerine straight from the bottle(the big bottle). Now this cadet was like 4'10" or so, and was already suffering from a rash in an uncomfortable place that messed up the way he marched. So now you add drunkenness to the weeble wobble factor and you can pretty much figure out his nickname for the week.

That kid had a real problem that needed to be addressed with the parental units immediately.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: BrandonKea on June 07, 2009, 04:40:35 PM
And, as an aside, is this something that is addressed in the DDR program?

I doubt it. And could you imagine cadets telling their parents "we learned in CAP you can get loaded from a bottle of Listerine!"

I've heard of people doing the Listerine thing before, and even straining Sterno through cheese cloth to get that alcohol. I have personally witnessed a person drink an entire bottle of Robitussin as well, that was pleasant...

I think DDR should be highlighting the dangers of ILLEGAL drugs (I realized alcohol is illegal until a certain age, but the focus should perhaps be on Marijuana, a drug which according to a CDC survey in 2001, 42.4% of students surveyed have tried.) Talk about the dangers of ABUSING alcohol, and drinking and driving. But at the same time, don't glorify drinking as some "Rite of Passage" that once you hit college, you've gotta be doing to fit in. That's a sure ticket for a youthful abuser of alcohol.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spike on June 07, 2009, 04:49:21 PM
Note that along with the "40" and the vodka, there's a bottle of Listerine. However, along with the alcohol in there (approximately 54 proof), there's some other things that really just aren't good for you to be ingesting.

I believe what you are saying, but if you look closely the Listerine bottle is unopened while the others have already been opened.  Perhaps the Listerine was a legitimate item, not intended to be consumed??

I always told my cadets that if they wanted to bring mouthwash along at a CAP activity, it had to say "Alcohol Free" on the bottle, and be unopened upon arrival.  Then I would get the question "That is unfair....why do I have to buy a new bottle"?  My response...."because others can not be trusted".

I remember back in Junior and Senior High school, Colgate, Crest, and a bunch of other manufacturers would supply free items (to include mouthwash) to students in a bag (Direct Marketing at its finest!).  Some of the kids would gather up the mouthwash items and drink them.  Eventually after a kid got sick the School board agreed to stop handing out the mouthwash in the packages.

Anyway....you would be surprised at what contains alcohol these days.     
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spike on June 07, 2009, 04:56:13 PM
....But at the same time, don't glorify drinking as some "Rite of Passage" that once you hit college, you've gotta be doing to fit in. That's a sure ticket for a youthful abuser of alcohol.

But don't pretend it does not exist, or make it out to be the "big evil" that we see certain groups doing.  MADD is a perfect example.  They get funding by scaring society into believing that Alcohol is the most evil and dangerous thing on the planet.  More people are killed every year by non DUI/DWI accidents that those caused by intoxicated individuals.  Biggest cause of accidents in 2008......falling asleep/ being too tired to drive.  Why are there no campaigns against the dangers of driving when too tired??

Not educating children on responsible drinking is just as bad as letting them drink at 14.  BECAUSE when the kid becomes old enough to drink, he or she has no idea how to do it responsibly.

Makes you wonder how the United States survived before there were drinking laws...huh??

Society did not fall apart before 1924 when drinking laws were invented. 

Don't forget that many parts of the world, drinking is accepted at even younger ages.   

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SJFedor on June 07, 2009, 09:45:19 PM
And, as an aside, is this something that is addressed in the DDR program?

I doubt it. And could you imagine cadets telling their parents "we learned in CAP you can get loaded from a bottle of Listerine!"

I'm not saying "tell them you can get hammered off of this stuff" but rather highlight the added dangers of attempting to do so. I'd think a bottle of listerine might be easier to get a hold of then a bottle of liquor for a  teenager, and addressing it and further highlighting the dangers of consuming it (ulcers, stomach/intestinal damage, not to mention the flatulence and diarhea from drinking it) would be of benefit. In middle school, I sometimes overheard friends talking about how they got "loaded" off a bottle of listerine/scope, followed by about how sick they got and how bad their head hurt the next day.

Note that along with the "40" and the vodka, there's a bottle of Listerine. However, along with the alcohol in there (approximately 54 proof), there's some other things that really just aren't good for you to be ingesting.

I believe what you are saying, but if you look closely the Listerine bottle is unopened while the others have already been opened.  Perhaps the Listerine was a legitimate item, not intended to be consumed??

Patients that consume mouthwash as a substitute to just buying alcohol have a distinct odor, both from their breath and from their pores. I could smell this dude had been drinking it before I even entered the room. It's possible he just hadn't gotten to it yet because he still had his handle of vodka and his 40 to finish first.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AndrewA74 on July 07, 2009, 02:09:05 AM
To get this topic back in line, I just finished my first encampment two weeks ago, and after we got up around 0500 we had to go to the head (by flight), so we were in the head, and the Cadet Commander walks in, and someone shouts, "ROOM TEN-HUT!". The Cadet Commander looks down and says, "THIS IS A BATHROOM! ARE YOU KIDDING ME?" and stomps out. And then, on another day, we had to get up 'quietly' because a Marine was sleeping in the same barracks with us, and he was still sleeping, so we had to be really quiet in getting up and motivating.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: JCJ on September 07, 2009, 11:15:44 AM
Cadet encampment - a male cadet is caught texting on cell phone (contraband).  A review of the text messages on the confiscated phone reveals:

"I love u ur so hot Jenny" (name changed to protect the guilty)

Review of the cadet roster reveals that there indeed is a cadet Jenny (last name) at encampment.  She is summoned to the command post:

Encampment Director of Cadet Training:  "Cadet, what is the cadet honor code?"

Cadet Jenny:  "Sir we will not lie, cheat, steal nor tolerate those who do sir!"

Encampment Director of Cadet Training:  "Cadet, do you have a cell phone?"

Cadet Jenny:  "uh, uh, uh, ..."

I think they both marched off some tours & got to finish.  But it was hilarious.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: coolkites on September 07, 2009, 10:15:24 PM
wow I can imagine being embarrassed  as heck.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on September 07, 2009, 10:24:11 PM
Cadet encampment - a male cadet is caught texting on cell phone (contraband).  A review of the text messages on the confiscated phone reveals:

"I love u ur so hot Jenny" (name changed to protect the guilty)

Review of the cadet roster reveals that there indeed is a cadet Jenny (last name) at encampment.  She is summoned to the command post:

Encampment Director of Cadet Training:  "Cadet, what is the cadet honor code?"

Cadet Jenny:  "Sir we will not lie, cheat, steal nor tolerate those who do sir!"

Encampment Director of Cadet Training:  "Cadet, do you have a cell phone?"

Cadet Jenny:  "uh, uh, uh, ..."

I think they both marched off some tours & got to finish.  But it was hilarious.

And the Senior who did their contraband check should have been out there with them!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Ned on September 08, 2009, 12:23:01 AM
Cadet encampment - a male cadet is caught texting on cell phone (contraband).  A review of the text messages on the confiscated phone reveals:(. . . )

Not to be too much of a wet blanket here, but it is normally a crime to intercept anyone's phone conversations and text messages without permission.

It's one thing to collect a cadet's cell phone in accordance with published rules that forbid cell phones for cadets at a CAP activity, but it's quite another thing to go into the phone and read private messages between the cadet and a third party.

I doubt anyone is going to jail under these circumstances, but you've pretty well solved the problem when you collected the phone for safekeeping.  So why press your luck and pry into another person's personal and private information?

Ned Lee
Former Legal Officer
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Fifinella on September 08, 2009, 02:23:25 AM
Not meaning to derail this thread, but it is not appropriate to use the honor code to enforce regulations, i.e., to force someone to self-incriminate.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on September 10, 2009, 06:28:07 PM
Cadet encampment - a male cadet is caught texting on cell phone (contraband).  A review of the text messages on the confiscated phone reveals:

"I love u ur so hot Jenny" (name changed to protect the guilty)

Review of the cadet roster reveals that there indeed is a cadet Jenny (last name) at encampment.  She is summoned to the command post:

Encampment Director of Cadet Training:  "Cadet, what is the cadet honor code?"

Cadet Jenny:  "Sir we will not lie, cheat, steal nor tolerate those who do sir!"

Encampment Director of Cadet Training:  "Cadet, do you have a cell phone?"

Cadet Jenny:  "uh, uh, uh, ..."

I think they both marched off some tours & got to finish.  But it was hilarious.

And the Senior who did their contraband check should have been out there with them!

We don't do pat downs or strip searches at inprocessing so unless it's bigger than a bread box a cadet can sneak any pocket size item of contraband in. However, the greatest majority do voluntarily surrender those items.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/MSgt Lunsford on October 18, 2009, 02:58:20 PM
I have a few:

About 2 or 3 nights into our Encampment (WV Wing Encampment at Camp Dawson - Kingswood, WV) I and a fellow Cadet from Foxtrot was on CQ patrolling our bunker, Full Metal Jacket Style. Anyway, we came across one of the Restrooms and went inside. There we found a red light coming from one of the Stalls. Heres the Horrible Disgusting part. It was an C/Amn doing some "Jurking Off". Yes, disgusting, I know. But we "Coughed" our presence and he got himself back to his bunk.

Next one was about 4 days into our "Fun filled" week. We had just got back from Chow and we were heading back to the Firing Range to shoot some .22's. All of a sudden we were visited by 2 V22 Ospreys and they landed on the Runway. After we got to take a look at them, they did some exciting High Speed Fly By's.

That was my first Encampment, very exciting one. Always a good experience. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Cadet Dan on October 18, 2009, 03:52:18 PM
Here's a few from my most recent encampment.
So I am walking with the First Sergeant to chow along with several other staff members, and a group of 2 ga's walks by us. They both salute the First Sergeant and greet her with a " Good afternoon ma'am " She stops spins around and holds up her insignia and says " Im not an Officer! I work for a living!!" we got a few laughs out of that one.

Im sure this has happened to everyone at least once on staff. A group of staff members are resting in the lounge and the majority of them have drifted off to sleep. A flight commander walks in, and in reaction the one person awake yells " room tench hut! " Everyone hastily wakes up and comes to attention, disoriented and confused.

As one of the only ways staff could get their sanity back once the GA's had gone to bed was to play cards. So after the fifth day we all agreed to joke around. We dicided to ( 100% jokingly ) play strip poker. Which was not even so. We layed out our covers, strew shoes and socks around and the like. But when a Senior Member walked down the hallway we all hastily cleaned up. So for the rest of encampment whenever we passed eachother we would say " uh oh...shes taking her cover off..." " there goes the Curry ribbon..." ( please remember that this was in a 100% joking fasion and no such actual activity occoured )
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Chief2009 on October 18, 2009, 06:49:47 PM
My last encampment I was cadet support staff. We had two day rooms in two different barrak at Volk Field, Admin was above Comm was on the bottom. There was a planter with a bench on it in between the two levels. If you were coming out of Admin and someone was sitting on the bench, you couldn't see them until you were right there.

Anyway, I was coming out of Admin and saw the Deputy Commandant of Cadets standing by the door to Comm. I go down the stairs, salute her, and go into Comm. Then I hear "Chief, get back here!" I turn around and there is the Commandant of Cadets, a Major and the Wing Deputy Commander, a Lt Col!

So she starts chewing me out, the Maj and the Col are both silent until she asks me why I didn't salute the Col. I replied truthfully, "I didn't see him, ma'am." At this the Maj starts laughing at me and the Col gets a huge smile on his face. The Col interrupts the the Deputy Commandant saying it was okay, "I had my cloaking device on." Once again the Major starts laughing and I had to bite my lip to keep from laughing. I was dismissed and went back to my job.

This became a running joke between the Lt. Col and I. He was on my review board for NBB and right after I reported to the board he asked me "Can you see me now?" Later I got a letter from him, it was a blank sheet of paper with the exception of a little handwriting: "Hope you like this autographed picture!"

If I've guessed right, Eclipse might have been present when this occurred.

DN
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on October 18, 2009, 07:48:49 PM
No. That was Redfox24(the Major) and the (at the time) Wing CV still wears a camo T-shirt to the senior cookout that says, "Can you see me now?"
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Chief2009 on October 18, 2009, 08:59:34 PM
Thanks for the clarification!

DN
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: JoeTomasone on October 19, 2009, 04:54:21 AM
Then I hear "Chief, get back here!"

So she starts chewing me out, the Maj and the Col are both silent until she asks me why I didn't salute the Col.



Being the smart-butt that I can be, I would have countered with, "Why did you address me as Chief?"   >:D


(CAPP 151 requires SMs to address Cadets as "Cadet".)

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on October 19, 2009, 09:57:28 PM
He wanted to continue living. You have to know her to understand.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on October 20, 2009, 10:28:33 AM
My second to last encampment there was a funny situation with some goldbond. I'm pretty sure Eclipse would hunt me down and tear my head off if I retold the story. Although the Senior staff did go on a roll with the jokes right afterward.

A few that I can tell:

This was in '07, and my C/XO and a support staffer were working on a class. the C/XO tried to find an image to add to a powerpoint, but "salude.jpg" wasn't it. It was however, an in-your-face young female model holding a glass of champagne with her thong cover ass cheeks. For the rest of encampment whenever we would pass the support staffer or each other we would say salude and start cracking up. This also teaches you to take your own laptop not your fathers to encampment.

Another incident was at the SAMT facility, and the instructor having just returned from Iraq. During his lesson on the M-16 things like this were heard:
"Johnny Jihad", "What makes the grass grow? Blood Blood Blood", "Aghhhhh!", "What is the buttstock used for? Bashing Brains, Petty Officer!". Again, in his defense, he just came back from a tour of duty.

One year a flight seemed to have the most injury prone cadets. I believe it was alpha flight, and they went from 12-14 cadets down to 6 or 7. Almost all of the 'injuries' came from this one flight.

In 06, a Senior who had around 15 encampments under his belt as a cadet and a senior showed the executive staff how to tape down bunks with duct-tape to make them indestructible. Having done this to all executive bunks, someone had a bright idea of showcasing these bunks to two Navy Recruit Division Commanders. Upon first look they were quite impressed at the quality of the bunk, but when one of the RDCs tried moving the blanket to look at the sheet, the whole getup - mattress included lifted from the bed. Expecting to be struck down by lighting at this point, both surprised us by laughing and saying that while its something they haven't seen before and think is a 'good' idea, they wouldn't let their recruits get away with it.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: RicL on October 31, 2009, 12:50:12 AM
Oh, I've seen some real *facepalm* scenarios at the two encampments that I served as senior staff for. Actually, all of these happened at the same encampment.

1) Coming out of the medical office (as med oic) and finding a cadet sitting on the wood steps (that were built during vietnam) with a can of shoe polish blazing away with flames licking the railing. Cadet saw nothing wrong with the fact that he (a) had a lighter with which to light the shoe polish (b) was very close to burning down my med office (c) was in blues with patent leather shoes that didn't require polishing to begin with.

2) Having a cadet (who also happened to be AFJROTC) purchase a miltary smoke grenade from an active duty enlisted USAF member that was tasked with driving bus for us. Ended up getting 2b'ed on the spot, escorted from base by MP's who made him wait at the gate for his parents and also followed up with a call to his AFJROTC chain of command. The icing on the cake was that he had attempted to buy a fragmentation grenade but the enlisted USAF member "didn't have any".

3) Having one of the only two working inbound/outbound telephones at the encampment, sitting at your desk in the medical office and getting a call from the wing alerting officer inquiring as to whether we have sufficient staffing for an ELT activation mission. Gee, I hope so.. We've been training GTM, GTL, MRO, and a myriad of other qual's for days now, have close to 100 SM's and 380 cadets on base.. and getting the response "Oh, the encampment's going on isn't it".
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: JoeTomasone on October 31, 2009, 01:06:13 AM
2) Having a cadet (who also happened to be AFJROTC) purchase a miltary smoke grenade from an active duty enlisted USAF member that was tasked with driving bus for us. Ended up getting 2b'ed on the spot,

What happened to the USAF guy who sold it?????

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: High Speed Low Drag on October 31, 2009, 03:26:00 PM
My first encampment was in 1983 at Grand Forks AFB; I was a very scared 12-yoa C/Amn.   :o   Remember, these were back in the days that you could be dropped for push-ups.  We had about 200 cadets and had to march about a 1.5 miles to chow everyday.  One of the funniest things I remember was that I was walking down the hall towards the bathroom when I saw the C/CC (a full Spaatz) headed for me in a hurry.  I hit the wall so hard that my head bounced off of it and then I hit the ground.  The colonel stopped and squatted beside me to see if I was OK.  I was still so scared of him that I tried to go to ATTENTION while I was lying on the ground.  He had to order me to relax and told me that I wasn’t in trouble, he was just concerned.
It was that day that I learned that he was human too.  The rest of the encampment was a lot more fun.  We flew on a KC-135 over the Artic Circle on an overnight mission and a Huey (SAR bird). 

A lot of NCSAs and encampments later, I was the C/CC of an encampment when I had a basic trip and fall trying to get out of my way.  Remembering my own experience, I helped that cadet to his feet.   After a 20 + year hiatus from CAP, I went to an encampment as a TAC this year.  To me it looked like the cadets were not having as near as much fun as we had WIWAC.  I just hope that they got some good stories from the encampment. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: RicL on October 31, 2009, 03:43:18 PM
What happened to the USAF guy who sold it?????

I honestly don't know. All I know is that he was removed as our bus driver and dragged away by the MP's. His final disposition was up to them. I'm sure he didn't remain in the military as he had very little rank left for them to take, but that's conjecture.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on October 31, 2009, 05:36:25 PM
My first encampment was in 1983 at Grand Forks AFB; I was a very scared 12-yoa C/Amn.   :o   Remember, these were back in the days that you could be dropped for push-ups.  We had about 200 cadets and had to march about a 1.5 miles to chow everyday.  One of the funniest things I remember was that I was walking down the hall towards the bathroom when I saw the C/CC (a full Spaatz) headed for me in a hurry.  I hit the wall so hard that my head bounced off of it and then I hit the ground.  The colonel stopped and squatted beside me to see if I was OK.  I was still so scared of him that I tried to go to ATTENTION while I was lying on the ground.  He had to order me to relax and told me that I wasn’t in trouble, he was just concerned.
It was that day that I learned that he was human too.  The rest of the encampment was a lot more fun.  We flew on a KC-135 over the Artic Circle on an overnight mission and a Huey (SAR bird). 

A lot of NCSAs and encampments later, I was the C/CC of an encampment when I had a basic trip and fall trying to get out of my way.  Remembering my own experience, I helped that cadet to his feet.   After a 20 + year hiatus from CAP, I went to an encampment as a TAC this year.  To me it looked like the cadets were not having as near as much fun as we had WIWAC.  I just hope that they got some good stories from the encampment.


You couldn't be dropped for push-ups even in 1983. But some traditions die very, very slowly.

Heck, the Air Force couldn't drop me for push-ups in Basic Training when I went through Lackland in Sept-Oct 1974.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on October 31, 2009, 09:39:01 PM
In NJ Wing, you weren't supposed to be dropped for pushups even as far back as 1964. Nome of the NoJer folks weren't very compliant with that prohibition, but us folks in SoJer sure complied.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/MSgt Lunsford on December 20, 2009, 09:45:39 PM
This was last years Encampment (West Virginia Wing Encampment 2009)

I'll let the video do the talking. Hooah.

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=136094263168&subj=1514811734 (http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=136094263168&subj=1514811734)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on December 20, 2009, 11:05:09 PM
Requires login.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/MSgt Lunsford on December 20, 2009, 11:08:43 PM
Requires login.
Ok. Let me work on it. Here, you can see it on my profile... Hopefully.
http://www.facebook.com/GoCAP.MER.WV.020.CadetLunsford
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on December 20, 2009, 11:15:46 PM
Requires login.

Not everyone does Facebook.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/MSgt Lunsford on December 20, 2009, 11:17:07 PM
Requires login.

Not everyone does Facebook.
Thing is, it is only on Facebook. I'll see if I can get it on a video hosting website, it is pretty funny.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on December 20, 2009, 11:22:41 PM
Requires login.

Not everyone does Facebook.
Thing is, it is only on Facebook. I'll see if I can get it on a video hosting website, it is pretty funny.

I wouldn't suggest posting a video you don't own on public sites, especially if its "funny".
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: jimmydeanno on December 21, 2009, 01:16:28 AM
(http://dansideas.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/wet-blanket.jpg?w=627&h=480)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on December 21, 2009, 01:19:53 AM
(http://dansideas.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/wet-blanket.jpg?w=627&h=480)

Thank you!  Thank You!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: jimmydeanno on December 21, 2009, 01:25:15 AM
 ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Dracosbane on December 21, 2009, 03:41:43 AM
Here are a few encampment stories I can tell.  There are a lot that I won't.

Encampment no. 1, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, AL:  Flight commander is named Pyle.  Cadet staff decide that he's Gomer Pyle, not of Andy Griffith fame, but FMJ fame.  One afternoon, they swiped a jelly donut from the mess and brought it to his room and placed it into his locker.  Que FMJ "jelly donut" scene.  Being a raw C/Amn I'd never heard of FMJ.  The part where Gunny calls for the payment of the jelly donut, the staff calls for everyone on the floor to drop.  In blues.  They immediately sent someone in to the other rooms to correct this.  Funny now. 

I bunked with the only Spaatz cadet at the encampment.  He wasn't staff, he just was there.  He had a lovely collection of vitamins he was taking in his locker.  During another inspection, the staff were warned that it was his locker.  They commented about all the bottles.  When we told him that they'd taken a peek, he started leaving vitamins out for the staff to take during the inspections.  Several did.

Got to see the ISS before it was launched into orbit.  Had a tornado rip through the base in the middle of the week. 

Encampment no. 2  Smyrna TN:  Got to watch 84 Charlie MoPic one afternoon.  Got to shoot AR-15s at the range.  Someone ended up shooting a table while clearing a jammed round.  Had some cadets in my flight from the same home squadron tell us that during fire watch one night that week, they saw the ghost of a cadet from their squadron who'd recently committed suicide appear.  He was scheduled to attend that encampment.   One male, one female, two separate barracks, two separate fire watch shifts. 

The cadet PAO spent an hour having a conversation with a canteen, alone.  How do I know?  He video taped it.

Encampment no 3 Camp Atterbury, IN:  Ended up being OotD by default for most of the week, because the command staff didn't rotate the position.  Our bivouac was "assaulted" by some Army guys bivouacing across the street.  Would have been better if they hadn't launched flares over the camp site and hadn't stopped well short of the tents. 

Somehow, the subject of dog biscuits came up during chow one day.  The TAC officer in charge of the mess was actually an Army CSM, and coincidentally one of my boss' bosses in my civilian job.  He decided the next day as a joke to bring in a box of Milkbone.  By the third day of this, there were cadets voluntarily eating the biscuits.

During my inprocessing, I was informed that the room I was staying in was for myself and my flight sgt.  I quickly had to remind my C/CC that unless the rules and regs about fraternization had changed, my female flight sgt. would probably be better staying in her room in the female barracks.  I had a room to myself that week.  Because of this, I got to implement the "house mouse/house rat" position in my flight.  I needed a senior male airman to act as my assistant when my sgt. was unavailable.  Glorified gophers, they were.

I'm looking forward to attending as a TAC officer at some point. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: pthorburn42@gmail.com on February 15, 2010, 02:56:23 PM
Well the last time i went i had to flights under me and i was the 1st squadron 1st shirt! and throughout the week the squaron commander worked with one flight i worked with the other and in the end my flight that i had been working with BRavo flight got honor flight. Then about a month later we had National Honor Guard Acadmey. Same thing there we took honor flight our first year there `08`.



C/Chief Thorburn
First Sergeant
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Rotorhead on February 23, 2010, 11:10:25 AM
Then I hear "Chief, get back here!"

So she starts chewing me out, the Maj and the Col are both silent until she asks me why I didn't salute the Col.



Being the smart-butt that I can be, I would have countered with, "Why did you address me as Chief?"   >:D


(CAPP 151 requires SMs to address Cadets as "Cadet".)

Nope,

It says, "Senior members may address cadets by grade or simply by the noble title, 'cadet.'"
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Irishrenegade on February 23, 2010, 04:23:47 PM
After reading some of these (some i was laughing pretty hard others i was rolling my eyes) I can't wait to go to an encampment haha
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: JoeTomasone on February 23, 2010, 07:04:47 PM
Then I hear "Chief, get back here!"

So she starts chewing me out, the Maj and the Col are both silent until she asks me why I didn't salute the Col.



Being the smart-butt that I can be, I would have countered with, "Why did you address me as Chief?"   >:D


(CAPP 151 requires SMs to address Cadets as "Cadet".)

Nope,

It says, "Senior members may address cadets by grade or simply by the noble title, 'cadet.'"


I stand corrected; I was looking at the old CAPP 151 which stated "NOTE Cadets are addressed as `Cadet` by CAP senior members, USAF officers, and enlisted personnel. Within the cadet structure, cadets will address other cadets by the appropriate term."

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Kerrbie on March 25, 2010, 07:48:57 PM
Hahaha encampment stories. I have a good one from my basic.

Basic Encampment, Tri-Wing Encampment(MD, DE, Nat Cap, Camp Frettered, 2005

Our flight commander was actutally an ex cadet and now was in the navy. The Whole week shes wearing her navy uniforms. She also brought both her whites, tans, and blacks so she didn't have a cap blues uniform and had to put one together for our end of the week banqute. She's running down the barreckks cussing cause she has to wear the blues. xD

My second story from Basic comes from the end of the week last morning. We all donate white blues shirts until we have 3. We write all over them notes and what not like students do at school end of the year. So in pairs of two were each deployed to the boys barrecks before wake up. So it's this other flight member and myself run over to the squadron that we competed with the most during that week, We open the door forcfully and of course the cq sees us. We throw the shirt in and scream "GOOD MORNING BOYS" and run back. It was soo funny >< I have a million more stories from basic and my 3 years on staff haha. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on March 25, 2010, 07:53:55 PM
Our flight commander was actutally an ex cadet and now was in the navy.

How is an "ex-cadet" in ranks?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Kerrbie on March 25, 2010, 07:57:11 PM
haha well Im not really sure I think she was a former cadet and they really needed her to take on a staff position. I know now though she deffiently isn't a member any more.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: NBB0058 on April 09, 2010, 12:40:38 PM
oh dear, these are great :)
but i have a question for everyone here, have you EVER had a firedrill? AT ENCAMPMENT?
HAVE YOU VER BEEN A MEMEBER OF THE "ADVANCED TRAINING SQUADRON" THE SQUADRON THAT GOT REFIGERATORS AND FOOD AND LATE BED TIMES AND KNEW EXACTLY WHEN THE FIREDRILL WAS GOING TO BE????

Well in case you haven't, lets indulge... :)
so one night, about half way throught the encampment, (when we of ATS knew there was going to be a firedrill), a cadet 2nd LT (affectionatly referred to as BLT) was attending a refrigerator full of dr. pepper, cake, and whatver else had been confiscated from the vending machines while on guard duty, DUM DA DUM, the firedrill happened, all hell breaks loose, metal garbage cans being banged thrashed down the halls, people with bullhorns on the stairs, jsut a mad house, anyways, the entire regions worth of cadets are standing outside the "burning" building in formation, (all except for ATS flight, whom was huddled around a small trash fire conviently placed for use in this tale) when the head count began,(individual squadron commanders were responsible) as such we get dowwn to the numbers, and we realise we are 2 short, mumblings began throughout the ranks of the "highly trained" ATS, as we realised the first of the cadets missing was an injured cadet we realised was with the medic, no biggie, then we realised the second missing man was our dearly beloved garcia,straight from the great lake ocochobee, garcia stood aboout 6 feet tall  wheighing in at around 200 pounds, garcia was a big man, but a gentle man, with one problem, a small bladder control problem that is the punchline of this tale, you see, when garcia had to go, garcia HAD to go, but other than BLT and garcias roomate lopez, no one knew of this, so being the last 2 men to see garcia before the building was "engulfed in flames" we started proclaiming loudly that "oh my dear lord garcia is still taking a s***, that poor SOB is still taking a s***, oh whoa to garcia whos flame was extinguised while dropping a dueceoh lord have mercy upon our souls!"we of course had to proclaim this JUST loud enough for the multiple squadrons around us to over hear and they all began questioning the statements, but right when this tale seems to be at its end, a miracle of light shione through "the flames" as garcia comes bumbling out of the "engulfed" building, sprinting full tilt, trying to yank his BDU trousers up his legs, while tossing topilet paper into the receptacle outside the door screaming "im ok guys im ok! it was just montezumas revenge!" now for the more interesting part, the  "latrine" he was using was on the third floor, and these were no regular floors, these were fort benning floors, (i.e. one floor of fort benning equals 2.75 floors of anormal office building) and as such we realised gharcia had jetted down these 1800 stairs in under thirty seconds while still cleaning himself and attempting to re-attach his pants. the moral of the story? never eat the clam chowder, the moral of the moral, BLT enjoyed a box of twinkies with his comrades that evening  while some poor shmuks from bravo  flight cleansed the latrine from "garcias last stand" lol
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on April 09, 2010, 12:53:38 PM
Punctuation is acceptable here.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: NBB0058 on April 09, 2010, 12:57:41 PM
Quote from: AndrewA74
so we were in the head, and the Cadet Commander walks in, and someone shouts, "ROOM TEN-HUT!". The Cadet Commander looks down and says, "THIS IS A BATHROOM! ARE YOU KIDDING ME?" and stomps out.


ahh, i remember the latrine becoming silent except for the one bloke that couldnt decide if it was more important to come to attention or finish his business, so he climbed ontop of the toilet so his legs couldnt be seen LOL
i alsoremeber the time half of our flight was in the bathroom, "doing business" "number 2" and all of a sudden, we all realised we were singing the same jodie so we all started blaring out in unison "I WEAR MY PINK PAJAMAS IN THE SUMMER WHEN ITS HOT!" as trhe session drew to a close with a symphony of flushes, we exited the restroom, trying as hard as we could to not make eye contact and look as innocent as possible as we realised the cadet colonel was in the stall smack in the center of our musical, as he finished washing his hands and glaring at all of us standing at attention behind him, he turns around and goes " AND THE SECOND VERSE! I WEAR MY FLANNEL NIGHTY IN THE SUMMER WHEN ITS NOT!" and strides out of the restroom, knowing full well that not a single cadet in the restroom had dry panmts and realising as well, that there was no way we could ever hope to stand at attention in front of him on graduation day whithout crying :)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: High Speed Low Drag on April 09, 2010, 01:31:26 PM
Punctuation is acceptable here.

Whats that
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on April 09, 2010, 01:47:07 PM
Punctuation is acceptable here.

Whats that

You're not helping.  :(
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Rotorhead on April 10, 2010, 07:16:45 PM
oh dear, these are great :)
but i have a question for everyone here, have you EVER had a firedrill? AT ENCAMPMENT?
Yes. Every year. And it is a surprise. I thought everyone did this.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/MSgt Lunsford on April 10, 2010, 08:36:06 PM
oh dear, these are great :)
but i have a question for everyone here, have you EVER had a firedrill? AT ENCAMPMENT?
Yes. Every year. And it is a surprise. I thought everyone did this.
Everyone does do it that I am aware of.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: davidsinn on April 11, 2010, 11:04:48 AM
oh dear, these are great :)
but i have a question for everyone here, have you EVER had a firedrill? AT ENCAMPMENT?
Yes. Every year. And it is a surprise. I thought everyone did this.
Everyone does do it that I am aware of.

I went to one last year that did not have one at the request of the host facility as there were sleeping trainees nearby.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on April 11, 2010, 02:21:12 PM
I went to one last year that did not have one at the request of the host facility as there were sleeping trainees nearby.

Did you at least do a "walk through" Fire Drill during the day so everybody knew where the exits were?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: davidsinn on April 11, 2010, 03:46:36 PM
I went to one last year that did not have one at the request of the host facility as there were sleeping trainees nearby.

Did you at least do a "walk through" Fire Drill during the day so everybody knew where the exits were?
Yes we did.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: NBB0058 on April 11, 2010, 10:15:47 PM
oh dear, these are great :)
but i have a question for everyone here, have you EVER had a firedrill? AT ENCAMPMENT?
Yes. Every year. And it is a surprise. I thought everyone did this.
Everyone does do it that I am aware of.


guys, it was sarcasm, no offense, if you read the rest of the story, you should have realized that
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Dracosbane on April 12, 2010, 12:14:59 AM
I believe that was the point, young padowan.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: V. Basile on April 13, 2010, 06:42:46 PM
I think my favorite Encampment story was when we were preparing for our white glove and we were cleaning the showers. Well being short/small and all, they needed to clean the walls of the shower. Well being in a female flight, they needed the smallest person to hoist up there to clean the showers. Well, I think the rest is self-explainable :P
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: JayT on April 14, 2010, 12:30:15 AM
I think my favorite Encampment story was when we were preparing for our white glove and we were cleaning the showers. Well being short/small and all, they needed to clean the walls of the shower. Well being in a female flight, they needed the smallest person to hoist up there to clean the showers. Well, I think the rest is self-explainable :P

What, dare I ask, is a 'white glove?'
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on April 14, 2010, 12:31:00 AM
Does it involve a cough?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on April 14, 2010, 01:58:24 AM
Does it involve a cough?

Only if they find too much dust.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on April 14, 2010, 10:01:33 AM
Ewwww...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on April 14, 2010, 11:08:00 AM



... the inspector drags the preverbal white glove over the surface and if it stays clean, you pass. ;-)
[/size](http://www.texascadet.org/news/stories/2007/200711/lackland/_08_PA281627.jpg)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/MSgt Lunsford on April 18, 2010, 02:06:16 PM
oh dear, these are great :)
but i have a question for everyone here, have you EVER had a firedrill? AT ENCAMPMENT?
Yes. Every year. And it is a surprise. I thought everyone did this.
Everyone does do it that I am aware of.


guys, it was sarcasm, no offense, if you read the rest of the story, you should have realized that

Sorry... I am not prone to Sarcasm.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: NBB0058 on April 18, 2010, 11:41:46 PM
^ its ok, i did not mean to lash out at you, other people on here et under your nerves just because they can, so i thought you were one of them  ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on April 19, 2010, 12:07:29 AM
NBB0058, one thing you will learn very quickly here on the Internets.
Emotions, especially sarcasm, are pretty hard to communicate.
Hence the labels some people use. [sarcasm] [/sarcasm]
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on May 09, 2010, 07:00:56 PM
 FL winter encampment 09-10, in my barracks tent (14-16 doolies, one staff) on new years eve, we didnt hear the retreat go off on the loudspeaker, and we stayed up till around midnight partying around. of course we didnt know we werent supposed to be doing that, but noone came in to see what was going on :-[ ::). we still had to wake up at 5AM though. :-[
same encampment, the barracks tents we were aggigned to had heating units behind them, and ours kept breaking in the midle of the night and kept blowing cold air on us. not fun in below freezing temp :-\.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on May 09, 2010, 11:43:47 PM
It gets below freezing in FL?!?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on May 10, 2010, 12:27:12 AM
It gets below freezing in FL?!?

It gets cold enough to be able to walk in the morning onto "crunchy grass".
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on May 10, 2010, 01:40:29 AM
I lived in Miami until 1980..

I recall a few mornings with crunchy grass, and frosty cars, and a slab of ice on the bicycle seat before I went to school..

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=6057042n - CBS News

http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-380384 - Frozen oranges in St. John.

http://farmlandforecast.colvin-co.com/2010/01/22/picture-of-the-week-frozen-oranges-in-florida.aspx

These are from this last Winter, too.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on May 10, 2010, 02:19:46 AM
That's Miami. I lived in Jacksonville, about 10 hours north.

I think I scraped more pre-dawn ice there, on a per year basis, than I have here in San Diego. Certainly the higher humidity was a contributing factor.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spike on May 11, 2010, 09:33:40 PM
^ San Diego has the best weather in all of the United States, so says the "polls"!!

Plus it is a nice City. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on May 11, 2010, 10:01:49 PM
It gets below freezing in FL?!?
/quote

Yeah, we had a freak cold front, and needless to say, we were pretty much freezing all day.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Grumpy on May 12, 2010, 11:02:33 AM
^ San Diego has the best weather in all of the United States, so says the "polls"!!

Plus it is a nice City.

For a sanctuary city.  Got illegals?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on May 12, 2010, 12:16:24 PM
Geez, Grump, now I've got tea in my sinuses.

Happy now???
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Grumpy on May 12, 2010, 12:48:16 PM
 :clap: :clap: :clap:
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Survivor on May 12, 2010, 11:28:55 PM
Heres one. At our encampment, on the day Michael Jackson died, some guys came running down the barracks screaming "Michael jackson is dead, Michael Jackson is dead!". We all got a kick out of it.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: DakRadz on June 14, 2010, 05:22:32 PM
Okay, so my memory is from JROTC, Navy style. It's just too good to *not* post, I realize after writing  ;D

I promise to post an encampment story before school starts back up.
Here How It Works
At the camp, the returning cadets (CAP= cadet staff) are called GAs- Graduate Assistants.

Now, GAs have been through it all, cadet-wise. Basic Leadership Training (encampment as a doolie) and Leadership Academy (COS)- so they go as basic cadets to both, just to have a leadership position their last high school summer.
As you can imagine, these cadets feel they have some privileges- electronics of all sorts, contraband candy, and they don't particularly follow rules about the tidiness of rooms.

Get Ready
Our E-7 retired Chief decides that he'll mess with the cadets, and proceeds to toss any room, of any platoon (even if they weren't his, I mean), so long as the room is untidy. Chief could trash a room, trust me. Well, not me, but the ones whose rooms he did toss, I witnessed after the fact.

Get Set!
After concluding the required daily tasks per regs, we returned to our rooms to find what Chief had done. Mine was untouched, but due to a fluke I had a six person suite to myself- wasn't hard to keep it up. Cots were in showers, blankets were soaked and placed in freezers, and general mayhem with beds pulled apart and piled on the floor.

The best part? The GAs received the EXACT same treatment- Chief had gone through the upstairs and tossed bunks, piled contraband, and made the assistants realize that not everyone felt the same concerning their "privileges."

Sounds like a lesson in leadership, right?

Except... One mistake was made that day.

Oh!....
While tossing the rooms, Chief had gotten a little lost (or so I would suppose), and trashed a room which he would have done well to never look into.

An E-9. Master Chief. Who was a rival Instructor of another platoon.

Now, our Chief would NEVER do this on purpose. Through bad luck and coincidence, an instructor was roomed unusually close to cadets, and as our beloved DI was making his "rounds" he stumbled into a hornet's nest.

This spread through the ranks, of course. We would have realized anyway when Chief called "Attention on deck!" for another enlisted man. We competed hard against Bravo* and Charlie platoons, but gave every courtesy to that Master Chief- otherwise our DI would have taken care of the problem.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Fly Boy on June 17, 2010, 12:49:16 PM
This story isn't very funny but i think it is very interesting.

My doolie encampment (2009 FLWG Summer Encampment) I was 3rd squad leader and it just so happend that the squad leaders from Hotel flight (my flight) were all next to eachother in the barracks. So one night during "free time" i was polishing my boots to a mirror shine when one cadet said that I looked like Forrest Gump shining his boots. The name stuck. And I outshined my Flight Sgt. and Commander  ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on June 17, 2010, 09:32:37 PM
This story isn't very funny but i think it is very interesting.

My doolie encampment (2009 FLWG Summer Encampment) I was 3rd squad leader and it just so happend that the squad leaders from Hotel flight (my flight) were all next to eachother in the barracks. So one night during "free time" i was polishing my boots to a mirror shine when one cadet said that I looked like Forrest Gump shining his boots. The name stuck. And I outshined my Flight Sgt. and Commander  ;D

RUN FORREST RUUUUUUUUUUNNNNNNNNNNNNN!!!!!!1!!!!!!!!!!!!11 ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: pbcheez on June 23, 2010, 12:40:28 AM
my best buddy was nicknamed the "Dungeon Master" for organizing a game of Dungeons and Dragons in the day room back in BMT. they quiz you regularly on the paygrades and rank isignias and they would always call him over and ask:
"Trainee, what is the paygrade of a Dungeon Master?"
"Sir, Trainee Gonzo reports as ordered. There is no paygrade for the rank of Dungeon Master, it does not exist!"
"Correct!, give me 50 pushups!"

they did this atleast once every day. they messed with him to the point where whenever they called him over he just automatically get on his face and they would just wait a bit and tell him to go away lol. this guy was a skinny nerdy type in the beginning and at the end wound up doing 80somting pushups on his PT-test. ::)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: StarFirePigeon on July 04, 2010, 12:18:07 PM
   GAWG Encampment '10  My room mates and me made grilled cheese and hot cocoa w/ irons
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: DakRadz on July 04, 2010, 12:20:26 PM
   GAWG Encampment '10  My room mates and me made grilled cheese and hot cocoa w/ irons

Oh goodness, I know your name. Well, I know the name of everyone in room 216.

GO DELTA!

Honor Cadet, GAWG Encampment 2010
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 04, 2010, 12:50:40 PM
   GAWG Encampment '10  My room mates and me made grilled cheese and hot cocoa w/ irons
Oh lawdy.. I guess you have to have been there to believe it! ;)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 04, 2010, 12:51:10 PM
   GAWG Encampment '10  My room mates and me made grilled cheese and hot cocoa w/ irons

Oh goodness, I know your name. Well, I know the name of everyone in room 216.

GO DELTA!

Honor Cadet, GAWG Encampment 2010
Congrats on the Honor Cadet award!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: DakRadz on July 04, 2010, 01:35:42 PM
So I promised to share a story from encampment, in return for telling one about NJROTC.


We were not given any criteria sheets on how Honor Cadet was selected, but this is my understanding- any GAWG staff who were at encampment, you may correct me. I base this on the criteria I viewed on my certificate and the individual (non team/flight) activities I remember.

Honor Cadet is really only a competition between 7 cadets- the 150 dooleys were split into seven flights (Alpha-Golf). If you didn't receive a nomination from your Flt/CC and Flt/Sgt, you couldn't run for Honor Cadet. You also had to take a PT and academics test- I believe the personal inspection counted as well (I was inspected by a SPAATZ! Pretty cool).

So of the twenty plus cadets per flight, one cadet was nominated. Seven competitors for HC based on their abilities in normal performance, plus impressing the flight staff enough to be viewed as a good candidate for the title.

I had two competitors I was worried might receive the nomination- one was an extremely motivated cadet who showed his motivation through sheer volume- it only got worse once the staff explained diaphragm use.  :o Well, he wasn't so great at drill- he admitted this himself, but they made him guidon. He really did fairly decent, but one night he forgot the guidon completely- left it in the barracks. I think that was the main reason he didn't get the Flt/CC's support.

The only other cadet would probably have Honor Cadet without any tie, period. I really believe that. She was an exceptionally smart person, JROTC, good people skills, and not one of those who try to talk- she proved it by doing.
A little info, flashback if you will
My flight was seriously the worst one at encampment- immaturity was the motto, apparently. We had to get another Flt/CC because our first was injured during Ultimate Frisbee. That created it's own problems, on top of the Flt/Sgt being a bit immature. Lots of factors which normally wouldn't occur added up- people were getting discouraged...

Enter my female competition-
She became the very opposite of what she started out as, and she started as the most motivated of all.
Disagreeing with the skit we were to perform (which had been chosen by our Flt/Staff because the cadets wouldn't), she began to cuss the C/Chief out "That stupid [name removed] wants us to do this [dumb (arsonist)] skit when-"
Chief was standing right next to her. Oops.

I stayed motivated and tried to push everyone in the right direction throughout the week. I felt like quitting (as in giving up on the cadets) but I knew I couldn't. I was happy that everyone started being friends near the end, and it was just a nice plus that I was rewarded for not being apathetic.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: High Speed Low Drag on July 04, 2010, 06:12:50 PM
There were some cadets that were taking the sugar packets from the dining facility, melting the sugar on irons, and used Q-tip sticks to make lolipops.  Not only that - they were selling them to cadets from the other flights.  Ended up having the staff remove all the sugar packets from all of the tables every mealtime.
 
Needless to say that when they got caught, it wasn't pretty.
 
The funniest thing about it was a cadet had made the lollipops tried to iron his blues - Had a huge splotch in the back of the shirt from the burnt sugar.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: juicedude10 on July 04, 2010, 10:23:25 PM
First encampment circa winter 1998 Homestead ARB - fire drill right in the middle of shower/personal time, next year the ops order was very specific on the types of underwear permitted and required a bathrobe or "beach towel" and the fire drill was moved to a different time.
During contraband check a cadet had fireworks confiscated from him, he said they were for New Years.
I also learned at that encampment that while I was able to deal with blues shoes that were a little too small for 2 hours once a month, I was unable to deal with it at encampment. Didn't help that I had 4 ingrown toenails.

Summer 2003, Camp Blanding FL - not really funny, but over 20 cadets completely ignored the bold "drink plenty of water prior to arrival" in the ops order and passed out during in processing. Black flag conditions all 9 days of encampment.

SER winter encampment 07 - in the middle of a staff meeting the entire staff was mobilized to search for a missing flight sergeant, he was latter found in his bed, asleep "mummified" in his blankets.
This was also the encampment that I learned it can get down to single digits in FL. Nothing like running around to all the barracks at 2am with space heaters waking up and moving around cadets. I was waking this one cadet to move him from his bed to a different one so we could but a space heater there, he would not wake up for anything, including picking the bed frame an inch off the ground an dropping it, so I started snapping about 2 inches from his head. He finally woke up and went "duuuuddddeeee what the fuc... yes sir?" Another one wouldn't wake up and we still had 4 buildings to put heaters in so we got six people and picked up his entire bed and moved him, he woke up mid move, it was priceless.


You should've gone Army style.  When my dad was in Desert Storm as an officer, his sergeant picked his sleeping bag up, w/ him in it and chucked it across the room!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 05, 2010, 12:06:30 AM
First encampment circa winter 1998 Homestead ARB - fire drill right in the middle of shower/personal time, next year the ops order was very specific on the types of underwear permitted and required a bathrobe or "beach towel" and the fire drill was moved to a different time.
During contraband check a cadet had fireworks confiscated from him, he said they were for New Years.
I also learned at that encampment that while I was able to deal with blues shoes that were a little too small for 2 hours once a month, I was unable to deal with it at encampment. Didn't help that I had 4 ingrown toenails.

Summer 2003, Camp Blanding FL - not really funny, but over 20 cadets completely ignored the bold "drink plenty of water prior to arrival" in the ops order and passed out during in processing. Black flag conditions all 9 days of encampment.

SER winter encampment 07 - in the middle of a staff meeting the entire staff was mobilized to search for a missing flight sergeant, he was latter found in his bed, asleep "mummified" in his blankets.
This was also the encampment that I learned it can get down to single digits in FL. Nothing like running around to all the barracks at 2am with space heaters waking up and moving around cadets. I was waking this one cadet to move him from his bed to a different one so we could but a space heater there, he would not wake up for anything, including picking the bed frame an inch off the ground an dropping it, so I started snapping about 2 inches from his head. He finally woke up and went "duuuuddddeeee what the fuc... yes sir?" Another one wouldn't wake up and we still had 4 buildings to put heaters in so we got six people and picked up his entire bed and moved him, he woke up mid move, it was priceless.


You should've gone Army style.  When my dad was in Desert Storm as an officer, his sergeant picked his sleeping bag up, w/ him in it and chucked it across the room!
Not to be a joykill, but that PROBABLY would not be a good idea due to the CPPT.  :)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: DakRadz on July 05, 2010, 12:09:23 AM

Not to be a joykill, but that PROBABLY would not be a good idea due to the CPPT.  :)

The fact that the Sgt did that to his officer....

As an officer hopeful, I'd say I'd be having a whole lot of fun seeing how many practical jokes I could get my lower enlisted to pull on their Sgt >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 05, 2010, 12:14:32 AM

The fact that the Sgt did that to his officer....
...Is absolutely hilarious. Threw C&C right out the window! ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: juicedude10 on July 05, 2010, 08:30:17 AM

Not to be a joykill, but that PROBABLY would not be a good idea due to the CPPT.  :)

The fact that the Sgt did that to his officer....

As an officer hopeful, I'd say I'd be having a whole lot of fun seeing how many practical jokes I could get my lower enlisted to pull on their Sgt >:D

Well, my dad woke up in mid air, and those two were good friends, so he didn't care.  And then...out in a field op, my dad was communications, and he pinned the sgt's. hand to a half stick of dynamite/grenade simulator. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: DakRadz on July 05, 2010, 07:21:51 PM

I had two competitors I was worried might receive the nomination- one was an extremely motivated cadet who showed his motivation through sheer volume- it only got worse once the staff explained diaphragm use.  :o Well, he wasn't so great at drill- he admitted this himself, but they made him guidon. He really did fairly decent, but one night he forgot the guidon completely- left it in the barracks. I think that was the main reason he didn't get the Flt/CC's support.

FAIL
He was told not to bring the guidon. Now, our Flight Staff did get mad at him-  THEY TOLD HIM NOT TO BRING IT!

I still think this is why he wasn't the nominee, even though he was following orders; I thought that he had assumed not to bring it (we were at a civies dance/banquet)- the reason I thought it was his own decision is because our Flt/CC and /Sgt looked at him with dagger eyes.

Hmmm.. Mr. Guidon may have deserved to compete then. I think so.
My apologies for the misinformation.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 05, 2010, 10:29:00 PM

FAIL
WIN
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: DakRadz on July 05, 2010, 10:32:55 PM

FAIL
WIN

How so?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 05, 2010, 10:38:50 PM

FAIL
WIN

How so?
You caught your own fail. Besides, it looked cool with the fail/win.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: DakRadz on July 05, 2010, 10:44:56 PM
I wouldn't say I caught my own... He apparently has a CAPTalk. He confronted me with less anger than he was rightly entitled too; therefore I made the correction with great haste, though not enough to make another mistake.

If you see this, Mr. Guidon, I apologize. Of course, I can also say this on Facebook. But here, all the CAPTalk folks will see it too.
And I can't believe Chief and Lt gave you looks the way they did if you were just following orders... Chief looked extremely ticked at *you*- doesn't seem fair now that I know it was really their fault. Meh.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 05, 2010, 10:55:54 PM
I wouldn't say I caught my own... He apparently has a CAPTalk. He confronted me with less anger than he was rightly entitled too; therefore I made the correction with great haste, though not enough to make another mistake.

If you see this, Mr. Guidon, I apologize. Of course, I can also say this on Facebook. But here, all the CAPTalk folks will see it too.
And I can't believe Chief and Lt gave you looks the way they did if you were just following orders... Chief looked extremely ticked at *you*- doesn't seem fair now that I know it was really their fault. Meh.
Well, it made sense to post the win because we can't see what's going on behind the scenes... unless I missed something (probably the case).
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: viperred396 on July 07, 2010, 06:23:24 PM
One of my favorite moments from the 2010 COWG encampment was after the wing inspection my entire squadron (approx. 60 cadets) were in one dorm hallway and whenever a staff member walked by the greetings got louder and louder until as soon as a staff member walked in every one yelled in unison "GOOD AFTERNOON SIR/SERGEANT!!!"  now this in itself was amusing but what made it better was one staff member ran through the hall making a "wave" of greetings
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 07, 2010, 06:26:00 PM
One of my favorite moments from the 2010 COWG encampment was after the wing inspection my entire squadron (approx. 60 cadets) were in one dorm hallway and whenever a staff member walked by the greetings got louder and louder until as soon as a staff member walked in every one yelled in unison "GOOD AFTERNOON SIR/SARGENT!!!"  now this in itself was amusing but what made it better was one staff member ran through the hall making a "wave" of greetings
Dadgumit, this is the second time i've had to bust somebody for this.  ;)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: viperred396 on July 07, 2010, 08:57:38 PM
Dadgumit, this is the second time i've had to bust somebody for this.  ;)
fixed
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: FlyTiger77 on July 07, 2010, 10:01:37 PM
One of my favorite moments from the 2010 COWG encampment was after the wing inspection my entire squadron (approx. 60 cadets) were in one dorm hallway and whenever a staff member walked by the greetings got louder and louder until as soon as a staff member walked in every one yelled in unison "GOOD AFTERNOON SIR/SARGENT!!!"  now this in itself was amusing but what made it better was one staff member ran through the hall making a "wave" of greetings
Dadgumit, this is the second time i've had to bust somebody for this.  ;)

I believe "dadgummit" has two "M's".   ;)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 07, 2010, 10:14:48 PM
One of my favorite moments from the 2010 COWG encampment was after the wing inspection my entire squadron (approx. 60 cadets) were in one dorm hallway and whenever a staff member walked by the greetings got louder and louder until as soon as a staff member walked in every one yelled in unison "GOOD AFTERNOON SIR/SARGENT!!!"  now this in itself was amusing but what made it better was one staff member ran through the hall making a "wave" of greetings
Dadgumit, this is the second time i've had to bust somebody for this.  ;)

I believe "dadgummit" has two "M's".   ;)
I was trying to figure out what I did wrong. +3 to you good sir!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 09, 2010, 07:07:18 PM
I just remembered an interesting story about my basic encampment... I was the flight guidon bearer for India Flight. the staff stole our guidon and put pink cloth over our "I". needless to say, it was hilarious going around an AFB all week with "Pink Eye"... we got to take it off for the "Dooley 500" (P&R). PR guys took plenty of pictures of it though... almost everyone in my group knew about it. I was practically famous.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: FlyTiger77 on July 09, 2010, 08:07:59 PM
I just remembered an interesting story about my basic encampment... I was the flight guidon bearer for India Flight. the staff stole our guidon and put pink cloth over our "I". needless to say, it was hilarious going around an AFB all week with "Pink Eye"... we got to take it off for the "Dooley 500" (P&R). PR guys took plenty of pictures of it though... almost everyone in my group knew about it. I was practically famous.

Methinks there may be a fine line between famous and infamous in this instance. Unfortunately, in today's society, this is becoming a distinction without a difference (cf: the train wreck formerly known as 'Lindsay Lohan').
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 09, 2010, 09:13:27 PM
I just remembered an interesting story about my basic encampment... I was the flight guidon bearer for India Flight. the staff stole our guidon and put pink cloth over our "I". needless to say, it was hilarious going around an AFB all week with "Pink Eye"... we got to take it off for the "Dooley 500" (P&R). PR guys took plenty of pictures of it though... almost everyone in my group knew about it. I was practically famous.

Methinks there may be a fine line between famous and infamous in this instance. Unfortunately, in today's society, this is becoming a distinction without a difference (cf: the train wreck formerly known as 'Lindsay Lohan').

Yeah, I've been watching her on the news. Needless to say, her additude and manipulation towards the judge is, how shall I put it,  less than impressive.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: GTCommando on September 08, 2010, 12:26:03 AM
OH wing's 2009 Summer Encampment, I was in Alpha Squadron, Bravo Flight (Gotta love Alpha Assassins). The last night, we had a dining in complete with MREs. Not very tasty, but beside the point. Afterward, during Retreat Ceremony, the staff decided to catch us off guard. They waited until after they played the National Anthem, then sneaked up behind us with enough water guns for a mini King's Island! Needless to say, two out of three squadrons rather suddenly broke ranks (The remaining squadron, I believe, had some advanced warning). After we (Finally) got back into formation, A friend of mine at the front of the flight pulled out his canteen (Which had just been refilled with seemingly ice-cold water) and gave our Flight Commander another one for good measure. After that we packed up and headed back to the dorms.  ;D

P.S. This is unconfirmed report, but the cadet in question is believed to have been extremely thirsty the whole ride back.  ::)     
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: GTM SGT Frazier on November 15, 2010, 05:48:52 PM
After reading some of these (some i was laughing pretty hard others i was rolling my eyes) I can't wait to go to an encampment haha


You will love it
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Nor'easter on January 23, 2011, 01:24:48 PM
Has anyone else had guidon snatchers? Every year at NJWG Encampment, there is one staff member (usually senior) who steals guidon whenever theyre posted and no ones looking. BEST place to hide guidons? Roll it up and tape it on top of a ceiling fan ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on January 23, 2011, 05:29:14 PM
Has anyone else had guidon snatchers? Every year at NJWG Encampment, there is one staff member (usually senior) who steals guidon whenever theyre posted and no ones looking. BEST place to hide guidons? Roll it up and tape it on top of a ceiling fan ;D
Happens every encampment here in FLWG. This recent winter enc. Squadron 3 had theirs stolen. IDK where it went though...  >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Top Dawg on January 23, 2011, 11:21:56 PM
Has anyone else had guidon snatchers? Every year at NJWG Encampment, there is one staff member (usually senior) who steals guidon whenever theyre posted and no ones looking. BEST place to hide guidons? Roll it up and tape it on top of a ceiling fan ;D
Happens every encampment here in FLWG. This recent winter enc. Squadron 3 had theirs stolen. IDK where it went though...  >:D

Yes, yes, yes, this was my cadet. It ended up in C/Maj Tran's possession. We got squadron of encampment, anyway
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on January 23, 2011, 11:54:15 PM
Haha I think it's funny how it's always to do with squadron 3 when it comes to guidons being stolen... Last year India flight this year squadron 3. One can only guess next years victim...  >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Top Dawg on January 24, 2011, 12:32:20 PM
Haha I think it's funny how it's always to do with squadron 3 when it comes to guidons being stolen... Last year India flight this year squadron 3. One can only guess next years victim...  >:D

Juliet Flight left their guidon at the auditorium so we picked it up. We had to give it back, though.  :'(
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: BillB on January 24, 2011, 12:45:54 PM
It used to be Florida Wing policy that when stealing a guideon you only took the flag, leaving the guideon staff. This meant that the flight had a "naked" staff for formations. Since now this might cause embarassment to the guideon beare, it probably would be a violation of CPP.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on January 24, 2011, 01:39:06 PM
It used to be Florida Wing policy that when stealing a guideon you only took the flag, leaving the guideon staff. This meant that the flight had a "naked" staff for formations. Since now this might cause embarassment to the guideon beare, it probably would be a violation of CPP.
First the grog bowl, now guidon stealing. What isn't a CPP violation these days?  ::)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 24, 2011, 01:45:25 PM
It used to be Florida Wing policy that when stealing a guideon you only took the flag, leaving the guideon staff. This meant that the flight had a "naked" staff for formations. Since now this might cause embarassment to the guideon beare, it probably would be a violation of CPP.
First the grog bowl, now guidon stealing. What isn't a CPP violation these days?

I think you are confusing "dumb" and "immature" with "violation of CPP".

We routinely have one or more flights with a "furled" guidon because they have not met the minimum expectations
that earns their flight this recognition.  This is not hazing.

Guidon stealing is a bad idea for a number of reasons, not the least of which are the fact that in some cases it results
in people running with what is essentially a spear in their hands, and the fact that CAP guidons are not cheap.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Slim on January 24, 2011, 04:58:40 PM
How exactly does guidon stealing contribute to the objectives (the "mission"-if you will) of an encampment?

How about those core values, like integrity?  Or, since a lot of places are obsessed with preaching the honor code ripped off from USAFA: "We will not lie, cheat or steal, nor tolerate among us those who do."  On the one hand, you're telling cadets that they can't steal.  On the other, you have some staff member (cadet or senior) who is so focused on stealing that they can't concentrate on performing their job?

We used to allow it, until it got out of control.  Cadets sleeping with their guidon, showering with it, swinging it like a baseball bat, posting a guard on it outside the DFAC or classroom.  One year, one flight commander got the bright idea to set up a separate schedule so that there was always one cadet in the flight who was awake to guard it at night. 

On the other hand, if zulu flight is 100 yards outbound from the DFAC, and their guidon isn't, it would behoove someone to recover it before it disappears.  But actually going out of your way to steal it?  Nope, don't have the time for it.  There are enough new experiences and stressors involved in an encampment that this doesn't need to be another one.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: JoeTomasone on January 25, 2011, 12:20:41 AM
I certainly would not have condoned it had I been aware of it.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on January 25, 2011, 12:35:45 AM
It used to be Florida Wing policy (?!?!!!) that when stealing (!!!!) a guideon  ... Since now this might cause embarrassment :o  (!?!?!) to the guideon beare, it probably would be a violation of CPP.
A policy on how to carry out the act of stealing, and someone might be worried about CPPT?  ???  Chutzpah!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Slim on January 25, 2011, 03:03:15 AM
I certainly would not have condoned it had I been aware of it.

That wasn't intended as an indictment against you, Joe.  Think of it more along the lines of "Food for thought" for the folks out there who get a kick out of it.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: tsrup on January 25, 2011, 11:17:04 AM
When I was a TACO, cadet staff participated in guidon stealing.  However the rules were, you couldn't steal a properly secured guidon.  It was mainly an attention to detail drill. 
However, like most things, it got out of hand really quickly.  So next year when I was an Assistant Commandant, I put the kibosh on the idea.

This year will be the same.

I feel that this will go the way of what many cadet's call "encampment traditions".  It will be forgotten after next year..   
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MICT1362 on January 25, 2011, 12:11:10 PM
I have been to several encampments over the years and it happens.  The staff has always layed down some rules and rarely have we had issues.  The couple of times that an issue came up, the cadet staff did a quick review of the circumstances and made a decision.

Never was their forceful stealing of a guidon, no treachery.  But, as already stated, if you left building X, but your guidon didn't... Well, it's mine now.  This requires every person in the flight to be accountable along with the guidon bearer.

So, to each their own.  And I do not believe in any way that this can be a violation of CPP.

-Paramedic
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ProdigalJim on January 25, 2011, 10:28:53 PM
OK, not a guidon story, but a prank nonetheless...

It was 1980, and Plattsburgh AFB, NY, was still, well, an Air Force Base. 200 NY Wing cadets show up for two weeks of Type A fun on the shores of Lake Champlain. We got a visit from the new CAP Executive Director, an Air Force one-star whose name, for some reason, escapes me right now. (Gen. Miller maybe?) A group of us "non-staff" cadets were selected to sit down at the lunch table with the General...mingle, talk about the program, the Encampment, so forth. I see the sugar is being passed from person to person for coffee cups (yes, I was an early addict), and I'm probably three or four passes away from the General. I realize as soon as I sip the coffee that someone has spiked the sugar container with salt, in hopes of "punking" our one-star VIP.

The gyrations that took place at that table to try to recover the sugar bottle before it made it the rest of the way down were legendary. "Oh, General, take the sugar from THAT table. It POURS better." Egad...  ;D

It was the first, and only, encampment I ever attended where I wasn't on staff. And in some ways, it was the most fun, too.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Reno on March 16, 2011, 05:30:38 PM
I joined CAP a week before Arkansas Wing encampment took place in 08. I was 17 at the time.
 By the time '09 encampment rolled around I was an 18 year old Tech Sergeant. My flight sergeant was a 14 or 15 year of Staff Sergeant. All week long I was mistaken for the flight sergeant and occasionally quizzed cadets from other squadrons on their memory work/ yelled at them to hurry up out of the latrine ect.. haha It was fun. I believe I was the oldest Cadet in attendance (staff included) except maybe the cadet encampment commander.

For '10 I was selected as Command Chief. I had to turn it down but I definitely regret it. Hopefully I'll be able to go back this year in a senior slot.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: mclarke on April 18, 2011, 06:05:27 PM
I remember a encampment flight sergeant that caught everyones attention with his boots. The dumb kid brought Clorfam combat boots. We never did find out how he got them or why he brought them to encampment but he caught **** for it all weekend.

Galls.com has them... I am getting a pair for parades...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: mclarke on April 18, 2011, 11:09:30 PM
My understanding is it has a lot to do with pride, and yes, honor. UNLESS the guidon is posted somewhere requiring all members to be inside or otherwise engaged, it should have a guard. This teaches accountability, integrity, duty, attention to detail, and discipline.

In the event it is left alone (say, outside the barracks when all members are away doing drill some otherside of the base), then I would encourage taking it. HOWEVER, I feel that it is only fair and honest to give it back upon there return.

Kind of more of a lesson learned in "Our gear is important, safeguard it and treat it as you would your own stuff at home". I think the only problem is ensuring that the TACs and other staff make sure noone goes stealing on purpose.

How exactly does guidon stealing contribute to the objectives (the "mission"-if you will) of an encampment?

How about those core values, like integrity?  Or, since a lot of places are obsessed with preaching the honor code ripped off from USAFA: "We will not lie, cheat or steal, nor tolerate among us those who do."  On the one hand, you're telling cadets that they can't steal.  On the other, you have some staff member (cadet or senior) who is so focused on stealing that they can't concentrate on performing their job?

We used to allow it, until it got out of control.  Cadets sleeping with their guidon, showering with it, swinging it like a baseball bat, posting a guard on it outside the DFAC or classroom.  One year, one flight commander got the bright idea to set up a separate schedule so that there was always one cadet in the flight who was awake to guard it at night. 

On the other hand, if zulu flight is 100 yards outbound from the DFAC, and their guidon isn't, it would behoove someone to recover it before it disappears.  But actually going out of your way to steal it?  Nope, don't have the time for it.  There are enough new experiences and stressors involved in an encampment that this doesn't need to be another one.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on April 18, 2011, 11:20:36 PM
I remember a encampment flight sergeant that caught everyones attention with his boots. The dumb kid brought Clorfam combat boots. We never did find out how he got them or why he brought them to encampment but he caught **** for it all weekend.

Galls.com has them... I am getting a pair for parades...

I recommend not doing so. Your feet and your wallet will both love you later.

Corfam (note spelling) boots are hot, and do not "break in" as well or quickly as leather boots. Additionally, a parade is one of the easiest venues for screwing up your fantastic shine, outside of being out in the field doing ES stuff.

BTDT.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: mclarke on April 18, 2011, 11:28:02 PM
I remember a encampment flight sergeant that caught everyones attention with his boots. The dumb kid brought Clorfam combat boots. We never did find out how he got them or why he brought them to encampment but he caught **** for it all weekend.

Galls.com has them... I am getting a pair for parades...

I recommend not doing so. Your feet and your wallet will both love you later.

Corfam (note spelling) boots are hot, and do not "break in" as well or quickly as leather boots. Additionally, a parade is one of the easiest venues for screwing up your fantastic shine, outside of being out in the field doing ES stuff.

BTDT.

I know. I am getting both regular (jungle black/black) for field and the clorfam ones for  events... there not gonna be something I wear all the time
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PA Guy on April 18, 2011, 11:37:22 PM
I remember a encampment flight sergeant that caught everyones attention with his boots. The dumb kid brought Clorfam combat boots. We never did find out how he got them or why he brought them to encampment but he caught **** for it all weekend.

Galls.com has them... I am getting a pair for parades...

They look tacky.  YMMV
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on April 18, 2011, 11:41:14 PM
I remember a encampment flight sergeant that caught everyones attention with his boots. The dumb kid brought Clorfam combat boots. We never did find out how he got them or why he brought them to encampment but he caught **** for it all weekend.

Galls.com has them... I am getting a pair for parades...

I recommend not doing so. Your feet and your wallet will both love you later.

Corfam (note spelling) boots are hot, and do not "break in" as well or quickly as leather boots. Additionally, a parade is one of the easiest venues for screwing up your fantastic shine, outside of being out in the field doing ES stuff.

BTDT.

I know. I am getting both regular (jungle black/black) for field and the clorfam ones for  events... there not gonna be something I wear all the time

Well, it's your feet, and your money.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: CAPC/officer125 on April 19, 2011, 06:19:58 PM
At KSWG Encampments, guidon stealing has been outlawed. The only way a guidon can get "snatched" is if it is left by the flight and they don't realize it, a command staff member or senior may grab it up and take it back to Wing HQ (our encampments are at Wing HQ), to sit in the encampment commander's office. It is up to the encampment commander how the flight will get their guidon back. Over the past couple couple years, they have required a letter written by the flight asking for it back and a little bit of groveling. We have also done away with singing to get misplaced items back.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Rogovin on April 28, 2011, 03:51:33 PM
Well, this story isnt about encampment, but it is of the same brand.  At the Norwich University Future Leader's Camp (NU FLC) we take a 3-day 2-night bivouac.  "Combat showers" (baby wipe wipedowns), burying *ahem* waste, MRE's, cooking your own dinner over a fire, building hooches, other woodland survival skills.  Well, a dear friend of mine (and everyone else at FLC) was one of the participants.  So he goes to do his business, and realizing he forgot his toilet paper, he uses leaves from a nearby vine, and wipes himself.  Later that day, he took the class on how to ID plants in the Vermont woodlands.  He then realizes he wiped himself with poison ivy, and very shortly we hear he went back to the barracks to get treated for poison ivy.  I talked to him recently, and he described the treatment with words that are unfit to repeat here (and he wasn't cursing, it was was just GROSS, and a bad analogy).  He recently visited Norwich University (he wants to go to college there), and the 1SGT, who was the ROTC cadet in charge of the FLC program, is now the Cadet in charge of the Brigade at Norwich.  He sees the friend, and in front of the whole rook class (aka freshmen aka plebes) leaving the rooks thinking "who the hell is this guy and why is the toughest guy we know HUGGING him?"

-Rogovin
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Starlock on May 03, 2011, 02:13:29 PM
At KSWG Encampments, guidon stealing has been outlawed. The only way a guidon can get "snatched" is if it is left by the flight and they don't realize it, a command staff member or senior may grab it up and take it back to Wing HQ (our encampments are at Wing HQ), to sit in the encampment commander's office. It is up to the encampment commander how the flight will get their guidon back. Over the past couple couple years, they have required a letter written by the flight asking for it back and a little bit of groveling. We have also done away with singing to get misplaced items back.

A certain 2Lt Roarty told me about this  ;D I think we should do this at MOWG's CTGs as well.

As for an encampment story...

At ILWG 2010 the ATS (Advanced Training School) had a nighttime tactical water balloon fight in the "back yard" of the Illinois Military Academy. Basically if you marched down a half mile long road leading off the drill pad, you'd go over a creek and the road led to a simulated firing range. The event was ATS vs Encampment Senior staff. We took all sorts of pre-measures like turning our blouses inside out to blend us with the grass better (all 10 acres of flat green grass) and a couple of senior members used vehicles (one was the "SARMobile" and the other was an Illinois State Trooper Impala) to patrol for us ATS. About an hour into creeping my way over the grass with another cadet, dodging the spotlights from vehicles and foot patrols, I got up and tried to cross the bridge. Bad mistake. I jumped over the concrete wall and dove into a ditch and one of the seniors spotted me and shouted for others to hit me with water balloons. Granted, I had another 300 yards to run and I decided to [try to] sprint. A second after someone shouted "Run Forrest run!" my boot got stuck under some vine (?) and I tripped. Into a ditch. And nearly broke my nose.
The end!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: davidsinn on May 03, 2011, 02:34:57 PM
At KSWG Encampments, guidon stealing has been outlawed. The only way a guidon can get "snatched" is if it is left by the flight and they don't realize it, a command staff member or senior may grab it up and take it back to Wing HQ (our encampments are at Wing HQ), to sit in the encampment commander's office. It is up to the encampment commander how the flight will get their guidon back. Over the past couple couple years, they have required a letter written by the flight asking for it back and a little bit of groveling. We have also done away with singing to get misplaced items back.

A certain 2Lt Roarty told me about this  ;D I think we should do this at MOWG's CTGs as well.

As for an encampment story...

At ILWG 2010 the ATS (Advanced Training School) had a nighttime tactical water balloon fight in the "back yard" of the Illinois Military Academy. Basically if you marched down a half mile long road leading off the drill pad, you'd go over a creek and the road led to a simulated firing range. The event was ATS vs Encampment Senior staff. We took all sorts of pre-measures like turning our blouses inside out to blend us with the grass better (all 10 acres of flat green grass) and a couple of senior members used vehicles (one was the "SARMobile" and the other was an Illinois State Trooper Impala) to patrol for us ATS. About an hour into creeping my way over the grass with another cadet, dodging the spotlights from vehicles and foot patrols, I got up and tried to cross the bridge. Bad mistake. I jumped over the concrete wall and dove into a ditch and one of the seniors spotted me and shouted for others to hit me with water balloons. Granted, I had another 300 yards to run and I decided to [try to] sprint. A second after someone shouted "Run Forrest run!" my boot got stuck under some vine (?) and I tripped. Into a ditch. And nearly broke my nose.
The end!

That sounds like a lot of fun. I can't believe the safety Nazis let you do it. >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spaceman3750 on May 03, 2011, 02:35:59 PM
At KSWG Encampments, guidon stealing has been outlawed. The only way a guidon can get "snatched" is if it is left by the flight and they don't realize it, a command staff member or senior may grab it up and take it back to Wing HQ (our encampments are at Wing HQ), to sit in the encampment commander's office. It is up to the encampment commander how the flight will get their guidon back. Over the past couple couple years, they have required a letter written by the flight asking for it back and a little bit of groveling. We have also done away with singing to get misplaced items back.

A certain 2Lt Roarty told me about this  ;D I think we should do this at MOWG's CTGs as well.

As for an encampment story...

At ILWG 2010 the ATS (Advanced Training School) had a nighttime tactical water balloon fight in the "back yard" of the Illinois Military Academy. Basically if you marched down a half mile long road leading off the drill pad, you'd go over a creek and the road led to a simulated firing range. The event was ATS vs Encampment Senior staff. We took all sorts of pre-measures like turning our blouses inside out to blend us with the grass better (all 10 acres of flat green grass) and a couple of senior members used vehicles (one was the "SARMobile" and the other was an Illinois State Trooper Impala) to patrol for us ATS. About an hour into creeping my way over the grass with another cadet, dodging the spotlights from vehicles and foot patrols, I got up and tried to cross the bridge. Bad mistake. I jumped over the concrete wall and dove into a ditch and one of the seniors spotted me and shouted for others to hit me with water balloons. Granted, I had another 300 yards to run and I decided to [try to] sprint. A second after someone shouted "Run Forrest run!" my boot got stuck under some vine (?) and I tripped. Into a ditch. And nearly broke my nose.
The end!

That sounds like a lot of fun. I can't believe the safety Nazis let you do it. >:D
Sounds like a good 5th weekend activity.

I can't believe ISP let them use their Impala ;D.

By the way, what is the SARmobile?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Starlock on May 03, 2011, 02:38:06 PM
That and the entire week was awesome! Minus the bloody nose and the bandaging from when I tried to dodge a Nissan on my bike the week prior. I was the medical officer's "favorite cadet".

Spaceman, the SARmobile is basically a decomm ambulance with all of its EMT equipment ripped out and replaced with everything a mobile mission command center would need, from MREs to First Aid kits to a couple L-Pers and its own wi-fi network. Seriously. It has wi-fi.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spaceman3750 on May 03, 2011, 02:40:17 PM
That and the entire week was awesome! Minus the bloody nose and the bandaging from when I tried to dodge a Nissan on my bike the week prior. I was the medical officer's "favorite cadet".

Spaceman, the SARmobile is basically a decomm ambulance with all of its EMT equipment ripped out and replaced with everything a mobile mission command center would need, from MREs to First Aid kits to a couple L-Pers and its own wi-fi network. Seriously. It has wi-fi.

Oh, cool. I wonder if it's a CAP asset or someone's baby...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on May 03, 2011, 02:46:55 PM
Like this?

(http://group22.net/katrina/stennis/CAP_JTF-Katrina_7-14_Sept_05_Williams_0162.jpg)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Starlock on May 06, 2011, 12:24:16 PM
A bit like that! It was an ILWG vehicle though.
I'm actually in one of two MOWG squadrons to have "SARmobiles", and our squadron's is basically the beast's (one pictures above) clone. Belonged to Redbird, Redbird shut down, Lt. Col. Riddle came down, brought his SARmobile with him
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on May 06, 2011, 12:36:10 PM
AH, well if it came from ILWG, then it was / is a POV.  We don't have anything but vans in the COV fleet (and a couple of trailers).
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on May 06, 2011, 10:35:05 PM
That was probably Ted Lohr's Suburban. I was at the encampment and that's the only vehicle that comes close to matching his description and it don't have wifi.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on May 07, 2011, 12:17:09 AM
That was probably Ted Lohr's Suburban. I was at the encampment and that's the only vehicle that comes close to matching his description and it don't have wifi.

Heh - now "beast" would be a good description of that for sure...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PWK-GT on May 07, 2011, 12:25:40 AM
AH, well if it came from ILWG, then it was / is a POV.  We don't have anything but vans in the COV fleet (and a couple of trailers).
Didn't a certain ILWG someone have a decom ambo that kept blowing tires on the way back north? Seems to me I heard a story about that one from you.....
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on May 07, 2011, 12:47:25 AM
AH, well if it came from ILWG, then it was / is a POV.  We don't have anything but vans in the COV fleet (and a couple of trailers).
Didn't a certain ILWG someone have a decom ambo that kept blowing tires on the way back north? Seems to me I heard a story about that one from you....

Heh, he still has it and drives it - actually a mini-cam truck that still has the mast, used for comms, now, generator and all.  My understanding is it has all newer tires now.  ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on May 07, 2011, 09:18:09 AM
That might have been it, but he's usually on a Walmart run about that time. They know him on a first name basis at the Walmart on Dirksen Parkway.  ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Starlock on May 09, 2011, 06:35:43 PM
That was probably Ted Lohr's Suburban. I was at the encampment and that's the only vehicle that comes close to matching his description and it don't have wifi.

Yes, it was Lt. Col. Lohr's. I said wi-fi because I believe the two out here have air cards/routers.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MCRmy on May 26, 2011, 10:26:24 PM
One of my favorite encampment moments: A cadet had a stuffed animal dog ??? and we had confiscated it at the beginning of encampment. As first Sergeant it was my job to wake up the cadets. It was Graduation Day of MAWG 2010. I went into the middle of the room and using the dog as a puppet said: "Bow Wow says its time to get up Cadets and that there's no PT this morning. Yayyy! Bow Wow also says that you need to clean the bay, pack your bags, and prep your luggage. Yayyy!"
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Flyinsarge on May 26, 2011, 11:25:29 PM
When my flight sergeant was mad at us for something (I forget what) and he yelled that he would burn us if we didn't do "it" right that time.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: sneakers on May 26, 2011, 11:40:30 PM
My favorite memory is when C/LtCol CC at my basic encampment was leading the white glove inspection in my barracks. He makes a remark about how dusty it is, then... "achoo, achoo". It was hilarious, yet I managed to keep a straight face even though it happened right in front of me.

Pt is also a proud memory. My squadron consisted of two flights, so around 30 cadets. Out of these, 3 or 4 had pulled hamstrings, a number were vomiting, and about half the squadron had to fall out because the pt was so intense. I managed to stay in. No other squadron at the encampment could match us for pt. We won the pt award hands down at the end of the week.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eagle on July 12, 2011, 03:10:51 PM
At my encampment, a couple of guys from my flight were on CQ, on the last night of Encampment, and this staff member just walks right by them wearing his pants on his head and his blouse as pants. Hilarious. Can't wait till I go back and staff XD
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Nighthawk on July 24, 2011, 10:56:21 PM
when i was at encampment and on CQ, i was pretty tired because i didn't sleep well for the whole week. To my credit, i stayed awake, but there was this black cat that came up to the barracks door and stared at me from about 5 feet away for about 10-15 minutes. since i was so tired, i didn't have a clue what was happening, i just though a random shadow had walked over and stared at me.
 then, another night, one of the cadet staff was coming down the stars in his boxers and sleepshirt, muttering about something. with his eyes closed, he descended the stars, went into the bathroom, walked in a large circle, ascended the stars and then went back into his room. asleep the entire time.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: DakRadz on July 25, 2011, 08:42:16 PM
when i was at encampment and on CQ, i was pretty tired because i didn't sleep well for the whole week. To my credit, i stayed awake, but there was this black cat that came up to the barracks door and stared at me from about 5 feet away for about 10-15 minutes. since i was so tired, i didn't have a clue what was happening, i just though a random shadow had walked over and stared at me.
 then, another night, one of the cadet staff was coming down the stars in his boxers and sleepshirt, muttering about something. with his eyes closed, he descended the stars, went into the bathroom, walked in a large circle, ascended the stars and then went back into his room. asleep the entire time.

More sleep, cadet. If you saw him ascend the stars, I'd like to know what other hallucinations you had.
 ;D ;D
I'm kidding, nice story- sleepwalkers are always fun.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on July 25, 2011, 10:10:19 PM
when i was at encampment and on CQ, i was pretty tired because i didn't sleep well for the whole week. To my credit, i stayed awake, but there was this black cat that came up to the barracks door and stared at me from about 5 feet away for about 10-15 minutes. since i was so tired, i didn't have a clue what was happening, i just though a random shadow had walked over and stared at me.
 then, another night, one of the cadet staff was coming down the stars in his boxers and sleepshirt, muttering about something. with his eyes closed, he descended the stars, went into the bathroom, walked in a large circle, ascended the stars and then went back into his room. asleep the entire time.

More sleep, cadet. If you saw him ascend the stars, I'd like to know what other hallucinations you had.
 ;D ;D
I'm kidding, nice story- sleepwalkers are always fun.

Cues Stairway to Heaven.  8)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: jeders on July 25, 2011, 10:26:25 PM
when i was at encampment and on CQ, i was pretty tired because i didn't sleep well for the whole week. To my credit, i stayed awake, but there was this black cat that came up to the barracks door and stared at me from about 5 feet away for about 10-15 minutes. since i was so tired, i didn't have a clue what was happening, i just though a random shadow had walked over and stared at me.
 then, another night, one of the cadet staff was coming down the stars in his boxers and sleepshirt, muttering about something. with his eyes closed, he descended the stars, went into the bathroom, walked in a large circle, ascended the stars and then went back into his room. asleep the entire time.

More sleep, cadet. If you saw him ascend the stars, I'd like to know what other hallucinations you had.
 ;D ;D
I'm kidding, nice story- sleepwalkers are always fun.

Cues Stairway to Heaven.  8)

(http://codinghorror.typepad.com/.a/6a0120a85dcdae970b0128777002e2970c-pi)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: M.N. on July 26, 2011, 12:48:03 PM
At my encampment, a couple of guys from my flight were on CQ, on the last night of Encampment, and this staff member just walks right by them wearing his pants on his head and his blouse as pants. Hilarious. Can't wait till I go back and staff XD
I had a similar thing happen when I was on CQ. After I returned with my replacements, I found a SM wearing a elephant-esque gas mask while at the same time hauling around a cadet staff member in a trash bin. Of course, my sleep deprivation made me perceive it like this:
(http://news.pillaicenter.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/ganesha.jpg)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: OkinawaLt on July 27, 2011, 03:46:52 AM
I belong to the Okinawa Cadet Squadron on Kadena USAF Base, Okinawa, Japan. The squadron was only restarted after a long administrative hiatus about a year ago. Because of the new newness of the squadron the cadets that we absorbed started out on the bottom of the rank spectrum. I, a C/2Lt, had to fill every cadet staff role.
We (the senior staff and I) decided to set up an Encampment in the Winter (as opposed to the summer which in Okinawa every day is black flag) so that the new cadets could learn some of the basic skills necessary to be successful in the cadet program. Fortunately (a real godsend) two cadets from Georgia wing volunteered to be cadet staff along with me and paid the expensive price to take the flight over here.
Once the encampment rolled around, however, I realized that in telling my cadets all of the good things about encampment I had neglected to tell the bad stuff. They had no idea what it was actually supposed to be like. They arrived the day after Christmas and were immediately shocked to find myself and my cadet staff (whom they had never met) yelling at them. In a slightly twisted way it was funny to see their confusion. For one cadet it was his first CAP related anything as a member (due to a strange quirk in the regs regarding Overseas squadrons cadets did not have to reach the minimum of cadet Airman before attending an encampment) and he had missed the email about showing up in uniform. The C/CMSgt from Georgia proceeded to tear him up over that and ordered him to quickly put on his uniform before checking in.
In total we had six basic cadets, three cadet staff, and an ever-changing group of senior staff. Together we could see everything the basics did wrong. By the end of the first day all the basics (the oldest being 15, the youngest 11) were huddled in on room together crying.
Despite all that the cadets did learn surprisingly quickly considering they knew next to nothing when they arrived. We had relatively few discipline issues and the cadets worked well as a team. I felt proud of all of them when I got to shake their hands and give them there Encampment Ribbons during graduation.

Well, that's the story of my quirky Okinawan Encampment as staff. I hope you enjoyed it.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Skydude61 on August 15, 2011, 04:49:15 PM
Here's the best from my basic year, last week.

1.  Our flight's Lt. Was somewhat "skittish" and was rarely with us the entire week. the last day, he came over to our barracks to talk to us and give us a pep talk. nine guys from my flight pantsed themselves, and then group hugged him. needless to say, we scared him off

2. memorable quotes :
                         Alpha's Flight Commander: "dude, my CamelBak just tried to eat my Tongue"
                         Mess Sgt. : "If you don't like my food go eat in the other mess hall". (our camp only has one mess hall)
                         Golf Flight Sgt. : "APOLOGIZE TO MY SPOON FOR CALLING ME ..... " (substitute whatever insult you will for .....)
                       
                           
3. CQ. Our Mess sgt. Cape up to us to us and chatted at us for a while then said, "I need some air". we then took his Id#, and other info neccessary. He then stepped outside, and propmptly returned. "wait, you guys are really gonna question me again?'' he refused to show us ID, and then had to walk aroud the barracks to the other side to get in

4. A Lt. Col walked into the Latrine, and it was called to attention. the first sgt. was displeased at the lack of snapping to attn. so he yelled at us "Crap At Attention!!!!!"

5. One Cadet from Delta flight did 120 push ups. we were all waiting on him to finish, after we did 30 or 40.

Finally, Funny formation. this was where the Sqdrn commanders yelled at us, and then the rest of the staff came running out of the barracks like complete morons. they had things like dart guns, lightsabers and clone trooper helmets.



Fun stuff.......
4.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on August 15, 2011, 05:21:57 PM
Encampment 2006 Quotes/Inside Jokes:

*Looks at the chart that says "Profanity is not quality leadership"* "What the F$&% is this s%&t?"

"Awkward"
"Hey, it doesn't feel like encampment"
"It's not cheating if you are setting the example"
"Forget 'raising the bar' it's 'Raising the standards to our expectations' "
"ah...what's my job again?"
"Home sweet home"
"I don't want to leave"
"I want to be an RDC"
"Pimp Step Harch is so pimp"
"I got these for 20 bucks! No tax!"
"they have big cans of shoe polish here!"
" 'what about hawk mountain shir...' *Death Glare to Cadet* 'We don't talk about Hawk Mountain at my encampment...' "
"67.7 percent of all statistics are made up on the spot!"
"Code Blue"......"Stay Seated!"
____________________​____________________​__
 Encampment 2007 Quotes/Inside Jokes:

The String
The Binder
The Battery
The Penny
"Ow, my eye!"
"Ow, my nose!"
"What size do you need? Um, Elephant 1?"
"We funded the Encampment with this stuff!"
"You got Screwed!"
"You got double screwed!"
"Now lets not let this become a triple screw."
"Support staff, can you tone it down a bit? You workin' too good. Showing everyone else up..."
"Johnny Jihad"
"What makes the grass grow? Blood Blood Blood"
"Aghhhhh!"
"What is the buttstock used for? Bashing Brains, Petty Officer!"
"SALUDE"


If those don't make sense to outsiders, it's because you really had to be there.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: titanII on August 15, 2011, 07:50:22 PM
At my Basic Encampment, this summer:
         My first night on CQ, I had stopped at the end of the bay, and was standing there for a while. Then, a small wood frog hops from around the corner. The frog took a few more hops, and then stopped in the middle of a doorway. I called my flight mate, who was also on CQ duty over. He just looked at the frog, back at me, and laughed. It just stayed their for the rest of my shift. The next morning, I found out that almost all the cadets that also had CQ that night saw the frog. The frog was also seen on other nights for the rest of Encampment.
I always wondered wear that little guy came from...     ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: mrcadet on April 30, 2012, 08:54:39 AM
one time myself and another cadet from my flight were walking to the buffalo to fill up on water, when we walk by the bathroom he all of a sudden says oh wait I need to wash out my camelback and i replied oh did it mildew over night? He says no i didn’t want to wake up the flight sergeant so i took a pee in it!  xD     
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: manfredvonrichthofen on April 30, 2012, 10:27:21 AM
one time myself and another cadet from my flight were walking to the buffalo to fill up on water, when we walk by the bathroom he all of a sudden says oh wait I need to wash out my camelback and i replied oh did it mildew over night? He says no i didn’t want to wake up the flight sergeant so i took a pee in it!  xD   

HA!!! Again... CANTEENS!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: mrcadet on May 01, 2012, 10:47:56 AM
One time at encampment the encampment commander said hey guys we had a cadet that saw a panther and started chasing it… don’t do that.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MilitaryGirlClair on May 08, 2012, 09:25:04 PM
I went to Camp Pendleton in CA 2010. I was a basic. I don't know how they let me in. There was two girl flights Foxtrot and Charlie. I was in Foxtrot. I am not bragging, but at the end, I had guys cutting in to dance with me. I didn't mind of course, I was 12, too young to understand. But so I was getting my groove on when someone pushes me in the middle :-[ They kept yelling at me to dance and crud like that, I finally pushed my way out, and then some officer puts a small cadet on his shoulder and spins. ORM people! He got yelled at, and they both looked really embaressed. Pretty funny!
      Also my frined X (to protect the name) had a crush on the cadet commander. At the dance she danced with him and would not stop talking about him!
      My most fave memory EVER was a girl named Conception. She had such a beautiful voice. About the 5th night there, she sang a song for Foxtrot. Nonetheless, EVERYONE was crying, even the flight commander and flight sergeant. I wish I could relive that encampment! :P
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Brad on May 09, 2012, 05:53:57 AM
Parris Island. 'nuff said. Too many stories to count.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 09, 2012, 06:31:36 AM
      My most fave memory EVER was a girl named Conception. She had such a beautiful voice. About the 5th night there, she sang a song for Foxtrot. Nonetheless, EVERYONE was crying, even the flight commander and flight sergeant. I wish I could relive that encampment! :P

That would be something to see... An encampment flight sergeant and flight comander crying.  :D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on May 09, 2012, 11:13:25 AM
      My most fave memory EVER was a girl named Conception. She had such a beautiful voice. About the 5th night there, she sang a song for Foxtrot. Nonetheless, EVERYONE was crying, even the flight commander and flight sergeant. I wish I could relive that encampment! :P

That would be something to see... An encampment flight sergeant and flight comander crying.  :D
Common knowledge: Line staff are soulless monsters that are out to destroy your life.  >:D >:D

Kidding.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on May 09, 2012, 12:26:30 PM
Parris Island. 'nuff said. Too many stories to count.

Uh Brad, we're talking CADET Encampment here, not your "I was stupid and raised my hand and signed the papers and this is what I got." trip to the Island. ;)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Perez on May 09, 2012, 12:26:45 PM
My basic year at encampment the exec staff hid in our room. It's about a minute after lights out, and we start to hear what sounds like a horse neighing, along with some other more immature sounds. We immediately all looked over at "that" cadet and tell him to shush. After a while, it kept on going, and we realized it was none of us. So someone gets out of bed to examine the locker where the sound's coming from. The cadet tugs on the handle a few times and then whispers, "it's jammed shut!." Just then two line staff members explode out of the lockers and tell us to go back to bed. We get back in out racks, and a few minutes later we hear sound effects from the original mario game coming from a trash can. A couple seconds later it topples over and someone else runs out.

Needless to say, we were pleased when we were presented with the "most interesting after dark conversation" award.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: bflynn on May 09, 2012, 02:10:39 PM
Parris Island. 'nuff said. Too many stories to count.

Uh Brad, we're talking CADET Encampment here, not your "I was stupid and raised my hand and signed the papers and this is what I got." trip to the Island. ;)

Different methods used because of the different maturity levels of the participants, but it's the same basic recipe...even though everyone will immediately jump up and down and yell that it isn't.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Nathan on May 09, 2012, 03:20:57 PM
Parris Island. 'nuff said. Too many stories to count.

Uh Brad, we're talking CADET Encampment here, not your "I was stupid and raised my hand and signed the papers and this is what I got." trip to the Island. ;)

Different methods used because of the different maturity levels of the participants, but it's the same basic recipe...even though everyone will immediately jump up and down and yell that it isn't.

Do you have to take everything seriously?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on May 09, 2012, 07:38:24 PM
Parris Island. 'nuff said. Too many stories to count.

Uh Brad, we're talking CADET Encampment here, not your "I was stupid and raised my hand and signed the papers and this is what I got." trip to the Island. ;)

Different methods used because of the different maturity levels of the participants, but it's the same basic recipe...even though everyone will immediately jump up and down and yell that it isn't.

I've seen many 18+ mature cadets and have run into plenty of 18+ idiot sailors, marines, etc.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on May 09, 2012, 09:32:01 PM
Parris Island. 'nuff said. Too many stories to count.

Uh Brad, we're talking CADET Encampment here, not your "I was stupid and raised my hand and signed the papers and this is what I got." trip to the Island. ;)

Different methods used because of the different maturity levels of the participants, but it's the same basic recipe...even though everyone will immediately jump up and down and yell that it isn't.

I've seen many 18+ mature cadets and have run into plenty of 18+ idiot sailors Sailors, marines Marines, etc.

FTFY!

As for differences in the two events, I've attended both, and there are many more differences than similarities. The recipe is not the same.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: bflynn on May 09, 2012, 09:49:00 PM
Parris Island. 'nuff said. Too many stories to count.

Uh Brad, we're talking CADET Encampment here, not your "I was stupid and raised my hand and signed the papers and this is what I got." trip to the Island. ;)

Different methods used because of the different maturity levels of the participants, but it's the same basic recipe...even though everyone will immediately jump up and down and yell that it isn't.

Do you have to take everything seriously?

Not at all - but I am in nature a serious and analytical person. 

I have been known from time to time to howl at the moon, but it's few and far between. 

Do you really want to have a discussion about me?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Brad on May 10, 2012, 04:01:09 AM
Parris Island. 'nuff said. Too many stories to count.

Uh Brad, we're talking CADET Encampment here, not your "I was stupid and raised my hand and signed the papers and this is what I got." trip to the Island. ;)

Different methods used because of the different maturity levels of the participants, but it's the same basic recipe...even though everyone will immediately jump up and down and yell that it isn't.

Do you have to take everything seriously?

Not at all - but I am in nature a serious and analytical person. 

I have been known from time to time to howl at the moon, but it's few and far between. 

Do you really want to have a discussion about me?

LOL! Perhaps I should have clarified...SCWG had an Encampment at Parris Island last year.

As for me, I am medically d/q'ed from the service for sleepwalking. Did about a month of NROTC before it came up. :( Part of the reason I joined CAP, gives me a sense of making good on my oath with what I have.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 11, 2012, 03:01:54 PM
So back to the thread. Any really funny current stories? Sleepwalking basics? Sleepwalking staff?  :)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: titanII on May 11, 2012, 03:30:08 PM
I recently heard that a certain staff member got locked out of his room at night, and had to spend the night sleeping in a corner of the bay, curled up in his poncho.  ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 11, 2012, 03:35:36 PM
I recently heard that a certain staff member got locked out of his room at night, and had to spend the night sleeping in a corner of the bay, curled up in his poncho.  ;D

 :o ;D :clap: So many mixed emotions. But so funny. At my encampment up at Norwich we had to have our doors open all the time except when e were changing.
One of my encampment memories...We were instructed to bring fans and the people who brought them put them in their open windows. Alpha flight across the hall from me had one of their fans fall out the window. Didn't see that coming a mile away  :P
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Perez on May 11, 2012, 10:48:16 PM
I recently heard that a certain staff member got locked out of his room at night, and had to spend the night sleeping in a corner of the bay, curled up in his poncho.  ;D

Hmm... Something very similar happened to me during Sea Cadet alert night... Except I just crashed in another staff member's room after a while. He walks in, sees me lying in his chair, and then goes to bed.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Brad on May 13, 2012, 03:58:09 AM
So back to the thread. Any really funny current stories? Sleepwalking basics? Sleepwalking staff?  :)

Sleepwalking TAC, guilty as charged. Firewatch woke me up halfway down the squadbay, "Sir, what are you doing?" I quickly came to, realized what happened and did my best to play it off, "Uhhhh, going to the bathroom." "Ok sir, well hurry up."
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 13, 2012, 01:17:49 PM
Speaking of squadbays...kind of  :). How many encampments use squad bays and how many use dorms?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on May 13, 2012, 03:31:26 PM
CAWG has been in "squad bays" for a number of years. Pretty much all that is available from the California National Guard and the Marines anymore.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spaceman3750 on May 13, 2012, 03:36:33 PM
ILWG summer uses dorms but was in bays before they changed bases.

I think ILWG spring is open bay.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ck4 on May 14, 2012, 12:22:17 AM
About my fourth night of my first encampment I had had the second shift of CQ and had just gotten back to sleep from being woken up for my shift and about 45-50 minutes into the next shift my whole flight is woken up by screaming from the front of the barracks, apparently the cadets that myself and another cadet had woken up for there shift could not get the cadet for the shift after theres to wake up or even acknowledge them, so for some reason the cadets that I had woken up put tabasco in his eyes.....My flight Sgt comes in and takes him out of the room and he quickly speaks with everyone up our chain of command to try and see if he would be dismissed. Ended up not being dismissed but had to apologize and do something else that i can not recall. But this is one of my funniest CAP memories to look back on that wasn't funny at the time when the guy was crying tabasco.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on May 14, 2012, 12:47:43 AM
What. The.

That is like... And how did he get tabasco sauce in the first place?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ck4 on May 14, 2012, 08:01:48 AM
MRE's haha
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on May 14, 2012, 08:20:50 AM
Blinding someone is funny?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ck4 on May 14, 2012, 08:51:47 AM
It won't blind you. He saw it on "Surviving the cut:Ranger School" he barely put any in there it just freaked him out when he woke up he was back to normal in 10 minutes and even pulled his CQ.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spaceman3750 on May 14, 2012, 08:54:08 AM
Yes, because TV is a great place to learn your pranks from >:(.

If I was that kid with tobasco in his eyes (or his parents), I would have had someone's butt >:(. I know for me even if it didn't do any damage to my eyes it would trash a rather expensive pair of contacts and I don't exactly carry extras in case someone does something stupid to them.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ck4 on May 14, 2012, 09:16:57 AM
I Still talk to the cadet it happened to on a regular basis and he never wanted revenge or his parents to do anything he thinks it was funny now. He doesn't wear contacts so no damage was done.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ck4 on May 14, 2012, 09:35:16 AM
It was a prank that could have gone very badly but ended up causing no harm so the people involved can now look back and laugh it wasn't funny at the moment, but it was months later looking back at our experiences together.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on May 14, 2012, 03:43:31 PM
I Still talk to the cadet it happened to on a regular basis and he never wanted revenge or his parents to do anything he thinks it was funny now. He doesn't wear contacts so no damage was done.

 Rationalizing it still doesn't make it right.  :o
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ck4 on May 14, 2012, 03:56:29 PM
No I did not mean that it was right for him to pull the prank but this is a thread for encampment stories so I told one.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on May 14, 2012, 03:57:03 PM
It was a prank that could have gone very badly but ended up causing no harm so the people involved can now look back and laugh it wasn't funny at the moment, but it was months later looking back at our experiences together.

That young man would have been waiting for mom & dad to pick him up.

The fact that no one was permanently injured doesn't change the fact that it was uncalled for and unacceptable.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 14, 2012, 04:03:24 PM
About my fourth night of my first encampment I had had the second shift of CQ and had just gotten back to sleep from being woken up for my shift and about 45-50 minutes into the next shift my whole flight is woken up by screaming from the front of the barracks, apparently the cadets that myself and another cadet had woken up for there shift could not get the cadet for the shift after theres to wake up or even acknowledge them, so for some reason the cadets that I had woken up put tabasco in his eyes.....My flight Sgt comes in and takes him out of the room and he quickly speaks with everyone up our chain of command to try and see if he would be dismissed. Ended up not being dismissed but had to apologize and do something else that i can not recall. But this is one of my funniest CAP memories to look back on that wasn't funny at the time when the guy was crying tabasco.

That would get you into so much trouble inside and outside of CAP. I can't even think of what the SMs I know would do to you for that. BTW where were the SMs?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on May 14, 2012, 04:17:15 PM
About my fourth night of my first encampment I had had the second shift of CQ and had just gotten back to sleep from being woken up for my shift and about 45-50 minutes into the next shift my whole flight is woken up by screaming from the front of the barracks, apparently the cadets that myself and another cadet had woken up for there shift could not get the cadet for the shift after theres to wake up or even acknowledge them, so for some reason the cadets that I had woken up put tabasco in his eyes.....My flight Sgt comes in and takes him out of the room and he quickly speaks with everyone up our chain of command to try and see if he would be dismissed. Ended up not being dismissed but had to apologize and do something else that i can not recall. But this is one of my funniest CAP memories to look back on that wasn't funny at the time when the guy was crying tabasco.

That would get you into so much trouble inside and outside of CAP. I can't even think of what the SMs I know would do to you for that. BTW where were the SMs?
at my encampment, I saw 3 SMs after lights out. 2 where at the showers, and one was the medical officer. And that was all week.


In short, they were sleeping.

Why did he have MREs?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 14, 2012, 04:30:06 PM
About my fourth night of my first encampment I had had the second shift of CQ and had just gotten back to sleep from being woken up for my shift and about 45-50 minutes into the next shift my whole flight is woken up by screaming from the front of the barracks, apparently the cadets that myself and another cadet had woken up for there shift could not get the cadet for the shift after theres to wake up or even acknowledge them, so for some reason the cadets that I had woken up put tabasco in his eyes.....My flight Sgt comes in and takes him out of the room and he quickly speaks with everyone up our chain of command to try and see if he would be dismissed. Ended up not being dismissed but had to apologize and do something else that i can not recall. But this is one of my funniest CAP memories to look back on that wasn't funny at the time when the guy was crying tabasco.

That would get you into so much trouble inside and outside of CAP. I can't even think of what the SMs I know would do to you for that. BTW where were the SMs?
at my encampment, I saw 3 SMs after lights out. 2 where at the showers, and one was the medical officer. And that was all week.


In short, they were sleeping.

The flight sergeant should have sent that up the chain...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on May 14, 2012, 04:51:23 PM
About my fourth night of my first encampment I had had the second shift of CQ and had just gotten back to sleep from being woken up for my shift and about 45-50 minutes into the next shift my whole flight is woken up by screaming from the front of the barracks, apparently the cadets that myself and another cadet had woken up for there shift could not get the cadet for the shift after theres to wake up or even acknowledge them, so for some reason the cadets that I had woken up put tabasco in his eyes.....My flight Sgt comes in and takes him out of the room and he quickly speaks with everyone up our chain of command to try and see if he would be dismissed. Ended up not being dismissed but had to apologize and do something else that i can not recall. But this is one of my funniest CAP memories to look back on that wasn't funny at the time when the guy was crying tabasco.

That would get you into so much trouble inside and outside of CAP. I can't even think of what the SMs I know would do to you for that. BTW where were the SMs?
at my encampment, I saw 3 SMs after lights out. 2 where at the showers, and one was the medical officer. And that was all week.


In short, they were sleeping.

The flight sergeant should have sent that up the chain...
According to the story he did.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ck4 on May 14, 2012, 04:52:21 PM
He did send him up the chain and he didn't get dismissed. We had done a LRC at the base we were at that day and had been given MRE's for lunch and I guess he saved the tobasco sauce.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PA Guy on May 14, 2012, 05:24:52 PM
Dumb, stupid prank worthy of dismissal.  I don't believe I would have told that.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ck4 on May 14, 2012, 06:00:51 PM
I wasn't the one that did it? Yea it was stupid and immature of him. But since then the person that pulled the prank has left cap and everyone else involved gets a kick out of it.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on May 14, 2012, 06:19:45 PM
I wasn't the one that did it? Yea it was stupid and immature of him. But since then the person that pulled the prank has left cap and everyone else involved gets a kick out of it.

You're missing the point - this was a dumb, dangerous thing to do and could have seriously injured a fellow cadet.  Take the lesson and
don't treat it as if it was "funny" - it wasn't.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on May 14, 2012, 08:32:11 PM
I wasn't the one that did it? Yea it was stupid and immature of him. But since then the person that pulled the prank has left cap and everyone else involved gets a kick out of it.

You're missing the point - this was a dumb, dangerous thing to do and could have seriously injured a fellow cadet.  Take the lesson and
don't treat it as if it was "funny" - it wasn't.

Ergo, don't repeat the story as if it were funny. That's one best left to rot away, out of sight and out of mind.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on May 15, 2012, 10:55:06 AM
Heh.. well, in a couple weeks, I know that if I see MRE's, I'm going to ask for the Tobasco packets to be collected, spent or not, and audited ;-)

I don't want my staff to have to deal that ... ever... now that it's out in the wild ;-)

LOL
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MSG Mac on May 15, 2012, 01:26:33 PM
It won't blind you. He saw it on "Surviving the cut:Ranger School" he barely put any in there it just freaked him out when he woke up he was back to normal in 10 minutes and even pulled his CQ.


I didn't realize we had a Board Certified Opthamologist among our cadets. Seeing something on TV doesn't justify a criminal act on and by our members.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ck4 on May 15, 2012, 05:22:48 PM
Sir,
     I never said I was a Board Certified Opthamologist. But it did not blind him and he was taken up the chain of command and they punished him accordingly. Everyone is taking this out of proportion it was a thread about stories and I told one.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: RogueLeader on May 15, 2012, 05:42:17 PM
Sir,
     I never said I was a Board Certified Opthamologist. But it did not blind him and he was taken up the chain of command and they punished him accordingly. Everyone is taking this out of proportion it was a thread about stories and I told one.

You stated that as a fact that Tabascos sauce WILL NOT blind you. I tell you that it can as I've seen it back on bragg. Just because it didn't blind him in one incident; that doesn't mean that it can't.

There are stories that are fun or cool to tell. This is not one of them. It could be the inspiration for someone that may end up permanently blinding them.

Just because some real military personnel do it, that does not mean it is ok for any use, and ABSOLUTELY NOT ok for somebody to put it in another's eyes.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: abdsp51 on May 15, 2012, 09:17:27 PM
Yep had to remove those from mre packets before giving them to detainees for that sole purpose.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: spacecadet97 on May 17, 2012, 04:07:39 PM
At KSWG Encampments, guidon stealing has been outlawed. The only way a guidon can get "snatched" is if it is left by the flight and they don't realize it, a command staff member or senior may grab it up and take it back to Wing HQ (our encampments are at Wing HQ), to sit in the encampment commander's office. It is up to the encampment commander how the flight will get their guidon back. Over the past couple couple years, they have required a letter written by the flight asking for it back and a little bit of groveling. We have also done away with singing to get misplaced items back.
Sir, I went to the KSWG Winter Encampment as a basic last year, and there was a case of guidon stealing by the staff, led by a C/2Lt (who also happened to be the Commandant's son).
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: cadetesman on May 17, 2012, 09:03:47 PM
My encampment was pretty standard. Best story I have was freaking out on the way there, about buying a new, more subdued watch, on account of the fact that I was worried I wouldn't be allowed to keep my neon green G Shock. Ended up with a 10 dollar watch. Saw plenty of people with G Shocks. A good time was had by all.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: GTCommando on May 17, 2012, 10:20:34 PM
My encampment was pretty standard. Best story I have was freaking out on the way there, about buying a new, more subdued watch, on account of the fact that I was worried I wouldn't be allowed to keep my neon green G Shock. Ended up with a 10 dollar watch. Saw plenty of people with G Shocks. A good time was had by all.

 Aw, they actually let you use watches? Not knowing what the heck your staff is going to do next is half the fun!  ;D ;)

 Anyway, a story about guidons... Last year, I attended OHWG ATS (Advanced Training Squadron). About halfway through encampment, Squadron 3 (Basic squadron) actually lost their guidon. And I mean lost, as in nobody knew where it was. So, our ATS Commander decided to make them a new one...out of duct tape and ballpoint pens.  ;D We made the actual pennant entirely out of duct tape, and the staff was comprised of twisted duct tape, empty ballpoint pens, tent stakes, and anything else we could find. Then our more artistic cadets wrote out the letter/number designations, along with some *cough* motivational graphics *cough*. We then proceeded to present the guidon to the Squadron 3 Commander, who was a tad flustered, to say the least. However, they treated that guidon like their own for the rest of the week, though it did sag a bit when performing Present Arms...  ;) ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: titanII on May 17, 2012, 10:24:02 PM
Aw, they actually let you use watches? Not knowing what the heck your staff is going to do next is half the fun!  ;D ;)
Yeah, they didn't let us basics have watches at last summer's MAWG Encampment.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on May 18, 2012, 01:00:58 AM
"not knowing if you could keep it"?

Was it on the list? If not, it goes in a bag, or something, and you get it back when you leave. Unless it's food, they usually eat that. ;)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eagle on May 18, 2012, 01:47:46 AM
On the topic of the Tobasco sauce, I'm good friends with the Alpha Flight sergeant from the AL/MS 2011 encampment, and the Encampment Commandant, and I'm pretty sure the Tobasco was put on the cadet's mouth, not his eyes. Knowing the commandant, if the cadet had put the sauce in the victim's eyes, he would have been dismissed.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 18, 2012, 05:04:27 PM
My encampment was pretty standard. Best story I have was freaking out on the way there, about buying a new, more subdued watch, on account of the fact that I was worried I wouldn't be allowed to keep my neon green G Shock. Ended up with a 10 dollar watch. Saw plenty of people with G Shocks. A good time was had by all.

Having a watch is no fun. When I was at my basic encampment the closest I got to knowing the time was the clock in the cafeteria. Anybody else here going to be a flight sergeant at their next encampment?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on May 18, 2012, 05:19:44 PM
On the topic of the Tobasco sauce, I'm good friends with the Alpha Flight sergeant from the AL/MS 2011 encampment, and the Encampment Commandant, and I'm pretty sure the Tobasco was put on the cadet's mouth, not his eyes. Knowing the commandant, if the cadet had put the sauce in the victim's eyes, he would have been dismissed.

Excellent, so instead of blinding him, he might have aspirated it, or vomited all over himself and his rack - so much better.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on May 18, 2012, 06:01:09 PM
My encampment was pretty standard. Best story I have was freaking out on the way there, about buying a new, more subdued watch, on account of the fact that I was worried I wouldn't be allowed to keep my neon green G Shock. Ended up with a 10 dollar watch. Saw plenty of people with G Shocks. A good time was had by all.
You forgot the part where staff gave us candy...  >:D

Quote
Anybody else here going to be a flight sergeant at their next encampment?
I applied to be. Why?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 18, 2012, 06:02:52 PM
I applied to be. Why?
Just wondering. I'm slotted as Echo flight sergeant for the joint New Hampshire Vermont Wing encampment.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Sgt. Papa on May 19, 2012, 08:06:21 PM
Cashboy, ME TOO! Echo Flight Sergeant of Massachusetts Wing Summer Encampment
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 19, 2012, 08:45:36 PM
Cashboy, ME TOO! Echo Flight Sergeant of Massachusetts Wing Summer Encampment
Come up with any good sounding names for echo flight that start with E? Nothing sounds good with E I'm telling you.  :'(

Best I've come up with is Eagles. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on May 19, 2012, 10:00:50 PM
Cashboy, ME TOO! Echo Flight Sergeant of Massachusetts Wing Summer Encampment
Come up with any good sounding names for echo flight that start with E? Nothing sounds good with E I'm telling you.  :'(

Best I've come up with is Eagles.
Elephants. Elephants own all. They are pretty BA.

earthworms, earwigs, eyewitness, eavesdroppers, ebullience, eelworms, eels, eggs. Psst: http://www.scrabblelookup.com/word/portion/search/e (http://www.scrabblelookup.com/word/portion/search/e)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 19, 2012, 11:00:51 PM
Cashboy, ME TOO! Echo Flight Sergeant of Massachusetts Wing Summer Encampment
Come up with any good sounding names for echo flight that start with E? Nothing sounds good with E I'm telling you.  :'(

Best I've come up with is Eagles.
Elephants. Elephants own all. They are pretty BA.

earthworms, earwigs, eyewitness, eavesdroppers, ebullience, eelworms, eels, eggs. Psst: http://www.scrabblelookup.com/word/portion/search/e (http://www.scrabblelookup.com/word/portion/search/e)
Echo eels? Echo Earthworms? I think Echo Eardrops would go over well...But the elephant on a giudon might go over well. But I like Echo Electricity.  8)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: RogueLeader on May 19, 2012, 11:59:46 PM
Evil Echo?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: crisptheyounger on May 20, 2012, 01:32:18 AM
Echo Echo  8)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 20, 2012, 09:29:38 AM
Echo Echo  8)
I'll yell Echo Flight and they will yell back, "Echo!"  8)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Sgt. Papa on May 20, 2012, 05:03:09 PM
Echo Exterminators
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 20, 2012, 07:25:09 PM
Echo Exterminators
Oh I like that! But I'm still going to use that Echo Echo thing.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on May 20, 2012, 10:47:13 PM
Echo Exterminators
Oh I like that! But I'm still going to use that Echo Echo thing.

How about showing a bit of initive and maybe a little imagination and coming up with something new?

Anybody can use something that has been around forever...  Prove you're better then that!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Cool Mace on May 22, 2012, 03:28:40 PM

How about showing a bit of initive and maybe a little imagination and coming up with something new?

Anybody can use something that has been around forever...  Prove you're better then that!
[/quote]

Echo Eagles, or Echo Excaliburs.

Ok, Eagles aren't really new, but Excalibur is!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Cool Mace on May 22, 2012, 03:30:54 PM

How about showing a bit of initive and maybe a little imagination and coming up with something new?

Anybody can use something that has been around forever...  Prove you're better then that!

Echo Eagles, or Echo Excaliburs.

Ok, Eagles aren't really new, but Excalibur is!
[/quote]

Tried to fix the quote, but it wouldn't let me...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on May 22, 2012, 03:44:56 PM
I'll put a nice sword in a rock on the guidon :)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Equinox on June 25, 2012, 09:50:01 PM
Alpha Avengers
Bravo Boomerangs
Charlie Copperheads
Delta Dragons
Echo Eradicators
Foxtrot Firebirds
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on June 26, 2012, 12:05:00 PM
Any brand new encampment stories yet? I know that Pennsylvania, Arizona, Oklahoma and Ohio Wings have already had their summer encampments.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: krnlpanick on June 26, 2012, 12:24:24 PM
I am not currently there, but Colorado is having their encampment this week with a Forest Fire right down the road. I imagine that will generate some stories.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: NC Hokie on June 26, 2012, 12:50:45 PM
Not my story, but a group of cadets at the NC Wing encampment last week were practicing air to ground communications and setting up a helicopter landing zone when a NCNG Apache decided to accept their offer!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on June 26, 2012, 12:53:16 PM
LOL :)

In some instances, a story like that would lead to an "Ooooooh sh**!!!!! - we're in trouble!!!!! - run!!" moment.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on June 26, 2012, 12:56:38 PM
I am not currently there, but Colorado is having their encampment this week with a Forest Fire right down the road. I imagine that will generate some stories.
I can see the safety briefings now.

Not my story, but a group of cadets at the NC Wing encampment last week were practicing air to ground communications and setting up a helicopter landing zone when a NCNG Apache decided to accept their offer!
That is a unique story for sure.  :clap: It actually landed?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on June 26, 2012, 12:58:32 PM
Hawaii ended about 15 days ago, too. :) But I'll let someone else share stories.. for the moment..
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: NC Hokie on June 26, 2012, 01:08:40 PM
Not my story, but a group of cadets at the NC Wing encampment last week were practicing air to ground communications and setting up a helicopter landing zone when a NCNG Apache decided to accept their offer!
That is a unique story for sure.  :clap: It actually landed?
Yep, there are photos and a video on the NCWG 2012 Encampment Facebook page. Can't access Facebook from work to send a link, but I'm sure you can find it!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on June 26, 2012, 08:10:59 PM

How about showing a bit of initive and maybe a little imagination and coming up with something new?

Anybody can use something that has been around forever...  Prove you're better then that!

Echo Eagles, or Echo Excaliburs.

Ok, Eagles aren't really new, but Excalibur is!


[/quote]Some years ago at encampment we had a squadron commander for Echo that wanted his cadets to call it "Psycho Echo". So the cadets were going around saying "Psycho....Echo". The squadron commander was also a cadet at the Citadel. Encampment started on Saturday and this "id...individual" was hoarse by Sunday evening from screaming so much. Some of us seniors started calling him "Semper Psycho".
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Cap'n on June 27, 2012, 02:48:38 PM
Well, I have a story to tell.

As mentioned earlier, Colorado is currently in a very big crisis right now because of a span of fires throughout Fort Collins, USAFA, Colorado Springs, Black Forest/Monument, etc. I live in the middle of all of that next to the USAFA. While my home has yet to be evacuated (we may be soon- already in pre-evacutaion with plans on where to go and already packed), we have taken in one family, and can be expecting more soon. Some good friends of mine have already had their houses burned down, while some have been stated that they will catch fire before the end of the day. It's safe to say it's pretty bad up here.

Some of you may know the COWG Encampment was going on at the USAFA Prep School from June 23-30. We went through the first few days fine. Or at least, as fine as it gets by the fourth day for a Basic. We were finally working together as not just a flight, but a squadron, we had gotten Honor Flight, our SOP memory work had become a tons better, and we were finally at the point where the last days to come would be frankly, a lot better.

Monday morning, it was announced that we were going to pack a bag of a set of PT gear, a toothbrush, and toothpaste to keep in our dorms if anything happened. We all could see and smell the smoke a little by then, so no one asked too many questions. Now Tuesday. Tuesday morning we woke up, and put on PT gear like always, just to be told we couldn't go out and do PT because of the smoke. While that was a bonus for some people, it created a somewhat nervous tension through out the dorms of the Basics. We didn't have phones, iPod, TV, or internet to tell us what was going on in the slightest. All we saw was the smoke outside.

The rest of the morning went smoothly, and then the afternoon. Until we got to dinner. It was around 1800, and while we were waiting in line to eat, the staff informed us that we were in a Pr-evacuation plan. We would have to eat fast, and head back to USAFA (we were on Peterson AFB for classes) and we would go from there. It didn't exactly work out that way. While I don't know all of the details at the point, we were sent to a room in the COWG HQ. There, they split the basics up to fit as many as they could in each room to wait, which we did for about 2 hours. The RMR commander was there, as well as the COWG Commander, while we got to meet and talk to the first. Then the DC came in and told us we had to call our parents, and they got a list of all of our names. Later on, they had to move us to the theater on Peterson, since we would be staying the night there. No one was allowed on USAFA. We got outside to do a head count before getting on buses. Lots of cadets had to keep their shirts over their mouths because of the smoke.

We got onto a bus, and the staff made a big attempt to calm everyone down by singing jodies, which worked. A few of the younger cadets got very upset, and had to be sent to Medical, and it seemed everyone was frazzled. Many didn't know if their houses were evacuated, burned down, or what was going on at home, and with so many parents to call, a few people like myself had to wait 4-6 hours afterward to talk to our parents to see what situation we were in. We ended up being moved to a large room on base, where everyone hung out at table with their squadron for an hour or two, trying to pass the time while the Staff planned.

After that, we were sent outside in formation, where they had us sit, gave us a little food and water, and let us talk at At Rest. We were there for maybe an hour and a half, and then had to get onto buses to the theater. We were then told the encampment was done, and they answered a ton of questions. We would be staying the night in the theater if we had to, and parents would be contacted to come pick us up when they could at first notice.

While at the theater, cars with our luggage came and we helped move everything inside. Some luggage will not be coming until today, so some cadets did not get their stuff. I myself did not get a smaller bag (the evacuation bag) with my sweatpants and sweatshirt, etc, which is obviously not a big deal compared at all to what some cadets couldn't get of theirs. We officially signed and In-Processed out in the theater, while we splitted between groups of people who were spending the night, and who was going home before 2400. I left with a friend around Midnight, and we said good-bye to our friends, staff, and the Encampment four days early.

From what I understand, the AFB brought cots, food, blankets, and other necessities for the over-nighters, and that most, if not all, or home now.

As I said, I don't know every single detail. But if you're curious and have questions, I may be able to answer some.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on June 27, 2012, 02:53:59 PM
Hope this event won't became a huge tragedy (in human cost, not money), but in the end this may be the most memorable encampment ever. Any idea as to what will be done regarding Encampment Credit?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on June 27, 2012, 03:05:07 PM
Well, there's a non-negotiable set of curriculum hours that have to be met, but whether and how they are met is up to the State Director with input from the Wing CC, Wing DCP, and Encampment CC, there's also the 80% rule for situations like these.

Past that there are some challenging issues of finance.  It would certainly be reasonable for parents to request at least a partial refund, especially if
the cadets don't ultimately get credit, however depending on what kind of up-front costs this one might have, there may not be any more to
return.  The average encampment has a budget that is about 1/3 to 1/2 the average operating budget of an entire wing.

Since this is at the USAFA and Petersen, one could assume there's no billeting costs and meals are in a galley at non-surcharged prices, but maybe not.
Meals not eaten are checks not written, but coins, shirts, office supplies, etc., are likely sitting in containers or already distributed.
Some encampments have to pre-buy all the food, or bring in catering companies, and in those cases, the money is spent.

Makes you wonder if there's any value in larger activities like these getting performance bonds.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Cap'n on June 27, 2012, 03:06:53 PM
They talked to the National Commander, and said at this point it will count as Encampment credit, since it was an entire shutdown of the Encampment, and because we finished over half.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on June 27, 2012, 03:08:37 PM
The 80% rule is exactly what I was thinking about. Especially given that Summer Encampments are more "relaxed" on fulfilling the requirements when compared to Winter/Spring/Fall events.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Cap'n on June 27, 2012, 03:29:54 PM
That was the major issue, but from what I understand since this was a very unusual circumstance, he waived it. Which is why if something happens and it doesn't end up counting as a Basic Encampment, they will do what they can to make up the coursework so people can finish the credit. More to come on that, but currently it is counting as credit.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on June 27, 2012, 04:00:43 PM
Best of luck to you and your family. But that will probably be the most memorable experience that you will have in CAP. CAP must be having a busy week out there in RMR and I hope it get resolved soon.


P.S. Congrats on getting your Wright Brothers! A ray of sunshine in this week for you.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Cap'n on June 27, 2012, 04:05:51 PM
Thank you, and yes, we are...But the entire city is pitching in to create places to stay for the evacuated families, and making sure they get food, clothes, etc, and also working to help put out the fires in any way that can.

And thank you! It just got put in today.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on June 27, 2012, 06:13:42 PM
Can the national commander do that?  ???
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Cap'n on June 27, 2012, 06:34:50 PM
Apparently; I just received a thorough confirmation from my unit commander clarifying the encampment did count, and every basic that attended is good to go.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on June 27, 2012, 06:40:11 PM
It's just a database, and a letter of justification along side a CAPF 20 / Encampment Report, and.. that's it. I'm quite sure that given the circumstances, if Florida were sinking and they had to cancel your event, you'd be taken care of, too.

...and pissant it is, too. What's most important here? That people are evacuated safely, first. Credit for time served? Great, do they have to? No. Given the circumstances, what does it hurt? Many times there are plans based on an encampment completion and with them only being offered annually, roughly...

I'm sure there will be follow up, and those who make the next step to staff an encampment or similar activity will be just fine.  50-60%.. and all the adventure with things above and beyond anyones control..

I'll tell you one thing. Credit for a class is the last thing on my mind, when I've looked outside and seen fire on the ridge line, and the skies have been dropping ash and smoked over for several days.  BTDT, not fun.

Makes a sugarcane fire look like a kid playing with matches. That's what we get to face living out west.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on June 27, 2012, 07:10:02 PM
I wasn't saying the encampment shouldn't be cancelled, or the cadet shouldn't be given credit.

I was just surprised the National commander could (seemingly) make a decision that goes again regulations... (80% rule and all)

Stay safe "out west" people
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on June 27, 2012, 07:16:13 PM
I wasn't saying the encampment shouldn't be cancelled, or the cadet shouldn't be given credit.

I was just surprised the National commander could (seemingly) make a decision that goes again regulations... (80% rule and all)

Stay safe "out west" people
EP it doesn't really matter. COWG members have their homes on the line or gone and you are worried about going against regulations?

Edit: Just remembered one story of my basic. When we had a fire drill at encampment in the middle of the night I kept wondering why my roommate was wearing different footwear than he usually did. After we got back in I realized I had put on his sneakers instead of mine which explained a lot  ::)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MajorPayne on July 01, 2012, 12:26:49 AM
 At my encampment, we were forming up outside of our barracks to get ready to go the the last day banquet when a cadet in my flight walks over and gets into the formation. His flight cap is completely off center and is tilted to far the the side. The first sgt says, "Harkins... world war two is over, put you cover on strait". The whole flight including myself got a nice chuckle.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: COL Land on July 01, 2012, 12:43:45 AM
We have an Army Cadet - the son of a soldier - whose family has lost everything...house and all contents.  The recruit does not know that yet, at the request of his parents.   

We will be keeping him here on scholarship through to the end of the summer, and may even be keeping him for Forest Hill Military Academy (http://www.goforesthill.com), which opens in August.   

It's a difficult time for many right now. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on July 01, 2012, 01:43:50 AM
On a lighter note, California Wing graduated 213 basic cadets from their Encampment today at Camp San Luis Obispo, California.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MajorPayne on July 01, 2012, 01:48:35 AM
On a lighter note, California Wing graduated 213 basic cadets from their Encampment today at Camp San Luis Obispo, California.
I was one of those 213 in California Wing
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on July 01, 2012, 02:31:57 AM
I just remembered this one.

My basic encampment I arrived exactly at the opening of inprocessing (first guy through). So I go through the check in process, contraband, etc. I walk out to my flight's guidon, and the line staff make me stand there. At attention. For 3 hours. No one else in my flight showed up during the 2 hour check in window. They didn't want to bring only one cadet over to the barracks.

Doesn't help it was freezing cold (winter encampment).

The line staff had fun asking me questions because I was "louder than all the other flights."

And I missed PT while I was standing there...  :'(
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Nor'easter on July 02, 2012, 05:57:03 PM
(http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/575750_316231318471799_384117286_n.jpg)

EDIT: Okay, okay guys! ...Just reposted from the "CAP Memes" Facebook page.  ::)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on July 02, 2012, 06:36:35 PM
Um...yeah.

An encampment SE's sole responsibility in a matter like this is knowing where the exits are and advising the commander when the activity should be
moved or shut down.

In this case, Logisitics and Admin had a much longer week than Safety.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on July 02, 2012, 07:20:06 PM
It's "safety".
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on July 02, 2012, 08:34:12 PM
He's from NJ. He can't help it.  >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Nor'easter on July 02, 2012, 11:20:38 PM
He's from NJ. He can't help it.  >:D

See what you did there, right?  >:D <-- Jersey Devil? No? Haha

PS: See my earlier edit.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on July 02, 2012, 11:34:47 PM
http://quickmeme.com/meme/3py7k8 (http://quickmeme.com/meme/3py7k8)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Haughey on July 05, 2012, 09:12:27 PM
This one time, at encampment... :P


A C/Officer saw a Florida Panther and decided to chase it!!     Best safety briefing I've ever heard the next morning  ;D



FLWG Winter Encampment, 2011-12
Foxtrot Flight Guidon
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on July 05, 2012, 10:10:12 PM
What day was this? I never heard about this...  ???
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Haughey on July 05, 2012, 11:13:42 PM
Sir, (not seeing any info in your sig, assuming you're a "sir") as a basic, they get mixed up.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on July 05, 2012, 11:45:16 PM
Extremeprejudice is not a sir.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on July 06, 2012, 12:18:00 AM
Sir, (not seeing any info in your sig, assuming you're a "sir") as a basic, they get mixed up.
That was my basic encampment...  :D

Extremeprejudice is not a sir.
I will [hopefully...  ::)] be one by the time winter rolls around.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MSG Mac on July 06, 2012, 10:26:24 AM
Almost as stupid as seeing several Navy Officers trying to coax a gator out of the water at NAS Jax.
This one time, at encampment... :P


A C/Officer saw a Florida Panther and decided to chase it!!     Best safety briefing I've ever heard the next morning  ;D



FLWG Winter Encampment, 2011-12
Foxtrot Flight Guidon
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on July 06, 2012, 02:23:22 PM
Almost as stupid as seeing several Navy Officers trying to coax a gator out of the water at NAS Jax.
This one time, at encampment... :P


A C/Officer saw a Florida Panther and decided to chase it!!     Best safety briefing I've ever heard the next morning  ;D



FLWG Winter Encampment, 2011-12
Foxtrot Flight Guidon

Meh. Little gators are fun. We had in the lake behind work (Jax), and we'd mess with it. It like most of the food we threw out at it, but did NOT like banana peels. The animal control folks came out after a couple of days and took it away.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Haughey on July 06, 2012, 02:33:26 PM
Better safe than sorry when it comes to using the "sir" title  ;D

And it was about half way through... You could have had morning KP.

And, alas, there will be no encampment stories coming from me this summer. :(
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on July 06, 2012, 02:54:07 PM
Ahh, we did have morning KP midway through.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MSG Mac on July 06, 2012, 03:29:07 PM
Almost as stupid as seeing several Navy Officers trying to coax a gator out of the water at NAS Jax.
This one time, at encampment... :P


A C/Officer saw a Florida Panther and decided to chase it!!     Best safety briefing I've ever heard the next morning  ;D





FLWG Winter Encampment, 2011-12
Foxtrot Flight Guidon

Meh. Little gators are fun. We had in the lake behind work (Jax), and we'd mess with it. It like most of the food we threw out at it, but did NOT like banana peels. The animal control folks came out after a couple of days and took it away.

The junior bird(brain)men stopped when I volunteered to make witness statements for their Line of Duty investigations.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: CadetColonelToBe on July 19, 2012, 09:38:24 AM
I went to encampment as a basic with my brother who was on staff this year. It was the last day of encampment. We were leaving for pass and review, my buddy was moving really slow. When they were finally done. I apparently was moving too fast out the door for them to see where I was going. Cause I had to go back and look for them. I found them looking for me thinking she left me in the barracks... that's not the worst part I found my flight lining up to get in vans to leave. I end up being second to last person in line, then they only had room for one more person... they gave it to the person behind me cause apparently he was on color guard and more important than me. I ended up riding in a van with staff and my brother was sitting in front of me. Everyone behind him (besides me cause I was a basic) was poking him and he kept blaming me.  >:(
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Danger on July 19, 2012, 05:17:32 PM
I have a funny story,

Day 7, final inspection prep is over. And we're lining up at the bunks, about to stand at parade rest and read SOPs until the inspection team comes in. As they tell us to do that, we all do. The cadet next to me put his flight cap on BACKWARDS.

Unfortunate for him, but it was pretty funny. Luckily our flight commander gave us 10sec to make sure covers were worn properly before the inspection.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on July 19, 2012, 05:55:45 PM
My first encampment as a TAC officer at Volk ANGB, Wisconsin, 1994. We were shaking down the cadet staff prior to the arrival of the corps. We'd found some semi-illegal items like a 8-cell Maglite and various other items that could be used as implements of destruction, when we came across a pair of stiff-looking BDU pants. I pulled them out and out fell a large Super Soaker. I looked at the cadet, he looked at me. I shook my head and kept going.
After I finished, I met up with another TAC and told him what I found. He said "Give it here," and we went to see the commander. He held it behind his back and said "We got a problem. LT Estes found a gun in one of the cadet's bags."
The commander turned white as a sheet. The TAC whipped the soaker from behind his back and the commander went under the desk, while the rest of the room started cackling. Later, this same commander almost had a heart attack after we visited a bombing range. The TAC asked one of the range instructors if he could have one of the blue practice bombs that were laying around the field. The RSI said sure, let me make sure this thing ain't gonna go off, and tossed it up in the air and let it hit the ground. The TAC wanted to give it as a present to the commander and from what I heard, when it was presented, the commander did another duck and cover when the TAC threw it at him. I don't think the commander stayed in CAP for much longer...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on July 19, 2012, 08:15:41 PM
After I finished, I met up with another TAC and told him what I found. He said "Give it here," and we went to see the commander. He held it behind his back and said "We got a problem. LT Estes found a gun in one of the cadet's bags."
The commander turned white as a sheet. The TAC whipped the soaker from behind his back and the commander went under the desk, while the rest of the room started cackling.

Seen a similar incident, except it was a ziplock of Goldbond.  >:D :angel:
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 21, 2012, 10:12:32 PM
Me being me, I have a terrible problem with forgetting things, first day I lost my SOP twice, left my cap in the barracks Etc. It was the same for the next few days. And they threatened to para cord my cover to my BDU's. I forgot my cover one more time. Got motivational pt, a good yelling and it was over. My flight went back to the barracks, I walked to my bunk. The room was called to attention suddenly. Down walks the Squadron Commander, straight to my bunk...... holding a duct tape purse. I immediately knew it was for me. I was required to march with it, do inspection with it, I even had to post it. XD I never forgot another thing.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on July 21, 2012, 11:51:57 PM
Me being me, I have a terrible problem with forgetting things, first day I lost my SOP twice, left my cap in the barracks Etc. It was the same for the next few days. And they threatened to para cord my cover to my BDU's. I forgot my cover one more time. Got motivational pt, a good yelling and it was over. My flight went back to the barracks, I walked to my bunk. The room was called to attention suddenly. Down walks the Squadron Commander, straight to my bunk...... holding a duct tape purse. I immediately knew it was for me. I was required to march with it, do inspection with it, I even had to post it. XD I never forgot another thing.
\

Sounds like your staff didn't pay much attention at RST...
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 21, 2012, 11:52:33 PM
Me being me, I have a terrible problem with forgetting things, first day I lost my SOP twice, left my cap in the barracks Etc. It was the same for the next few days. And they threatened to para cord my cover to my BDU's. I forgot my cover one more time. Got motivational pt, a good yelling and it was over. My flight went back to the barracks, I walked to my bunk. The room was called to attention suddenly. Down walks the Squadron Commander, straight to my bunk...... holding a duct tape purse. I immediately knew it was for me. I was required to march with it, do inspection with it, I even had to post it. XD I never forgot another thing.

Sounds like your staff didn't pay much attention at RST...
What do you mean?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on July 22, 2012, 12:00:07 AM
Me being me, I have a terrible problem with forgetting things, first day I lost my SOP twice, left my cap in the barracks Etc. It was the same for the next few days. And they threatened to para cord my cover to my BDU's. I forgot my cover one more time. Got motivational pt, a good yelling and it was over. My flight went back to the barracks, I walked to my bunk. The room was called to attention suddenly. Down walks the Squadron Commander, straight to my bunk...... holding a duct tape purse. I immediately knew it was for me. I was required to march with it, do inspection with it, I even had to post it. XD I never forgot another thing.

Sounds like your staff didn't pay much attention at RST...
What do you mean?

Motivational PT, A good yelling, and duct tape purse are something forbidden and covered at Required Staff Training.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on July 22, 2012, 12:48:01 AM
Me being me, I have a terrible problem with forgetting things, first day I lost my SOP twice, left my cap in the barracks Etc. It was the same for the next few days. And they threatened to para cord my cover to my BDU's. I forgot my cover one more time. Got motivational pt, a good yelling and it was over. My flight went back to the barracks, I walked to my bunk. The room was called to attention suddenly. Down walks the Squadron Commander, straight to my bunk...... holding a duct tape purse. I immediately knew it was for me. I was required to march with it, do inspection with it, I even had to post it. XD I never forgot another thing.

Sounds like your staff didn't pay much attention at RST...
What do you mean?

Motivational PT, A good yelling, and duct tape purse are something forbidden and covered at Required Staff Training.

better than the pink boot we had to carry...it started in our squadron (late 70s, early 80s) for the squad that got the most demerits in a month. We had to carry it EVERYWHERE we went except Wing activities. Then, someone got wise and started the tradition (which didn't last long) at encampment for the worst flight. They had to tie it to their guidon for the day. I forget what the circumstances were regarding its demise in both the squadron and encampment but I have a feeling someone's little feelers got hurt and said something to someone, who told two friends, who told two friends and so on and so on...

Any sort of "motivational" or "corrective" activities such as extra PT or yelling or such is considered hazing and is against CPPT. I just received an email from the encampment commander saying that the demerit slips we used to use were forbidden from now on. Seems that any sort of singling out for punishment or correction is becoming verboten nowadays.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 01:22:43 AM
I didn't care, I needed to work on my pushups. Haha. And I totally deserved it, it made a good laugh too. I think personally they're going a bit overboard with that whole thing, there's a line between discipline and hazing, that was discipline, it was done to help me remember things.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on July 22, 2012, 03:16:17 AM
I didn't care, I needed to work on my pushups. Haha. And I totally deserved it, it made a good laugh too. I think personally they're going a bit overboard with that whole thing, there's a line between discipline and hazing, that was discipline, it was done to help me remember things.

How does carrying a duct-tape purse, getting yelled at, or doing pushups help you remember things? It doesn't. It instills a fear of doing wrong, and is thus hazing.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 09:46:03 AM
IMHO, with all due respect, it isn't hazing, it's discipline, when I'm about to forget to check for everything the thing that pops onto my mind is "hey, I gotta make sure I got everything I need before I leave" I did that for the rest of the week after that, it didn't instill fear, I just knew that I needed to remember things for a reason. My dad yells at me, and I used to receive spankings when I did something wrong, and it was all for the better, I would be nowhere near what I am today of it wouldn't of been for him disciplining me. I would be a total wild child, cause I was not an easy one to break.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 09:55:10 AM
If it happened to me and I have no problem with it, then it's not hazing. It didn't screw me up mentally or anything.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Haughey on July 22, 2012, 10:46:14 AM
If it happened to me and I have no problem with it, then it's not hazing. It didn't screw me up mentally or anything.

You can't speak for every other cadet in your flight/squadron/etc.

What some people consider hazing, *I*, would not considered hazing, but I've had them done to me and later had a good laugh about it. NHQ outlines what the *official* definition of hazing is so that it is standardized and keeps everyone safe.

No one wants 10 or 12 year old C/AB Johnny running home today telling daddy about a meany First Sergeant who made him to push-ups, when daddy is a lawyer...
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 11:18:13 AM
That is true. Sadly in today's society people feel the need to go around suing everyone. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on July 22, 2012, 11:49:50 AM
If it happened to me and I have no problem with it, then it's not hazing. It didn't screw me up mentally or anything.


CAPR 52-10 says..."c. Hazing. Hazing is defined as any conduct whereby someone causes another to suffer or to be exposed to any activity that is cruel, abusive, humiliating, oppressive, demeaning, or harmful. Actual or implied consent to acts of hazing does not eliminate the culpability of the perpetrator. Examples of hazing include using exercise as punishment or assigning remedial training that does not fit the deficiency (such as making a cadet run laps for having poorly shined shoes). Hazing, as defined in this policy, is considered a form of physical abuse and the reporting procedures for physical abuse must be followed."

Unfortunately your viewpoint isn't shared by the other cadet(s) who may feel intimidated or threatened by someone (s)he barely knows who is bigger and higher ranking than him/her yelling at or singling him/her out. This is why we have CPPT, to protect you youngins from not only us, but yourselves. Cadets who reach the magical age of 18 are required to take CPPT.

Parents are so quick to judge and sue because of things they don't understand. All they would know is that Johnny or Janie was yelled at for having unshined shoes or forgetting their hat, and "how dare they subject my child to that sort of treatment! Where do we keep the lawyer's card?"
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on July 22, 2012, 12:01:01 PM
If it happened to me and I have no problem with it, then it's not hazing.

Thankfully, since there is no such thing as anonymity on the internet, this is likely already being addressed with those in your wing.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 01:42:06 PM
Huh? I don't want to get anyone in trouble for it, I had a great time at encampment. I didn't care. They've helped me with remembering things outside of CAP, I now always do a mental checklist of things I need, as a result of encampment. And it was nothing extreme.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 01:47:04 PM
Just a side note, it was group motivational pt, not just me. If that's what you thought I meant.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on July 22, 2012, 02:15:05 PM
Just a side note, it was group motivational pt, not just me. If that's what you thought I meant.

It's still illegal. The 52-10 is pretty straight forward on this. It's not allowed, ever.

This is why we have to complete RST every year at encampment. Because some people just still don't get it... >:(
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on July 22, 2012, 02:17:40 PM
Your ratialization of it doesn't make it OK. YOU may have been OK with it, but C/Amn Smith in your flight may have then gone home and quit CAP because it affected them as well. The point is that what you described would have had me in deep water had I done something like that at encampment in IL. There are dozens of better ways to deal with something like this. Singling you out with a duct tape purse is not it.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 02:23:23 PM
I thought CAP was meant to prepare you for the military, how is no motivational pt or discipline preparing you for the military?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on July 22, 2012, 02:25:54 PM
I thought CAP was meant to prepare you for the military, how is no motivational pt or discipline preparing you for the military?
No. CAP isn't meant to prepare you for the military. Encampment isn't BMT. Nor should it be. 

Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 02:26:17 PM
It makes you no better as a cadet.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: JayT on July 22, 2012, 02:26:33 PM
I thought CAP was meant to prepare you for the military, how is no motivational pt or discipline preparing you for the military?

CAP is not meant to prepare you for the military. A sixteen year old Cadet Staff Sergeant or a senior member who works at Walmart and has spent six months in CAP don't have the training or background to provide 'motivational' PT or Basic Training style discipline. 
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 02:27:49 PM
Then what's the point of encampment? I thought it was to discipline you into a better cadet.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: JayT on July 22, 2012, 02:29:10 PM
Then what's the point of encampment? I thought it was to discipline you into a better cadet.

What does discipline mean to you? Discipline in the real world does not mean push ups, or duct tape purse or what not. Encampment was suppose to help you grow as a cadet and a leader.

If I'm late to work, I don't get dropped for push ups. I get a warning. If it happens multiple times, then consequences happen (like losing my job.) However, if I make a mistake related to patient care, then the consequences involve education and consoling so that it won't happen again.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 02:36:49 PM
Discipline to me is any form of punishment that will cause me to remember things, and to cause me to want to do better than the bare minimum. Anything that makes me better at what I do.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on July 22, 2012, 02:46:33 PM
Discipline to me is any form of punishment that will cause me to remember things, and to cause me to want to do better than the bare minimum. Anything that makes me better at what I do.
The first and best definition of "discipline" is training. That's is what you should have received instead of "punishment". If I train someone right, make them practice it enough that it becomes second nature, and instills in them the desire to get it right without being told to do so every time, THAT is DISCIPLINE.

If I punish somebody every time they get something wrong, I will teach them to do just enough not to get punished. That is NOT discipline.

As for discipline vs. hazing we have had that discussion on many other threads. In less than one week, I will be heading out to encampment #18. In those 18 encampments, I have learned that punishment and hazing have no place at one.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on July 22, 2012, 02:46:55 PM
Discipline to me is any form of punishment that will cause me to remember things, and to cause me to want to do better than the bare minimum. Anything that makes me better at what I do.

No. You can accomplish the same thing by learning why you need to do things properly or at all. I'd say you would do well at Marine Corps boot camp or Hell Week at the Citadel or West Point. Yelling at someone who forgets his hat or making the cadet do push-ups because he forgot what the cadet oath is accomplishes nothing. You said it didn't bother you, and that means that the "motivational" aspect of the "punishment" has failed. Having to dole out punishment means the parent or leader or manager has failed.

Our job is not to break you down in order to mold you into something else. That's what Plebe year and basic training are for.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on July 22, 2012, 03:11:30 PM
Huh? I don't want to get anyone in trouble for it...

Then don't wander onto the internet telling tales, especially recent ones, that indicate staff at an activity
broke several tenets and regulations regarding the cadet program.

CAP is very clear as to what is, and what isn't allowed.  Punitive PT, even when described as "motivational" is 100% prohibited, and
the other things you mention could well be interpreted as hazing.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PA Guy on July 22, 2012, 06:32:06 PM
Mavvrikk,

Discipline does not equal punishment.  Take the time to go online and research it.

Also go online to the CAP website and look up the following regulations:  CAPR  chap. 9 para. 1a and CAPR 52-16 chap. 1 para. 6c2.

Do your homework and you will be miles ahead of many of your counterparts who are too lazy to look anything up.  Gee, that could be a lesson in discipline itself.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Mavvrikk on July 22, 2012, 08:22:18 PM
Alright, will do!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on July 25, 2012, 09:36:07 PM
Not really an encampment story. It is a NCSA story...


Our SA (Senior Advisor) (He was a police officer for 32+ years) told us (the flight) to grab our blankets and put them over our heads as a meager amount of protection in case of a fire/fire alarm.

So one morning (I think... it is kinda a blur now...) the fire alarm goes off. So we all grab our blankets and head down stairs and meet up at our designated meeting location.

Well, we all had white blankets.... And we looked like a bunch of Klan members.

So we got in trouble for that.

Then, one night during showers a fire alarm goes off, (Our SA told us before this to get our towels, because well they didn't say no towels!) so we grab our towels and go to our designated area (after we were all accounted for we moved to a common location with everyone else at the NCSA).

We overheard the executive staff saying "this isn't a drill." So our flight starts to panic, since it went off on our floor first, what did we leave on??? Well, the fire dept. comes and clears the building and we went up to our floor and immediately checked all the irons.

Safe.....

WRONG -- the fire alarm goes off again. Starting at our floor.

SOOOO we run outside again, the fire dept. comes out again, and every time they turned the alarm off it went back on in a few seconds.

The problem was people taking hot showers, and our floor (the top floor) was getting so hot the fire alarms went off. Yeah, that hot.  :'( :'(
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on July 25, 2012, 09:47:31 PM
Not really an encampment story. It is a NCSA story...


Our SA (Senior Advisor) (He was a police officer for 32+ years) told us (the flight) to grab our blankets and put them over our heads as a meager amount of protection in case of a fire/fire alarm.

So one morning (I think... it is kinda a blur now...) the fire alarm goes off. So we all grab our blankets and head down stairs and meet up at our designated meeting location.

Well, we all had white blankets.... And we looked like a bunch of Klan members.

snicker...hehehehe

Quote

So we got in trouble for that.

Then, one night during showers a fire alarm goes off, (Our SA told us before this to get our towels, because well they didn't say no towels!) so we grab our towels and go to our designated area (after we were all accounted for we moved to a common location with everyone else at the NCSA).

We overheard the executive staff saying "this isn't a drill." So our flight starts to panic, since it went off on our floor first, what did we leave on??? Well, the fire dept. comes and clears the building and we went up to our floor and immediately checked all the irons.

Safe.....

WRONG -- the fire alarm goes off again. Starting at our floor.

SOOOO we run outside again, the fire dept. comes out again, and every time they turned the alarm off it went back on in a few seconds.

The problem was people taking hot showers, and our floor (the top floor) was getting so hot the fire alarms went off. Yeah, that hot.  :'( :'(

Beats the time I got the fire department out to our building at work because I burned a bagel.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spaceman3750 on July 25, 2012, 09:48:37 PM
Beats the time I got the fire department out to our building at work because I burned a bagel.

Entire dorms have been evacuated for burnt popcorn before ;).
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on July 25, 2012, 10:05:48 PM
OK OK time to get this thread back to the humorous and "no $$&# this really happened" type of thing.

1985, Travis ANGB, Savannah, GA encampment.

Two cadet officers decided to walk to the showers wearing nothing but towels, their hats, and shower shoes. Usually not a big deal but the rule was go there dressed, come back dressed. The female barracks were fairly close and we didn't want them to swoon or anything.

They came back after doing their thing and for some reason decided not to go through their door. The way our barracks were set up was that two flights could occupy one barracks, with a door between, which would remain locked and the door window covered. The other end to their area was occupied by senior member TAC officers. They decided to go knock on the SM side for some reason. I was watching with about 10 other people because you don't really see two teenagers walking around in towels. They knocked.
 
An older SM opened the door, took one look, grinned real big and grabbed the lead guy's towel and slammed the door. The cadet officers set a land speed record to get to their end before the SM could race through and lock the other side.

Sadly, the SM involved had only a few months left to live but didn't know it. He'd been acting funny all week and I'd heard later that a brain tumor claimed him not too long after encampment.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: CAP4117 on July 25, 2012, 10:43:30 PM
 :o :o
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on July 26, 2012, 01:01:00 PM
Not really an encampment story. It is a NCSA story...


Our SA (Senior Advisor) (He was a police officer for 32+ years) told us (the flight) to grab our blankets and put them over our heads as a meager amount of protection in case of a fire/fire alarm.

So one morning (I think... it is kinda a blur now...) the fire alarm goes off. So we all grab our blankets and head down stairs and meet up at our designated meeting location.

Well, we all had white blankets.... And we looked like a bunch of Klan members.

So we got in trouble for that.

Then, one night during showers a fire alarm goes off, (Our SA told us before this to get our towels, because well they didn't say no towels!) so we grab our towels and go to our designated area (after we were all accounted for we moved to a common location with everyone else at the NCSA).

We overheard the executive staff saying "this isn't a drill." So our flight starts to panic, since it went off on our floor first, what did we leave on??? Well, the fire dept. comes and clears the building and we went up to our floor and immediately checked all the irons.

Safe.....

WRONG -- the fire alarm goes off again. Starting at our floor.

SOOOO we run outside again, the fire dept. comes out again, and every time they turned the alarm off it went back on in a few seconds.

The problem was people taking hot showers, and our floor (the top floor) was getting so hot the fire alarms went off. Yeah, that hot.  :'( :'(
Volk Field, 1983. The base fire department had to come ventilate the Alpha(female) Squadron barracks. Somehow ::) they had discharged the fire extinguisher which was a Purple K extinguisher. :P "Lucy, you got some 'splainin' to do." >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on July 26, 2012, 02:22:50 PM
Honor Guard Academy Fire Alarm failures

Oh man, that was a fun night. A couple guys in my flight had to take 3 showers because they kept getting interrupted by the alarms...  ;D

That was your flight with the blankets? I thought that looked kinda ridiculous, lol.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on July 26, 2012, 03:56:48 PM
Quote
That was your flight with the blankets? I thought that looked kinda ridiculous, lol.
Yeah, but when there was talk of sleeping in the gym, who had blankets, and who didn't?  ;)

The blankets offered some protection from sparks in case of a real fire.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on August 04, 2012, 01:39:08 PM
Ok, just got home from ATS...

O-course, there is a rappel tower, and I am on top and am next in line. Suddenly another ATS cadet comes up with an ATS staff member. The cadet is sobbing, he gets "expidented" and goes ahead of me, the poor cadet was shaking like a leaf. The USA DI on the tower literally was hanging upside down off the side of the tower talking the cadet down. It took thirty minutes to get the cadet into the L position and to start to descend...

After I went, and we were on the ground, another cadet told me why the one cadet was so afraid. Last year he did it, and the person on belay wasn't paying attention, and the cadet fell almost immediately, and the belay person arrested him seconds before impact. I believe the tower is 60-80 feet high...

THAT, ladies and gents, is conquering your fears.

Edit: Oh, and every day they play taps and revelry. But the last day we woke up to thunderstruck, and a bunch of other awesome music while we cleaned our barracks.

The night of the banquet the ATS commandant gave every female a rose. So after the banquet, in our barracks I asked for a rose, and the commandant scowled and growled at me, but he gave me one, and after the ATS C/CC was done addressing us I asked to make a statement and gave the c/cc my rose. The whole ATS started laughing and clapping. The C/CC cracked the first smile of ATS... Good times.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on August 04, 2012, 01:52:01 PM
Ok, just got home from ATS...

O-course, there is a rappel tower, and I am on top and am next in line. Suddenly another ATS cadet comes up with an ATS staff member. The cadet is sobbing, he gets "expidented" and goes ahead of me, the poor cadet was shaking like a leaf. The USA DI on the tower literally was hanging upside down off the side of the tower talking the cadet down. It took thirty minutes to get the cadet into the L position and to start to descend...

After I went, and we were on the ground, another cadet told me why the one cadet was so afraid. Last year he did it, and the person on belay wasn't paying attention, and the cadet fell almost immediately, and the belay person arrested him seconds before impact. I believe the tower is 60-80 feet high...

THAT, ladies and gents, is conquering your fears.

Yup. Had I had a similar experience on my first rappel, you couldn't have gotten me down with the promise of money or women. Betcha that cadet went running back up to the top to do it again?
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Cap'n on August 04, 2012, 10:47:10 PM
Ok, just got home from ATS...

O-course, there is a rappel tower, and I am on top and am next in line. Suddenly another ATS cadet comes up with an ATS staff member. The cadet is sobbing, he gets "expidented" and goes ahead of me, the poor cadet was shaking like a leaf. The USA DI on the tower literally was hanging upside down off the side of the tower talking the cadet down. It took thirty minutes to get the cadet into the L position and to start to descend...

After I went, and we were on the ground, another cadet told me why the one cadet was so afraid. Last year he did it, and the person on belay wasn't paying attention, and the cadet fell almost immediately, and the belay person arrested him seconds before impact. I believe the tower is 60-80 feet high...

THAT, ladies and gents, is conquering your fears.


Not really important, but did this happen at the COWG Encampment? If so, I was there during the incident.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on August 04, 2012, 11:01:47 PM
No. FLWG encampment.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Cap'n on August 04, 2012, 11:11:59 PM
In any case, that is a traumatic experience, and the cadet should be very proud to face his fears that way. I've been involved in a similar experience, and can admit I will not be going up any of those courses any time soon. Kudos to him.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: HGjunkie on August 05, 2012, 12:47:51 PM
I think I remember that particular incident from last year...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Higgins on August 21, 2012, 12:54:16 AM
We had this guy in our room who had a real sleep talking problem. The worst part was, he slept on the rack directly above me. Every night after nights out it was the same cycle of events. About an hour after lights out it was nothing but farting noises and muffled laughter. Another hour after that was when the real fun began. The sleeptalker would start making strange gurgling noises and grunts and whatnot. Now what comes next is completely true. He would always have some kind of sleep talking war story about vietnam. The first thing he said was "drop the napalm" and the entire room was woken up by some hysterical laughter. He then proceeded to tell a dramatic and interesting story about some kind of battle which never happened. That's encampment for ya.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on August 21, 2012, 01:11:32 AM
^^^ Too many movies .. too early on ;-)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AngelWings on August 21, 2012, 01:24:21 AM
Here's a JROTC one:

I was doing the LRC at the range and there is this one course we had to complete. The one with two tubes you have to climb into and then you have two poles in the center of a sand/water pit. I've done this one before with CAP.

I take charge of the situation even though I wasn't the team leader, just because it was so hot out. Everything is going fine. I was told to stay on the sidelines half way through, not because I messed up, but because I was leading everyone through the obstacle too well. I was "complete decimated by a mortar." So the guy in charge now, a great guy with a great sense of humor, is wrapping up the course. Welp, he was the last person left and had gotten one of the planks over. He had the ammo can straddled in between his legs. The board is slipping, slipping, BOOM!

He fell down and got an ammo can slammed into a place an ammo can should never go. It looked PAINFUL. His face contorted up, and because the injury was so epic, we were given a pass...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Higgins on August 21, 2012, 11:28:26 PM
^^^ Too many movies .. too early on ;-)
You hit it right on the nose. The second we got up in the morning thats the first thing we told him.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: CAPC/officer125 on August 26, 2012, 04:00:37 PM
Beats the time I got the fire department out to our building at work because I burned a bagel.

Entire dorms have been evacuated for burnt popcorn before ;).

My year at COS, I set my microwave a-smokin with popcorm or something like that and set the alarm off in my room...really interesting for me to get that conveyed to the people coming to check it out. I was on the 3rd or 4th floor so I had opened my window to clear out the smoke and the people down on the ground were yelling at me.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/2d Lt on September 16, 2012, 09:05:55 PM
I cant forget the terrible storm and all of us including staff having to sleep in the mess hall
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: CadetColonelToBe on September 22, 2012, 11:15:08 PM
I cant forget the terrible storm and all of us including staff having to sleep in the mess hall
That's nothing; at my encampment we had a terrible storm and they thought the barracks might fall over. So they evacuated into a nearby theater which has a stage in it. Then to make us forget about the storm the staff got up on the stage and started doing a bunch of skits. It was "hilarious"!!!!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: That Anonymous Guy on September 23, 2012, 11:43:32 AM
I cant forget the terrible storm and all of us including staff having to sleep in the mess hall
Well staff were in tents usually, but I remember I guess it was an hour after lights out? Anyway my buddy wakes me up and this one kid cadet is sitting in his cot, eyes wide open like a deer in headlights and people had to run back into the bungalow to get him. And 3 hours later after we were all sleeping my battle buddy woke me up TWICE to use the restrooms
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Jon Knapp on September 24, 2012, 06:57:37 PM
I cant forget the terrible storm and all of us including staff having to sleep in the mess hall
That's nothing; at my encampment we had a terrible storm and they thought the barracks might fall over. So they evacuated into a nearby theater which has a stage in it. Then to make us forget about the storm the staff got up on the stage and started doing a bunch of skits. It was "hilarious"!!!!

Was your encampment at Fort Pickett...I have stayed many a nights at Fort Pickett and thought the same thing about the barracks falling over...lol.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on September 24, 2012, 07:15:35 PM
At my first and second encampments at Fort Benning, if you sneezed wrong, the barracks would shudder. One cadet got it in his head that swinging from the rafters was a good idea and stopped only when it gave under his hand. The time-honored way of melting shoe polish into a boot with a lighter was forbidden because it was felt that even a small spark would send the barracks up in flames in about 20 seconds.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Jon Knapp on September 24, 2012, 07:49:18 PM
That's funny...hope there wasn't a safety report...lol.  My last encampment was like that...except I was a flight commander trying to keep the basic cadets from doing that...lol.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SARMan on September 28, 2012, 08:53:14 AM
I was on staff, and got bored so I started a staff MRE/ candy black market. Surpisingly ( or probably not so much ), candy was in high demand with the staff towards the middle of the week. They were willing to pay a ton for like five skittles lol. I didnt do too bad as far as profit goes. I walked out of encampment with more money than i had when i went in.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Jon Knapp on September 28, 2012, 09:49:22 AM
Yeah...I think I did too...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on September 30, 2012, 08:09:46 PM
At my first and second encampments at Fort Benning, if you sneezed wrong, the barracks would shudder. One cadet got it in his head that swinging from the rafters was a good idea and stopped only when it gave under his hand. The time-honored way of melting shoe polish into a boot with a lighter was forbidden because it was felt that even a small spark would send the barracks up in flames in about 20 seconds.
Sounds like Harmony Church.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on October 01, 2012, 12:01:05 AM
At my first and second encampments at Fort Benning, if you sneezed wrong, the barracks would shudder. One cadet got it in his head that swinging from the rafters was a good idea and stopped only when it gave under his hand. The time-honored way of melting shoe polish into a boot with a lighter was forbidden because it was felt that even a small spark would send the barracks up in flames in about 20 seconds.
Sounds like Harmony Church.

I think that's what it was called. The barracks had a nice view of the airfield.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: GunnersMate99 on November 04, 2012, 02:32:52 PM
My first encampment was at the Great Lakes Naval Base in Illinois. I was in Delta flight and we were probably made up of the scraps of the worst cadets in CAP. The worst part of it was out Flight seargent was a short fat ginger who was really hard to take seriously.

Well by the end of encampment my flight's staff was completely different. Our flight commander changed the second weekend because the original was late and was taken off of command. The last day of encampment our flight seargent (The one who EVERYONE hated, even the other flights) left before our graduation so we got a new flight seargent.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on November 04, 2012, 03:00:00 PM
My first encampment was at the Great Lakes Naval Base in Illinois. I was in Delta flight and we were probably made up of the scraps of the worst cadets in CAP. The worst part of it was out Flight seargent was a short fat ginger who was really hard to take seriously.

Well by the end of encampment my flight's staff was completely different. Our flight commander changed the second weekend because the original was late and was taken off of command. The last day of encampment our flight seargent (The one who EVERYONE hated, even the other flights) left before our graduation so we got a new flight seargent.

So...they aren't using Volk Field anymore?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: docbiochem33 on November 04, 2012, 03:09:03 PM
My encampment when I was a cadet was at Phelps Collins ANGB (now Alpena CRTC).  A cadet officer from my unit was on staff and made a few mistakes while there.  He fell asleep during a class and we all saw him.  We reported it and he got stuck with the rock people that who screwed up had to carry for a day.

Another cadet officer was walking backwards and ran into a telephone pole.  Although this would have been funny in and of itself, but he had to take it one step further.  He instantly turned around and saluted the telephone pole thinking it was an officer.  It got a good laugh out of a lot of people.

The best "accident" I saw was not at an encampment it was when I was a medic at OCS for the army national guard.  The junior class was practicing for retreat and the candidate who was to pull the tail on the cannon did so while practicing setting it off.  Because there was not enough time to reload it, they had him yell "BOOM" at retreat.  The entire place lost it.  The Deputy Commander for the facility kept yelling for us to stop laughing and we did about 5 minutes later.  That candidate was not on that detail again.

Cadets, don't worry, even the professionals make mistakes.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on November 04, 2012, 03:25:21 PM
My first encampment was at the Great Lakes Naval Base in Illinois. I was in Delta flight and we were probably made up of the scraps of the worst cadets in CAP. The worst part of it was out Flight seargent was a short fat ginger who was really hard to take seriously.

Well by the end of encampment my flight's staff was completely different. Our flight commander changed the second weekend because the original was late and was taken off of command. The last day of encampment our flight seargent (The one who EVERYONE hated, even the other flights) left before our graduation so we got a new flight seargent.

So...they aren't using Volk Field anymore?

This was the Illinois Wing Spring Encampment he went to.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on November 04, 2012, 03:26:55 PM
This was the Illinois Wing Spring Encampment he went to.

Slightly curious as to when this was, since this does not sync with my recollection.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on November 04, 2012, 11:47:29 PM
My first encampment was at the Great Lakes Naval Base in Illinois. I was in Delta flight and we were probably made up of the scraps of the worst cadets in CAP. The worst part of it was out Flight seargent was a short fat ginger who was really hard to take seriously.

Well by the end of encampment my flight's staff was completely different. Our flight commander changed the second weekend because the original was late and was taken off of command. The last day of encampment our flight seargent (The one who EVERYONE hated, even the other flights) left before our graduation so we got a new flight seargent.

So...they aren't using Volk Field anymore?
Spring was never at Volk. Summer has not been at Volk since 2004 I believe. Let me think...'05, '06, and '07 were at Marseilles Training Center and '08-'12 have been at Camp Lincoln in Springfield, IL.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on November 04, 2012, 11:56:35 PM
This was the Illinois Wing Spring Encampment he went to.

Slightly curious as to when this was, since this does not sync with my recollection.

I've heard of a similar event, but not quite how it is presented here...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on November 05, 2012, 12:52:37 AM
My first encampment was at the Great Lakes Naval Base in Illinois. I was in Delta flight and we were probably made up of the scraps of the worst cadets in CAP. The worst part of it was out Flight seargent was a short fat ginger who was really hard to take seriously.

Well by the end of encampment my flight's staff was completely different. Our flight commander changed the second weekend because the original was late and was taken off of command. The last day of encampment our flight seargent (The one who EVERYONE hated, even the other flights) left before our graduation so we got a new flight seargent.

So...they aren't using Volk Field anymore?
Spring was never at Volk. Summer has not been at Volk since 2004 I believe. Let me think...'05, '06, and '07 were at Marseilles Training Center and '08-'12 have been at Camp Lincoln in Springfield, IL.

They didn't have those things when I was in WIWG, hence my confusion. The last time I went to Volk for summer encampment was in 94 I think.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on November 05, 2012, 07:51:51 PM
Confused here. "Things"? Do you mean summer encampments? ???
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on November 06, 2012, 02:04:29 AM
Confused here. "Things"? Do you mean summer encampments? ???

spring encampments.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on November 06, 2012, 04:47:21 PM
Illinois Wing has two encampments. The Summer Encampment is the usual week long encampment. It is held obviously in the summer. For many years, it was either at Volk or the old Chanute AFB(closed now). The last eight years it has been held in the locations I gave. We got pushed out of Volk after 2004 because of the high ops tempo the base was taking on for the GWOT. Same thing happened to us at Marseilles(which is literally in the middle of a corn field southwest of Chicago near the town of the same name). So we have ended up at the Illinois Military Academy at Camp Lincoln in Springfield. The facility was so new that we were the first and, since then basically the only, user of the dining facility kitchen. I was just told today that our dates for next year are the 14-21 July.

The Spring Encampment is actually run by Group 22. It is a weekend encampment that usually runs in April on consecutive weekends. AFIK, it has always been held at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center. It is sometimes referred to as the Great Lakes encampment which can be confused with the GLR encampment at Alpena, MI.

Wisconsin has just got back to having their encampment at Volk as they were squeezed out about the same time we were. Last year they came down to Camp Lincoln with us.
 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on November 06, 2012, 05:04:14 PM
ILWG Spring Encampment has been running since 1991, always on the RTC.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on November 06, 2012, 06:13:01 PM
Yeah, I remember we were at Volk with ILWG in '94 but it wasn't a joint encampment, two totally separate entities.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Sluice on November 15, 2012, 01:09:06 PM
So our flight sergeant had us all standing at attention, giving us a talk because our bunks were not looking to good. After going down the isle and pointing out what needed to be done, he came to my bunk. Since I was a head taller than he was, when standing at attention my eye's were looking above his head. Annoyed that I was looking above him while he was talking, he said very loudly, "LOOK DOWN AT ME!" The whole barracks burst out in laughter. Even our flight sergeant found it funny! I got out of that one!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Extremepredjudice on January 12, 2013, 08:25:56 PM
One morning, I was standing in a no salute zone by the latrines (waiting on someone). 4 basics walked by to use the latrine. All 4 saluted and said "Good evening ma'am!"

Just so everyone knows, I am a guy, a C/CMSgt, it was 6 A.M, and did I mention it was a no salute zone?

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on January 13, 2013, 11:50:42 AM
One morning, I was standing in a no salute zone by the latrines (waiting on someone). 4 basics walked by to use the latrine. All 4 saluted and said "Good evening ma'am!"

Just so everyone knows, I am a guy, a C/CMSgt, it was 6 A.M, and did I mention it was a no salute zone?
That's nothing. Wait till some eager beaver calls the latrine to attention when you walk in. If they still refer to you as Ma'am, you might have a bigger problem. >:D

Also, the final dates for the ILWG Summer Encampment have been changed to 23-30 June 2013.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on January 13, 2013, 02:32:53 PM
Extreme-

Reminds me of the movie "No Time for Sergeants," about an Air Force new recruit. He is dumb slow but very eager. At some point he is given latrine duty and as his sergeant inspects his work, he calls the room to attention and all the toilet seats go up.

For the life of me, I cannot remember the protagonist's name. I used to watch another show of him, Matlock. He was very famous as well for another show of him where he portrayed the sheriff of a small town. His son was Opie, and Don Knotts was his deputy.

Flyer
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Struts on January 13, 2013, 03:41:39 PM
Andy Griffith. That was a hilarious movie.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on January 13, 2013, 04:21:59 PM
Flyer, your CRS syndrome is kicking in! >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on January 13, 2013, 04:34:32 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqg4rJPUxGs# (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqg4rJPUxGs#)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on February 21, 2013, 05:25:44 PM
A2,

Thank YOU! Made my day to see that scene again... :clap:

Flyer
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on February 21, 2013, 05:48:54 PM
I was a TAC officer at an Encampment and we were coming back from a party the last night. Everyone in Blues. Tired. Sleepy. Or I do not know, no energy.

Our driver, since we were in an AF short bus, was an AF sergeant assigned to help us...

All of a sudden, he lets bus number 2 pass, looks back, pulls over and starts yelling. He said it so fast that I could not understand what he said. Every cadet runs out and I am going "What the H! What the...!" And as quickly as everyone (except me) left the bus, he yells back and everyone ran back in. Again I am "What the H! What the...!" So I ask someone behind me "What happened?" The answer I got was "It was a fire drill." I was LOL. Fire drill in a bus??? ;D Everyone was pepped up. There was conversation, etc.

Then getting to the barracks, he starts a slalom run using telephone poles as markers. We were in a dirt road... All of a sudden he looks at me. A CAP First Lieutenant. Who could be an informant.  >:D He asks "Sir, have you seen anything improper?"

My answer was "No Sgt, everything is hunky dory."

I saw all he did! Done with care, not exceeding the speed, looking to see if there was anyone or another vehicle...

And I remember the very first day. A cadet started putting toilet paper between the telephone poles by the barracks dirt road. Faster than it took me to think and analyze whether the cadet may have been told to use the toilet paper to close the toad for some reason, the same sergeant thought and decided the cadet was fooling around, and barked a "What are ya doin!" from two barracks from him...

And the AF sergeants were instrumental in us getting an activity... We were the Honor Flight and were to be given a night map reading exercise. The Encampment Commander knew about it, but for some reason decided to talk to us about how special we were after dinner. So she came late, and she was one of those people that can talk and talk and talk and... You get it, she talked to us long and made us late. The Army Sgts who were to give us the activity, were not there since we were late. The AF Sgts who were our drivers scaled the fence of the building, found a way to get into the building, and said "This will be tactical. No lights, no lightscopes, no lightstics, no flashlights." We were in a forested area, yet there was still enough star light for us to find our way around.

Flyer
Title: Most memorable Encampments
Post by: Capt. $ on March 29, 2013, 06:54:25 PM
What are your favorite Encampment experiences?
Title: Re: Most memorable Encampments
Post by: Jaison009 on March 29, 2013, 07:01:01 PM
Leading the most dedicated cadets of the 1999 AK Wing encampment at Ft. Wainwright, AK along with my Flight Sgt (who was my C/CSM in ARJROTC) to sweeping honor flight. The full motion Blackhawk simulator and our road march (picked up and dropped off by CH-47 Chinooks, simulated events with our Army TAC officers, and then we performed a road march back to our encampment location before drill competition) was awesome too. It was one of the better encampments I attended. 
Title: Re: Most memorable Encampments
Post by: The Infamous Meerkat on April 04, 2013, 06:51:48 AM
HIWG Encampment 2012....    >:D a2capt, care to comment?  ;D
Title: Re: Most memorable Encampments
Post by: Duke Dillio on April 04, 2013, 08:01:23 AM
DCWG encampment 1991...  Held at Ft. Belvoir, VA....  I'd been in CAP for about 4 months....  Got to take pride in not passing out even though about half the cadets there did drop...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Black Knight on April 12, 2013, 12:34:42 AM
I cant forget the terrible storm and all of us including staff having to sleep in the mess hall
Oh my god, I hated that night. My friend forgot his pillow, so to be nice, I gave him mine. that was a dumb move on my part
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Black Knight on April 12, 2013, 12:48:04 AM
One night during motivation check, Bravo flight did a parody of Potter Puppet Pal's "Mysterious Ticking Noise." (they used the cadet command staff instead of HP characters) Everyone was marching and singing it afterwards.

And there was this guy on the SET team who would always yell at cadets "Cadet, GET OFF MY DRILLPAD!!" and one day, someone put an apple on it. So while I'm waiting for my uniform inspection, the next thing I hear is "Why is there an Apple ON MY DRILLPAD!" He kicked that thing so far, it would've made an NFL kicker jealous. (ok maybe not that far) 

I had my C-130 flight right after we ate and right before the storm came in, so it was very bumpy and almost everyone  threw up. (not me, i took a nap in the back)
And I got the 3rd highest overall score! (Iwas 12 then.)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Sergeant Langley on April 30, 2013, 09:53:24 PM
I have some of the best encampment story's ever.
 
    Oklahoma Summer 2012- We are standing at attention on a field for like 10 minuets. We were all starting to get agitated. Then we see two Black-Hawks coming our way. After they knew we knew the staff told us to put our thumbs back and maybe we would get a ride. Soon after that the Black-Hawks landed landed and took us up in sorties. It was the best time ever with both doors open. Although at the end they tore are our barracks apart and made scarecrows with our our uniforms.

    Texas Summer 2012- Best encampment ever. National Guard gave our flight a bunch of Girl Scout cookies. The encampment went well until some stupid cadet ate PEANUT BUTTER cookies when he had a allergy to peanuts.  The cadet and Senior staff were mad. The Cadet who was on CQ with me fell asleep outside. I just barely managed to get him up before a senior member walked over. The Flight Sergeant sadly was not the best role model. Overall though they were both good encampments.
Title: Re: Most memorable Encampments
Post by: Sergeant Langley on April 30, 2013, 10:01:01 PM
I have some of the best encampment storys ever.
 
    Oklahoma Summer 2012- We are standing at attention on a field for like 10min. We were all starting to get agitated. Then we see two Blackhawks coming our way. Then the staff told us to put our thumbs back and maybe we would get a ride. Guess what they landed and took us up in sorties. Best time ever with both doors open. Although at the end they tore are barracks apart and made scarecrows with are uniforms.

    Texas Summer 2012- Best encampment ever. National Guard gave our flight a bunch of Girl Scout cookies. All went well until some stupid cadet ate PEANUT BUTTER cookies when he had a allergy. Staff were mad. The guy who was on CQ with me fell asleep outside. I just barely managed to get him up before a senior member walked over. Flight Sergeant sadly was not the best role model. 
Title: Re: Most memorable Encampments
Post by: Eclipse on April 30, 2013, 10:48:12 PM
http://captalk.net/index.php?topic=12750.msg231808#msg231808 (http://captalk.net/index.php?topic=12750.msg231808#msg231808)

Due to various circumstances, I missed Spring this year for the first time in 13 years.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: spazyjosh on June 06, 2013, 01:48:19 PM
   Last year at Utah Wing Encampment encampment they called out all the cadets who's hair was out of regs. They told them that their hair was out of regs and that they were going to cut it for them. One cadet completely serious raises his hand and asks "Are we going to a salon?"

      After hearing this the staff all try to contain themselves from laughing until finally the squadron commander said yes. Needless to say the cadet was disappointed when he was lead to a barrack built to the temporary standards of WWII with a little sign that read Wendover Salon and. sweaty men with razors buzzing hair
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: NIN on June 12, 2013, 03:59:20 PM
Encampment 1989. Its two weeks long, first week being Cadet Leadership School & OJT, 2nd week will be basic encampment and another round of OJT, plus some senior training events.  I'm the Chief TAC and the Leadership Officer for CLS, and this is my first encampment after 3 years of Active Duty. I hardly knew anybody but the senior cadet staff.

During the first weekend, I remarked to the CLS director, an old friend and mentor, that I'd never met this one C/Capt in the OJT program, and that she looked "kind of cute." (mind you, I'm like 23, she's 18, CPP is new, and all I'm doing is remarking...)

Each day during chow, I notice that this c/Capt is always sitting someplace in the chow hall where she's facing me, and I catch her checking me out. I'd look up from my tray or away from the conversation and she'd be looking my way and then she'd look away like she got caught.

By Sunday dinner, I'm pretty sure I'm not crazy and yes, she's definitely checking me out at chow.

"Ron," I say to the CLS director, "I'm pretty sure c/Capt Stuart (not her real name) is checking me out."

"Pffft, Darin. You're crazy."

"I dunno, I keep seeing her looking at me when I glance up. Its strange."

"You're seeing things, man. She's a cadet, you're old...."

I shrug my shoulders and go back to dinner, but it still nags me. Something just isn't right.

Each morning, we got the cadets up at 0545 for PC.  I'm a solid sleeper, so to keep my barracks mates from killing me with flying combat boots, my male Cadet TAC would come in the barracks at 0530 and wake me up each morning.  My bunk is the first bed inside the door of our open bay single floor barracks, so he literally just comes in, shakes me awake and then leaves.

Tuesday morning, I'm busily sawing logs or dreaming of sugarplums or something and I hear "Sir.. Sir.. get up" while I'm being shaken awake.  I'm sleeping on my left side, head to the wall, back to the door.  I partly roll over to my right, saying "yeah, yeah.. thanks.." to the figure of c/Capt Stuart, female, one each (the same c/Capt who I think is checking me out all the time) waking me up, and then roll back over to my left into my original position.

Then it hits me. My eyes click open in barracks gloom.  c/Capt Stuart?!? Wait, WHAT?

I roll over and sit up straight in bed. My male Cadet TAC is standing between the foot of my rack and my wall locker, his back to the barracks door, leaning over like he's just woken me up, like he's done the previous two mornings.

"Sir? You ok?"

"uhhh," I rub my face, "Yeah, be there in a minute.."

He turns and exits the barracks. I'm certain I'm losing my mind, now.  c/Capt Stuart? Waking me up? Really? This has CPP violation written all over it and all I did was imagine it!

I glance across the aisle and idly notice that the CLS director is in his bunk, propped up on one elbow, looking at me in a bemused fashion.  I'm 3/4 asleep still, so it doesn't register. Ron is NEVER awake at 0530. So why is he now?

I get up, grab my boom box and head over to the barracks in the pre-dawn cold to wake the troopies up. I meet my male & female cadet TACs outside the male cadet barracks.

"Sir, are you OK? You didn't look too alert this morning," says my male Cadet TAC.

"yeah, I'll be fine, I just... I just didn't quite wake up right away or something."

That morning at breakfast, I'm relating the story to the CLS Director.

"Man, you're losing it,"  he says. "CLS is affecting your brain or something.  A female cadet in the male senior staff barracks?  How would that even happen? I saw the cadet TAC wake you up.."

I agree and finish my breakfast, certain that I'm a deviant or something.

Later that day, after I notice that the c/Capt is not checking me out at chow now, I'm headed toward our classroom after lunch when I hear a female voice shouting "Sir! Sir!" behind me.  I turn around, its c/Capt Stuart running to catch up with me on the road.  We exchange salutes.

"What can I do for you, Capt Stuart?"

"Sir, I wanted to apologize."

"Apologize? For what?"

"Well, you see, sir, the Major, he put me up to it. I don't want to cause any trouble.."

"Put you up to what? Trouble?"

"He wanted to pull a little practical joke on you, and, well, sir, I didn't think it was fair that it should go on too far.."

Suddenly it dawns on me. My friend, the CLS director (and, honestly, a hell of a practical joker) just totally put one over on me. A multi-day, multi-participant practical joke of epic proportions.  Come to find out, he'd immediately enlisted her aid on the gag, told her to just "get caught looking" at chow, and he'd do the rest. 

Later, he'd engineered the whole "wake up the Lt for PT" scenario.  She'd been frightened to death that I'd wake right up when she shook me, and she said that when I rolled over and opened my eyes, she nearly bolted right there.  My Cadet TAC was standing right behind her and as soon as I'd rolled back over, she stepped back thru the open barracks door and he stepped forward.  2 seconds of "Wait, WHAT?" on my part and the deal was sealed.

The good thing was, its was only Tuesday of the first week of a two week encampment! I had at least 10 more days to scheme for my revenge!

(as an aside, the c/Capt later became a flight officer and is still a good friend 20+ years later. And we still laugh our heads off at this story)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: miss.aviator.girl on June 30, 2013, 08:53:49 PM
 I don't intend to share any stories, but ILWG Summer Encampment 2013 was positively outstanding! I went as a basic. Were any of you there?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: BillB on July 01, 2013, 07:07:51 AM
In 1965, Florida Wing ran what could be called a CLS followed by a two week encampment followed by a 2nd CLS and two week encampment. I had been dating the Senior Supply officer for a year or so and during the first encampment I said lets go to Georgia and get married (GA didn't have a 3 day waiting period and was close to Tyndall AFB). She said yes and I grabbed the Cadet PAO to shoot photos and we took off for Donaldsonville GA. When we returned I gave her an extra name tag that I had with her "new name", it took two days before the female cadet staff realized her name had changed and they were up in arms that they were not involved. Senior staff knew, cadet staff did not.
So the sneaky cadet staff got busy and during the 2nd encampment they got The Tyndall AFB Dining Hall staff to make up a giagantic sheet cake, got the base Chaplain's OK to hold a full military wedding in the Base Chapel, with all 300+ cadets attending. Wedding photos even made the Base newspaper.
Of course that couldn't happen under todays regulations and CPP. By the way, the Cadet PAO later became a Wing Commander (not FL Wing)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Silva Bullet on July 10, 2013, 10:02:49 AM
Cool little story here... My flight commander this year (foxtrot flight) at the 2013 GAWG encampment was Lt. Johnson... This years NBB Cadet Commander!

Hooah Ma'am!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TJT__98 on July 11, 2013, 04:43:47 AM
Training Day Four, I woke up at what felt like time for PT and thought something along the lines of “Theres no point in going back to sleep, I’ll be woken up in ten minutes anyway.” And started getting my PT belt and socks on while in bed. Then I started to notice that all the cadets in my flight were either up or waking up.We sat waiting for PT for what felt like two hours, and then I saw the door open, the light come on and my chief walk to the second row of bunks and said in a normal, conversation tone:“Well, you’re all awake already so theres no point in doing this. Showers and BDUs.”
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Joystick on July 14, 2013, 06:08:14 PM
Training Day Four, I woke up at what felt like time for PT and thought something along the lines of “Theres no point in going back to sleep, I’ll be woken up in ten minutes anyway.” And started getting my PT belt and socks on while in bed. Then I started to notice that all the cadets in my flight were either up or waking up.We sat waiting for PT for what felt like two hours, and then I saw the door open, the light come on and my chief walk to the second row of bunks and said in a normal, conversation tone:“Well, you’re all awake already so theres no point in doing this. Showers and BDUs.”

Hey did you go to the Al/MS encampment? I was there and had an awesome time.

My encampment story is that my flight and I were in the van heading back to our base and we were picking and singing Jodies. We started the "Down by the River" Jodie and randomly picked a flight from encampment to add to the lines " ran into ____, had a little talk, we pushed 'em, we shoved 'em, we threw 'em in the river, and laughed as they drowned, we don't need no ____, a hanging around." Well it turns out the cadet officer that was sitting in the front seat was the flight commander of that flight. Whoops!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: miss.aviator.girl on July 14, 2013, 09:28:50 PM
Okay,okay. Here's a story from ILWG Summer Encampment 2013. I was the guidon bearer for Bravo Flight. (Bravo Blackhawks HUAHHHHHH!) One night about a male cadet from Echo Flight decided to steal our guidon while we were showering. Okay, I am a female cadet. The guidon was posted in a female room. Nobody was in the room, and this MALE cadet went into a FEMALE room without permission and grabbed our guidon that I POSTED. (Whenever  I posted the guidon I was always very loud about it.) So myself and the other female cadets I was bunked with return from showers and find our guidon is missing. So I find our flight sergeant and she and I went around knocking on everyone's doors looking for our guidon. Now, my voice sounded all scratchy because my throat was sore because at the time I didn't know how to speak from the diaphragm. People told me I sounded like Gollum from Lord of the Rings. So I went around saying " Where's our guidon, my precious, my precious!". It was hilarious. We eventually got it and everybody got yelled at by the Cadet Commander about the rules of guidon stealing. That was a great encampment.

Squadron Honor Cadet, ILWG Summer Encampment 2013
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spaceman3750 on July 14, 2013, 09:38:07 PM
I didn't think guidon stealing was allowed at all?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: miss.aviator.girl on July 14, 2013, 09:44:01 PM
I didn't think guidon stealing was allowed at all?

They allowed it at that encampment, but there were certain rules. It got pretty confusing. As the week went on, cadets from that flight made many more attempts to steal out guidon. (My precious! My precious!)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on July 14, 2013, 10:58:03 PM
So, they allow guidon theft at the ILWG Encampment.


Interesting....
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on July 14, 2013, 11:02:34 PM
So, they allow guidon theft at the ILWG Summer Encampment.


Interesting....

Fixed that for you.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on July 15, 2013, 08:31:34 PM
So, they allow guidon theft at the ILWG Encampment.


Interesting....

Time honored tradition...WIWAC, at encampment, the only time you can't snag it is at mess or if it's been secured for the evening. You could snatch it out of an unsuspecting bearer's hand, but you had to be ready for a fight. If you lost it, your flight lost points and had to eat last until they either earned it back or stole it back. Oh, the memories...I cheated and tied it to my arm. Tried handcuffs but it made presenting a bit difficult.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TJT__98 on July 20, 2013, 11:11:51 PM
Training Day Four, I woke up at what felt like time for PT and thought something along the lines of “Theres no point in going back to sleep, I’ll be woken up in ten minutes anyway.” And started getting my PT belt and socks on while in bed. Then I started to notice that all the cadets in my flight were either up or waking up.We sat waiting for PT for what felt like two hours, and then I saw the door open, the light come on and my chief walk to the second row of bunks and said in a normal, conversation tone:“Well, you’re all awake already so theres no point in doing this. Showers and BDUs.”

Hey did you go to the Al/MS encampment? I was there and had an awesome time.

My encampment story is that my flight and I were in the van heading back to our base and we were picking and singing Jodies. We started the "Down by the River" Jodie and randomly picked a flight from encampment to add to the lines " ran into ____, had a little talk, we pushed 'em, we shoved 'em, we threw 'em in the river, and laughed as they drowned, we don't need no ____, a hanging around." Well it turns out the cadet officer that was sitting in the front seat was the flight commander of that flight. Whoops!
Yes, what flight were you in?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Joystick on July 23, 2013, 03:09:30 PM
I was in Falcon.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TheKing on July 28, 2013, 07:41:15 PM
There were some very hilarious things that happened at my encampment. I'll only name one.
It was my third barracks inspection, and I had been studying my OI's required knowledge section furiously as to not be humiliated when I was asked my OI question.

The time came for the Inspection, and when the Squadron staff busted in our barracks door, I stood at attention immediately along with my other peers. The staff went around to everybody, and as they did so, I noticed that they asked a lot of questions about the chain of command. The chain of command that I had not even thought to study AT ALL.
So, they came to me and asked how I was doing, I sounded off "OUTSTANDING, SIR", he checked my uniform, and he asked a question:
"Who is your squadron commander?"
Perfect, I thought. I had no idea who this person was, so I said the first name I remembered from the OI. "Lt. Col. Andy Wiggs, Sir!"
They finished up the inspection and the moment they leave the room, my flight sergeant goes insane. He said, "THAT WAS THE BEST INSPECTION I HAD EVER SEEN, UNTIL WE GOT TO THE OI QUESTIONS! CADET KING!"
He had just called my name, and I just sighed and waited for his verbal beating.
The flight sergeant continued, saying "The squadron commander, who was standing RIGHT IN FRONT OF YOU, is not SENIOR MEMBER Andy Wiggs, it was CADET FIRST LIEUTENANT TIMOTHY MCCAN!"
That was all the encouragement I needed to study the chain of command.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on July 28, 2013, 08:44:17 PM
While conducting the inspection portion of our Squadron Drill Comp (winner goes to the Group Comp) I asked each cadet I inspected two questions.
The first was one of the required memory work items and the second was a chain of command question.
I had just ONE cadet who could tell me who the National Commander of CAP was. :-\
Memory work they had down. Chain of Command up thru the California Wing Commander, no problem.
But asking who the Region or National Commander was usually resulted in guessing or in a few cases no answer at all.
The Flight Commander's found out right there where they needed to devote some time to.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TheKing on July 28, 2013, 10:25:02 PM
Another funny one, during flight time at the end of the day my flight sergeant at NC encampment would tell stories. This is one of when he was a basic.  My flight sergeant will be referred to as "joe" as to not disclose any names.
It was just after morning PT, and Joe had about thirty seconds to get his BDU's on. After he went to breakfast, he was in morning formation. His flight sergeant told the flight to get out their OIs and study them. Joe reached in his pocket, and he didn't have his OI, he only had the front and back cover. So he stood at parade rest with the front and back cover open pretending to read the OI. Nobody noticed a thing.

Back to my encampment, people in my flight were starting to get restless with that awful sounding whistle that Chief (My flight sergeant, he was a chief master sergeant) blew in the mornings. So they devised a system. They would get up about ten minutes before the bugle sounded, "inform" their battle buddy that they needed to "use the latrine", get out, and wait until the bugle sounded, and fall back into the flight for PT. I wasn't part of this system.

Last, on Thursday of encampment we had an FTX. Somebody from a different flight was sent to our Basic Ground Team flight to operate the radio. And this guy had a thing for making mission base angry. First, he radioed in mission base, saying "Home base, this is Ground Team 1, over", to which mission base replied "Ground team one, we are not referred to as home base, we are MISSION base, over". Our radioman replied "Sorry, MISSION base this is ground team one, over." Then mission base replied something along the lines of "Don't use that tone of voice with us, young man". There was a point where this guy was having a full out argument with mission base. I kid you not.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Maj Collins on July 29, 2013, 12:00:23 AM
I went to LDC in PA wing this year and we has a C/2ndLt talk on his sleep during firewatch. He said "if you talk at the position of attention one more time I will tear your heart out." He said a lot of other things, that was just the most memorable.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on July 29, 2013, 11:50:51 AM
There were some very hilarious things that happened at my encampment. I'll only name one.
It was my third barracks inspection, and I had been studying my OI's required knowledge section furiously as to not be humiliated when I was asked my OI question.

The time came for the Inspection, and when the Squadron staff busted in our barracks door, I stood at attention immediately along with my other peers. The staff went around to everybody, and as they did so, I noticed that they asked a lot of questions about the chain of command. The chain of command that I had not even thought to study AT ALL.
So, they came to me and asked how I was doing, I sounded off "OUTSTANDING, SIR", he checked my uniform, and he asked a question:
"Who is your squadron commander?"
Perfect, I thought. I had no idea who this person was, so I said the first name I remembered from the OI. "Lt. Col. Andy Wiggs, Sir!"
They finished up the inspection and the moment they leave the room, my flight sergeant goes insane. He said, "THAT WAS THE BEST INSPECTION I HAD EVER SEEN, UNTIL WE GOT TO THE OI QUESTIONS! CADET KING!"
He had just called my name, and I just sighed and waited for his verbal beating.
The flight sergeant continued, saying "The squadron commander, who was standing RIGHT IN FRONT OF YOU, is not SENIOR MEMBER Andy Wiggs, it was CADET FIRST LIEUTENANT TIMOTHY MCCAN!"
That was all the encouragement I needed to study the chain of command.

 :clap: :clap: :clap:

[/sarcasm]
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Jazjar on July 29, 2013, 11:47:09 PM
I've got a couple from VAWG 2013 ( my first ) but this is pretty good.  Alpha flight had a guidon bearer of slavic ancestry, and the rest of Encampment had to listen to them say their water cadence in Russian... Made for an interesting time in chow lines.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on July 30, 2013, 07:23:08 PM
One night at Chanute AFB in 1979, I sat beside the barracks on fire watch eating apples off the trees that grew there. We then threw the cores across the street into the BX parking lot. My fellow fire watchman was a kid whose family had escaped from E. Germany about 10 years before.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TexasCadet on August 01, 2013, 06:35:16 PM
One kid in my flight at my basic was quite the goof off. At one point, we were standing at attention, and it has just rained earlier, so there were a lot of clouds in the sky. So, this kid raises his hand and asks our flight sergeant "Chief, can we look at that cloud for a moment? It looks so pretty." Everyone broke out laughing except me (I can be compared to Spock). "Chief" was not amused.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TJT__98 on August 01, 2013, 09:36:15 PM
Fascinating, at my encampment I was compared to Mr. Spock. I suppose that on earth this would be referred to as "coincedence."
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on August 01, 2013, 10:20:43 PM
Fascinating, at my encampment I was compared to Mr. Spock. I suppose that on earth this would be referred to as "coincedence."

Yeah, but Mr Worf got honor flight! >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on September 07, 2013, 07:58:02 PM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Nor'easter on September 07, 2013, 09:21:11 PM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)

Did you have "a hottie" as your flight commander?  ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on September 08, 2013, 12:24:13 AM
One night at Chanute AFB in 1979, I sat beside the barracks on fire watch eating apples off the trees that grew there. We then threw the cores across the street into the BX parking lot. My fellow fire watchman was a kid whose family had escaped from E. Germany about 10 years before.
That same year Greg Letarsky hurt himself pretty good when he fell off a bike he was riding. They went to clothing sales and bought a miniature Purple Heart and gave it to him at the cadet dance as a joke. Greg was killed the next year at the IL Wing Flight Encampment in a ultralight accident the one and only year they had ultralights.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on September 08, 2013, 08:47:06 AM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)

Did you have "a hottie" as your flight commander?  ;D

YUP!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on September 09, 2013, 11:05:07 AM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)

Did you have "a hottie" as your flight commander?  ;D

If you know her, tell her we wouldn't have gotten Honor Squadron of the Week with out her.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Nor'easter on September 09, 2013, 03:05:16 PM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)

Did you have "a hottie" as your flight commander?  ;D

If you know her, tell her we wouldn't have gotten Honor Squadron of the Week with out her.

Sure, I'll pass it on. If you could PM your name though, that would be great.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on September 09, 2013, 05:26:08 PM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)

Did you have "a hottie" as your flight commander?  ;D

If you know her, tell her we wouldn't have gotten Honor Squadron of the Week with out her.

Sure, I'll pass it on. If you could PM your name though, that would be great.


will do.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on September 09, 2013, 05:30:47 PM
I went to LDC in PA wing this year and we has a C/2ndLt talk on his sleep during firewatch. He said "if you talk at the position of attention one more time I will tear your heart out." He said a lot of other things, that was just the most memorable.

I believe it! People thought PAWG encampment was strict! >:(     ( :'(   )
You should hear the "shepherds  >:D " of Leadership Development Course!

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: The Happy Sergeant on September 10, 2013, 07:50:22 PM
This didn't happen to me, but another cadet in my squadron. he's at winter eagle one and they have the standard wall lockers, and during white glove(does anyone ELSE have white glove??) the Cadet Commander came up to his locker, opened it, didn't like what he saw, and slammed it.  after he slammed it, the door fell off. the cadet commander looks at the cadet, and says: "i am truly sorry, cadet"
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: captearhart on September 11, 2013, 03:22:04 PM
Last year at encampment, we had a seriously hard core group first sergeant.  One night, I awoke to the sounds of "one two three ONE..."  Wondering what this was, I got up and looked around the barracks, and about three bunks down from me was the first sergeant not only calling PT cadence, but also doing PT in her sleep.

This year, we also had a flight sergeant who would call drill in the middle of the night.  He actually woke up the entire barracks doing it.  The strange thing was, he sounded off better in his sleep than in front of the cadets, but the thing was, he wasn't using his diaphragm in his sleep.  By day 4, he had lost his voice from calling drill while sleeping.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Maj Collins on September 12, 2013, 06:21:30 AM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)
What year did you go? Because that happened at PA LDC next year.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Maj Collins on September 12, 2013, 06:31:46 AM
At my basic encampment in PA wing the first sergeant's name was Chief Markam. The staff called him backpack because he was a small guy that wore a huge backpack wherever he went. For some reason he decided to take our squadron under his wing, and he was harsher with us than our line staff was. But at graduation we earned both Honor Squadron of the week and Medic's Pride of the week, we showed him.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Brad on September 12, 2013, 10:49:15 AM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)

Trying to picture having enough hair in uniform to justify the use of hairspray......

Nope, sorry, divide by zero. Females I could possibly understand though.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on September 12, 2013, 11:00:34 AM
^ Even females - it's going to be contraband at most encampments, anyway.  That much hairspray is going to take forever
to get out of your hair every night, and most days you're in BDUs anyway.

Any necessary securing of hair should be accomplished with pins.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Ned on September 12, 2013, 11:40:20 AM
Any necessary securing of hair should be accomplished with pins.

Really?

Out of all the things I felt I needed to micro-manage as an encampment commander, "how females manage their hair" never made the list.

YMMV.   ;)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on September 12, 2013, 11:45:23 AM
Well, I have also never seen it raised as an issue, nor seen hairspray at an encampment.

If it's actually setting off the carbon monoxide detectors (which I find somewhat apocryphal), then it's clearly a danger to everyone.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on September 12, 2013, 02:00:11 PM
While I have not seen hairspray at encampments, I've smelled it. :)
If I see it, I'm probably someplace I don't want to be at that time..

..or they're going to fail that bunk inspection.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Nor'easter on September 12, 2013, 02:45:36 PM
Well, I have also never seen it raised as an issue, nor seen hairspray at an encampment.

If it's actually setting off the carbon monoxide detectors (which I find somewhat apocryphal), then it's clearly a danger to everyone.

True story, Eclipse. It went beyond that and actually induced sickness to several.

However, I believe there was another factor.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on September 12, 2013, 02:53:34 PM
At the Airshow last weekend, the NJROTC females all had their hair done and hair spray was used to keep the style in place. The Bees/Wasps LOVED IT! Unfortunately, while some would go into the fetal position/shift away, others would try to waive the creatures away. Not five minutes after I asked "Little Boss" what our procedure on bee stings is, I heard the first radio call that a cadet (non-CAP) was stung. Now, I'm Allergic (or at least my mom is, I've never been stung/tested, but she was unable to walk for 3 weeks so...), it can be life or death, and I'd say for next time, LIMIT the hairspray as a safety issue.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on September 12, 2013, 03:24:26 PM
Were they in dress uniforms?

I've always found it odd that the JROTCs send their cadets in dress uniforms to do dirty work.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on September 12, 2013, 05:10:42 PM
Same as the last 5 times I've gone since 2004.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on September 12, 2013, 05:33:22 PM
Same as the last 5 times I've gone since 2004.

Weird - you see CAP cadets in those photos in BDUs, and the JROTC cadets in cracker jack whites, dress uniforms, etc.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: The Happy Sergeant on September 12, 2013, 05:36:20 PM
heres a funny one for you. so we're at cascade falcon XVII and we are waiting in line a the D/FAC, and a line of geese goes marching by. we are out of formation and just milling around and one of the cadets says "HEY, those geese can march better than WE can!!!" we all cracked up laughing, though needless to say our flight staff were not impressed
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Peeka on September 12, 2013, 06:03:16 PM
heres a funny one for you. so we're at cascade falcon XVII and we are waiting in line a the D/FAC, and a line of geese goes marching by. we are out of formation and just milling around and one of the cadets says "HEY, those geese can march better than WE can!!!" we all cracked up laughing, though needless to say our flight staff were not impressed

The word you are searching for is gaggle. Like a gaggle of geese.....  >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on September 12, 2013, 06:04:00 PM
Same as the last 5 times I've gone since 2004.

Weird - you see CAP cadets in those photos in BDUs, and the JROTC cadets in cracker jack whites, dress uniforms, etc.

Actually last year Sea Cadets wore NWUs. First time I saw them in utilities.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on September 12, 2013, 06:10:26 PM
Much more appropriate.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Al Sayre on September 13, 2013, 07:37:56 AM
FWIW, when my daughter was in Army JROTC, they weren't issued BDU's/ABU's until they were in their 3rd year...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Mitchell 1969 on September 13, 2013, 07:21:28 PM
Any necessary securing of hair should be accomplished with pins.

Really?

Out of all the things I felt I needed to micro-manage as an encampment commander, "how females manage their hair" never made the list.

YMMV.   ;)

What's next? Toilet paper should go over or under?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Mitchell 1969 on September 13, 2013, 07:25:52 PM
FWIW, when my daughter was in Army JROTC, they weren't issued BDU's/ABU's until they were in their 3rd year...

Admittedly a LONG time ago, but when I was in AJROTC they did not routinely issue "fatigues" to everyone. Rifle team got them. The only mass issue was to those who signed up for "camp" during Spring break. Can't blame them, as uniforms were a two-way process, issue and turn-in, with mandatory cleaning/laundry after turn-in.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on September 13, 2013, 08:20:49 PM
FWIW, when my daughter was in Army JROTC, they weren't issued BDU's/ABU's until they were in their 3rd year...

Admittedly a LONG time ago, but when I was in AJROTC they did not routinely issue "fatigues" to everyone. Rifle team got them. The only mass issue was to those who signed up for "camp" during Spring break. Can't blame them, as uniforms were a two-way process, issue and turn-in, with mandatory cleaning/laundry after turn-in.

When I was in AFROTC (2003) only the POCs and sophomores going to camp were allowed to wear BDUs. Us GMCs had to wear blues all the time. We also couldn't wear patent leathers until (if) we went to summer camp. Lots of rules regarding uniform wear. Tuck in your shoe laces, can't roll up your BDU sleeves unless you completed summer camp, etc etc...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on September 14, 2013, 01:20:01 PM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)
What year did you go? Because that happened at PA LDC next year.

2013 Encampment. The LDC girls were upstairs. so they had to come out with us when the fire department got there.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on September 14, 2013, 01:24:29 PM
^ Even females - it's going to be contraband at most encampments, anyway.  That much hairspray is going to take forever
to get out of your hair every night, and most days you're in BDUs anyway.

Any necessary securing of hair should be accomplished with pins.

They were really serious about it. We used lots of pins; but they wouldn't accept one wind blown stray hair. So they told us the hairspray bit.
 ::)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on September 14, 2013, 01:26:07 PM
Well, I have also never seen it raised as an issue, nor seen hairspray at an encampment.

If it's actually setting off the carbon monoxide detectors (which I find somewhat apocryphal), then it's clearly a danger to everyone.

True story, Eclipse. It went beyond that and actually induced sickness to several.

However, I believe there was another factor.

Sure was. That same night there was food poisoning. :-\
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on September 14, 2013, 02:00:34 PM
They were really serious about it. We used lots of pins; but they wouldn't accept one wind blown stray hair. So they told us the hairspray bit.

Who's "they"?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on September 14, 2013, 02:18:02 PM
They were really serious about it. We used lots of pins; but they wouldn't accept one wind blown stray hair. So they told us the hairspray bit.

Who's "they"?

The line, and inspection staff. And let me rephrase that, " They seemed really serious about it"    ??? :-X   ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on September 14, 2013, 02:32:03 PM
"They" need to get over themselves.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Maj Collins on September 14, 2013, 03:45:46 PM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)
What year did you go? Because that happened at PA LDC next year.

2013 Encampment. The LDC girls were upstairs. so they had to come out with us when the fire department got there.
I was a student at LDC. You should have seen our staff run around. Now that it is over and no one was seriously hurt. It was a fairly ridiculous situation. Firewatch started to wake everyone up because they knew a barracks evacuation was coming.
Also go to LDC next year.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on September 14, 2013, 04:36:10 PM
Hairspray
I went to PA wing encampment. TD01 Our flight commanders were constantly bellowing at us, "YOUR HAIR LOOKS ATROCIOUS!!, you should use so much hairspray, if you bump your head on your bunk, it won't hurt because you have a HELMET HEAD!  ...Training Day 03, the carbon monoxide detectors were going off. We found out it was from all the hairspray we were using. After that, no hairspray use was aloud inside the barracks.  ::)
What year did you go? Because that happened at PA LDC next year.


2013 Encampment. The LDC girls were upstairs. so they had to come out with us when the fire department got there.
I was a student at LDC. You should have seen our staff run around. Now that it is over and no one was seriously hurt. It was a fairly ridiculous situation. Firewatch started to wake everyone up because they knew a barracks evacuation was coming.
Also go to LDC next year.



uhh... maybe. heh heh  :'(
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Honor Guardsman on September 14, 2013, 05:46:13 PM
So I went to the FLWG winter encampment a few years back. Throught the whole encampment I heard it about how during the infamous inprocessing by the cadet staff. Two of the cadets were twins one a C/Lt Col. and the other a C/CMSgt unknowingly I called the C/Lt Col. a chief because, as I later found out, her and her sister were switching places to screw with cadets seeing that they were twins.

Later I went to a summer encampment and not surprisingly my TSS barracks were known for their voices, by singing Justin timberlake in the shower and accidentally waking the SM staff up. We got so popular that we eventually persuaded the C/Col. to come join us! The events were eventually brought up at the grog and the main guys were groged for it.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Brad on September 15, 2013, 09:54:07 PM
NJROTC doesn't have NWUs, closest thing they have is working khaki, same as Midshipmen wear.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TexasCadet on October 27, 2013, 04:58:57 PM
I might have posted this story; I forget. At my basic encampment, I had two big goof-offs in my flight. One morning, it rained. When we went outside, we fell into formation. Now, since it had rained, naturally there were clouds in the sky. So, one of the goof-offs asked our flight sergeant a question. It went a little like this.

(Cadet raises his hand.)
Chief: Yes, cadet.
Cadet: Chief, can we just look at that cloud for a minute? It looks so pretty.

Everyone burst out laughing (including the chief). It took all my strength not to laugh.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on October 27, 2013, 11:01:56 PM
I might have posted this story; I forget. At my basic encampment, I had two big goof-offs in my flight. One morning, it rained. When we went outside, we fell into formation. Now, since it had rained, naturally there were clouds in the sky. So, one of the goof-offs asked our flight sergeant a question. It went a little like this.

(Cadet raises his hand.)
Chief: Yes, cadet.
Cadet: Chief, can we just look at that cloud for a minute? It looks so pretty.

Everyone burst out laughing (including the chief). It took all my strength not to laugh.

One kid in my flight at my basic was quite the goof off. At one point, we were standing at attention, and it has just rained earlier, so there were a lot of clouds in the sky. So, this kid raises his hand and asks our flight sergeant "Chief, can we look at that cloud for a moment? It looks so pretty." Everyone broke out laughing except me (I can be compared to Spock). "Chief" was not amused.

You had less than 40 posts on this board when you reposted. Is your memory that bad? You do know your post count doesn't mean anything, right?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PA Guy on October 27, 2013, 11:14:11 PM
Cut the cadet some slack. Telling war stories over and over is part of being a cadet.  I'm sure the mods will talk to him if it is a problem.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on October 28, 2013, 12:01:11 AM
Cut the cadet some slack. Telling war stories over and over is part of being a cadet.  I'm sure the mods will talk to him if it is a problem.


That was me cutting him some slack. Over the last few days he's been posting off the hook. Some of it nonsensical.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TexasCadet on October 28, 2013, 11:01:11 AM
I don't care about the little number with how many posts I have. And sure, if the moderators have a problem with it, I'll will stop posting so much. However, before you go blaming me for posting "nonsensical" stuff, look back at some older threads. I'm sure you will find lots of
"nonsensical" stuff.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on October 28, 2013, 11:03:19 AM
Huh?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TexasCadet on October 28, 2013, 11:25:42 AM
Actually, you all are right. I guess I was a little concerned about my post count. It seems people are taken seriously only when their count is high. I will stop posting so much.

However, I honestly forgot whether I posted that story.
Title: Encampment stories
Post by: Storm Chaser on October 28, 2013, 11:43:48 AM
@ TexasCadet

I'm less concerned with your post count and more concerned with your attitude. Would you have replied like that to a senior member Capt in person? Just because you're in an online forum, doesn't mean you get to forget that you're a CAP cadet and should behave accordingly (especially since you're a C/SNCO). Respect, even online, goes a long way.

(Edited for grammar)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Cessna Man on October 31, 2013, 01:09:00 PM
That's no way to talk to a SM let alone a Captain!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TexasCadet on October 31, 2013, 01:15:22 PM
This issue was resolved several days ago via PM.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 14, 2014, 11:34:06 PM
Has anyone else had guidon snatchers? Every year at NJWG Encampment, there is one staff member (usually senior) who steals guidon whenever theyre posted and no ones looking. BEST place to hide guidons? Roll it up and tape it on top of a ceiling fan ;D

Hehehe during relay races at my basic,  guideons were getting stolen like crazy. I remeber walking back from the latrine and seeing Hotel's guiedon proped up randomly against a building. Bravo's guideon dissapeared and when it was finnally found the CS banned stealing lol...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 14, 2014, 11:41:18 PM
At KSWG Encampments, guidon stealing has been outlawed. The only way a guidon can get "snatched" is if it is left by the flight and they don't realize it, a command staff member or senior may grab it up and take it back to Wing HQ (our encampments are at Wing HQ), to sit in the encampment commander's office. It is up to the encampment commander how the flight will get their guidon back. Over the past couple couple years, they have required a letter written by the flight asking for it back and a little bit of groveling. We have also done away with singing to get misplaced items back.

Apperantly singing hasnt been done away with in the Honor Guard flight cuz' we had to sing multiple stupid songs to get our guideon back lol...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 15, 2014, 03:44:50 PM
when it was finnally found the CS banned stealing lol...

As it should be.  The concept of guidon stealing and variations of it (e.g. cadet officer order a cadet to give him the guidon) are frankly pointless.  If a flight posts the guidon and leaves the area, then that is one thing.  However, when a guidon is posted, it is posted and should not need a "guard".
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 15, 2014, 05:41:52 PM
Ok here are some encampment stories from my encampments:

  COWG 2013
 
So, at the beginning of the week , C/XO decides to promote a bright green teddy bear to the rank of C/Col. He literally stuck three diamonds into that bear and made cadets greet it. So, a cadet I know walks down a hallway in the barracks and the XO is standing there with the bear on his shoulder, of all places. She says, " Good Evening Sir." He gets slightly red in the face and, somehow managing to keep stait face, says "Cadet! Do you not see there is a C/Col here (points to the bear) why did you not greet him?!" The cadet manages to stammer out, "Good Evening Gentelmen" and keeps walking down the hallway wth the "WHAT THE H*** JUST HAPPENED?!" look on her face.  ;D ;D ;D ;D PAO staff even pics of the bear with the XO.

I'll start this one by saying that I was sick A LOT at encampment. Like, enough to have spent so much time in Med-Bay that by week's end, I knew the medics better than my own flight. Sweet memories.
My flight sergeant was by far the meanest person at the whole encampment, and the medics knew it. It was the middle of the week, I was lying in Medical with half a dozen ailments, and my FS walks in and tells the medics to make her tea. The C/NCIOC makes her tea. She takes it and leaves. Not 15 seconds later she's back complaining that it's too hot. CNCOIC puts cold water in it. Gives it back. (By this time he's pretty p***ed). She leaves and then comes saying that it's too cold. The cycle reapeats once more before the FS gives it to the CNCIOC and says she'll be back in a minute to pick it up. Well, partially out of anger and prtially to make me feel better, the C/NCOIC takes a salt shaker and holds it over the cup for a good 20 seconds. FS comes back, takes it. Leaves without tasting. She didn't come back to complain  >:D >:D ;D ;D :D ;D >:D >:D

 Inside jokes of COWG 2013:
   
     (Insert randon question here/) "That would be the KC-135 Sir!"
      The KC-135  (the universal answer to everything)
      What doesn't kill you makes you stronger, but then, you don't know what makes you stronger until you're already dead.
      Chief Lemmon   (you really have to have been there to get it)

  Inside jokes of KSWG 2013-2014

    "Does this flag meet your standards most noble grand duke of awesomeness?"  (duke a.k.a. Honor Guard XO/armouer/first sergeant)
    Special snowflake!
    Would you like fries with that?
    Propoganda Chief
    That rifle is 10% of your body weight.
 
  Stories from KSWG Encampment and Honor Guard ATF 2013-2014

I'm sitting on the van at he end of the week, waiting to leave for Colorado and there's a guy, from my home squadron, who starts talking about how IOs found boot knives in his combat boots during an inspection and how he had no [/dramticly/] idea how they got in there. You don't just 'not notice' knives in your boots! Anyways he started whining over how the encampment turned them over to the police dept. and how he wasn't getting them back....

I was in the HGATF and the C/HG Commander decides to do this thing called 'Morning Moto'. moto as in motovation. For future reference, the Lady Rebels are JROTC group; As part of our punishment for leaving our guideon, we had to watch their drill comp. video. It wasn''t 'bad' preformance-wise, they were coordinated and everything, it was their routine. We called it a 'stomp comp'. Our eyes were close to bleeding by the time the video ended. It you look up  Lady Rebels JROTC Drill Compition you should find the video. So anyways Moring Moto went like this:
"Good morning Honor Guard!" S
"Good morning Captain Smith"(name changed to protect privacy) C
"Honor!" S
"Makes the grass grow!" C
"Drill!" S
"Makes the blood flow!" C
"My guard!" S
"Your guard!" C
"Civil Air Patrol!" S
"Honor Guard!" C
"AAAAAAAAAAHHHH!!!!!" S
"AARRHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!" C
"(Insert barbaric yell/scream here) !!!!!!!!" S
"(Insert LOUDER barbaric yell/scream here) !!!!!!!!!!!!" C
"We ain't logistics-Hooah?!" S
"HOOAH!" C
"We ain't Command staff-Hooah?!" S
"HOOAH!!!" C
"We ain't admin-Hooah?!" S
"HOOAH!" C
"We ain't basics-Hooah?!" S
"HOOAH!" C
"And we SURE ain't the Lady Rebels-HOOAH?!!!" S
"HOOOOAAHH!!!!!" S
"FALL OUT!" C
"DRILL!" S
 ;D ;D ;D ;D :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: ;D 8) 8) 8) 8)
 
more to come
   
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 15, 2014, 08:23:35 PM
Ok so I looked up the video and from youtube.com its Lady Rebels Unarmed Exihbition
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Fubar on January 16, 2014, 12:14:32 AM
So...... not a lot of adult supervision at the COWG encampment?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on January 16, 2014, 02:36:08 AM
when it was finnally found the CS banned stealing lol...

As it should be.  The concept of guidon stealing and variations of it (e.g. cadet officer order a cadet to give him the guidon) are frankly pointless.  If a flight posts the guidon and leaves the area, then that is one thing.  However, when a guidon is posted, it is posted and should not need a "guard".


Steal a guidon at a CAWG Encampment and you will be on your way home by COB that day.

We have a zero tolerance policy for that kind of crap.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 16, 2014, 12:20:11 PM
So...... not a lot of adult supervision at the COWG encampment?

I didnt mean that. There is a lot of adult supervision.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 16, 2014, 12:20:59 PM
It was mainly staff stealing each other's guideons.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PA Guy on January 16, 2014, 12:56:26 PM
It was mainly staff stealing each other's guideons.

It is still a silly practice, especially if it is cadet staff.  Cadet staff constantly complain about not having enough training time yet they seem to have time for childish and silly games. What training goal does this accomplish? 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Panache on January 16, 2014, 01:16:41 PM
It was mainly staff stealing each other's guideons.
What training goal does this accomplish?

Tactical acquisition.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: UH60guy on January 16, 2014, 02:33:01 PM
I was more concerned about the flight sergeant abusing the authority of her position for personal gain to order other cadets to make her tea. Seems harmless enough, but there's zero training value, has nothing to do with the position, and shows that she has a general sense of entitlement. I've always hated the saying "rank has it privelages" because that mentality only leads to trouble.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 16, 2014, 02:37:56 PM
If you're too sick at encampment to participate, you go home, not spend several days in the "Med-Bay".

Same goes for any other CAP activity.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MSG Mac on January 16, 2014, 03:39:31 PM
I was more concerned about the flight sergeant abusing the authority of her position for personal gain to order other cadets to make her tea. Seems harmless enough, but there's zero training value, has nothing to do with the position, and shows that she has a general sense of entitlement. I've always hated the saying "rank has it privelages" because that mentality only leads to trouble.

Young lady is lucky she didn't get ipecac in her tea or Ex-lax brownies.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on January 16, 2014, 06:00:09 PM
I was more concerned about the flight sergeant abusing the authority of her position for personal gain to order other cadets to make her tea. Seems harmless enough, but there's zero training value, has nothing to do with the position, and shows that she has a general sense of entitlement. I've always hated the saying "rank has it privelages" because that mentality only leads to trouble.

Young lady is lucky she didn't get ipecac in her tea or Ex-lax brownies.

 >:D >:D >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TexasCadet on January 16, 2014, 06:01:30 PM
when it was finnally found the CS banned stealing lol...

As it should be.  The concept of guidon stealing and variations of it (e.g. cadet officer order a cadet to give him the guidon) are frankly pointless.  If a flight posts the guidon and leaves the area, then that is one thing.  However, when a guidon is posted, it is posted and should not need a "guard".

One squadron at Texas Wing's Winter Encampment 2013 left their squadron guidon at their barracks while they were at the dining facility. It was stolen because they forgot it. The dining facility and the barracks were about a half-mile apart.

[cut]
Well, partially out of anger and prtially to make me feel better, the C/NCOIC takes a salt shaker and holds it over the cup for a good 20 seconds. FS comes back, takes it. Leaves without tasting. She didn't come back to complain  >:D >:D ;D ;D :D ;D >:D >:D
[/cut]

Isn't tampering with food illegal? I'm not saying the flight sergeant didn't deserve it, but maybe there was a better way to deal with the situation.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 16, 2014, 06:31:53 PM
when it was finnally found the CS banned stealing lol...

As it should be.  The concept of guidon stealing and variations of it (e.g. cadet officer order a cadet to give him the guidon) are frankly pointless.  If a flight posts the guidon and leaves the area, then that is one thing.  However, when a guidon is posted, it is posted and should not need a "guard".

One squadron at Texas Wing's Winter Encampment 2013 left their squadron guidon at their barracks while they were at the dining facility. It was stolen because they forgot it. The dining facility and the barracks were about a half-mile apart.

Let me clarify one thing.  "Stealing guidons" regardless of the reason is stupid.  Grabbing the guidon because someone left it at a training site for the purpose of returning it to the chain of command for proper counseling (not running around yelling "I LOST THE GUIDON") is appropriate.  Or better yet, do the right thing and give it back to the flight's TAC officer to handle.  Leaving the guidon at the barracks is a proper method of securing the guidon since there is not exactly a "squadron area" to post the guidon all day.

I understand how fun it can be "stealing guidons" and having cadets running around yelling "I LOST THE GUIDON".  I had a bad mentor when I was a cadet and made a lot of stupid mistakes.  I have since corrected myself.  Passing on the knowledge and life lesson, the concept of it is simply just pointless and provides has no training objectives.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 16, 2014, 08:40:16 PM
I was more concerned about the flight sergeant abusing the authority of her position for personal gain to order other cadets to make her tea. Seems harmless enough, but there's zero training value, has nothing to do with the position, and shows that she has a general sense of entitlement. I've always hated the saying "rank has it privelages" because that mentality only leads to trouble.

She left CAP anyways, so it'd not really a big deal anymore....
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 16, 2014, 08:41:52 PM
If you're too sick at encampment to participate, you go home, not spend several days in the "Med-Bay".

Same goes for any other CAP activity.

Overnight once and few hours on different days.... In my opinion that's not enough to go back...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 16, 2014, 08:43:13 PM
when it was finnally found the CS banned stealing lol...

As it should be.  The concept of guidon stealing and variations of it (e.g. cadet officer order a cadet to give him the guidon) are frankly pointless.  If a flight posts the guidon and leaves the area, then that is one thing.  However, when a guidon is posted, it is posted and should not need a "guard".

One squadron at Texas Wing's Winter Encampment 2013 left their squadron guidon at their barracks while they were at the dining facility. It was stolen because they forgot it. The dining facility and the barracks were about a half-mile apart.

[cut]
Well, partially out of anger and prtially to make me feel better, the C/NCOIC takes a salt shaker and holds it over the cup for a good 20 seconds. FS comes back, takes it. Leaves without tasting. She didn't come back to complain  >:D >:D ;D ;D :D ;D >:D >:D
[/cut]

Isn't tampering with food illegal? I'm not saying the flight sergeant didn't deserve it, but maybe there was a better way to deal with the situation.

You're probably right, but it's water under the bridge now.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 16, 2014, 09:24:44 PM
Overnight once and few hours on different days.... In my opinion that's not enough to go back...

Even the few hours is probably more then it should be, there isn't even supposed to be a "Med Bay".
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Mitchell 1969 on January 17, 2014, 12:42:46 AM
Ok here are some encampment stories from my encampments:

  COWG 2013
 
So, at the beginning of the week , C/XO decides to promote a bright green teddy bear to the rank of C/Col. He literally stuck three diamonds into that bear and made cadets greet it.
 

They made an 11-year old the C/XO?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Panache on January 17, 2014, 12:55:37 AM
Isn't tampering with food illegal? I'm not saying the flight sergeant didn't deserve it, but maybe there was a better way to deal with the situation.

I doubt that dumping table salt, a food item, into somebody's tea is "illegal". 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PA Guy on January 17, 2014, 11:18:56 AM
If you're too sick at encampment to participate, you go home, not spend several days in the "Med-Bay".

Same goes for any other CAP activity.

Overnight once and few hours on different days.... In my opinion that's not enough to go back...

AACS Cadet,

You need to go read CAPR 52-16 chap 9. The mandated curriculum is forty hours. You must complete 80% of the mandated training to  receive encampment credit. Do the math.  That doesn't leave much time to visit "Med Bay" for a "few hours on different days".

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 17, 2014, 01:16:00 PM
Ok here are some encampment stories from my encampments:

  COWG 2013
 
So, at the beginning of the week , C/XO decides to promote a bright green teddy bear to the rank of C/Col. He literally stuck three diamonds into that bear and made cadets greet it.
 

They made an 11-year old the C/XO?

No, he was like, 17 or something.. IDK
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 17, 2014, 01:16:49 PM
If you're too sick at encampment to participate, you go home, not spend several days in the "Med-Bay".

Same goes for any other CAP activity.

Overnight once and few hours on different days.... In my opinion that's not enough to go back...


AACS Cadet,

You need to go read CAPR 52-16 chap 9. The mandated curriculum is forty hours. You must complete 80% of the mandated training to  receive encampment credit. Do the math.  That doesn't leave much time to visit "Med Bay" for a "few hours on different days".

Actually I HAVE read it and I DID complete 80% or more of encampment.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: fokkerfrenzy on January 17, 2014, 01:31:35 PM
OKWG Encampment 98, one evening I laid down on my rack after a day in the field with my legs draped over the bar at the end.  I was still in full BDUs boots and all.  Everyone else changed and went to bed.  They chose that night for a fire drill, so I woke up (never meant to fall asleep that way) to alarms and yelling of directions.  Everyone rushed outside, and went to formations.  I caught the eye of the command staff, and had the privilege(?) of being front and centered and explaining in front of 2 flights why I felt the need to be in full battle dress while everyone else was in PT sleep gear. 

Looking back, I always chuckle about it, but at the time it was a "don't see me, don't see me, don't see me... crap, they saw me" moments.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 17, 2014, 05:11:35 PM
Sweet, sweet memories huh?  :clap: ;)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 17, 2014, 05:20:54 PM
OKWG Encampment 98, one evening I laid down on my rack after a day in the field with my legs draped over the bar at the end.  I was still in full BDUs boots and all.  Everyone else changed and went to bed.  They chose that night for a fire drill, so I woke up (never meant to fall asleep that way) to alarms and yelling of directions.  Everyone rushed outside, and went to formations.  I caught the eye of the command staff, and had the privilege(?) of being front and centered and explaining in front of 2 flights why I felt the need to be in full battle dress while everyone else was in PT sleep gear. 

Looking back, I always chuckle about it, but at the time it was a "don't see me, don't see me, don't see me... crap, they saw me" moments.

So you had a Flight Sgt, Flight CC, not to mention at least one TAC who all just ignored you at lights out...

See how this works?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TexasCadet on January 17, 2014, 08:23:47 PM
Some stories from admin at TXWG Winter Encampment 2013:

One cadet had the first name "Benjamin" but signed it "Joe".

Another cadet switched between "Benjamin" and "Cooper".

On one cadet's CAPF 31, his signature and his parents' signatures looked the same.

One cadet didn't know he was supposed to bring paperwork to encampment.

A lot of cadets didn't bring complete paperwork or current CAP IDs.

The things that admin has to deal with...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: thatonecadet on January 17, 2014, 08:53:48 PM
There's always those few cadets who bring squadron caps to a wing* encampment...


*NOT PAWG  ;)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on January 17, 2014, 11:04:16 PM
There's always those few cadets who bring squadron caps to a wing* encampment...


*NOT PAWG  ;)


They're instructed to in CAWG because we will be giving them a Cadet Training Squadron cap when they in process.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 17, 2014, 11:42:46 PM
The things that admin has to deal with...

I used to love when the CC's signed page was a clearly a single faxed or scanned page,
sometimes from a different version of the form, making it clear the CC had never reviewed,
or even seen, the actual app.

Then the cadet shows up sans meds, not a member, etc., etc.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 18, 2014, 01:47:59 AM
AACS Cadet,

You need to go read CAPR 52-16 chap 9. The mandated curriculum is forty hours. You must complete 80% of the mandated training to  receive encampment credit. Do the math.  That doesn't leave much time to visit "Med Bay" for a "few hours on different days".

You might want to go back and look as well. 

Quote from: CAPP 52-24
The typical encampment that runs for 7 days, including travel days, will yield roughly 60 to 65 possible contact hours, excluding meals, sleep, travel, and personal time. Note that only 42 contact hours are mandatory, so a “short” encampment of perhaps 5 days is feasible, or alternatively, a “typical” encampment of 7 days has opportunities to include plenty of electives, extra tours, extra hands-on activities and the like.

Also

Quote from: CAPP 52-24
Members of these groups earn encampment participation credit through their active participation in 34 contact hours (roughly 80% of the minimum 42 contact hours), adhering to the Core Values, and successfully fulfilling their duty assignment, in the judgment of the encampment commander.

So it is possible for a cadet to spend a few hours in "medical bay" each day and still graduate as long as he maintains 34 hours of the required 42 hours of the possible 60 hours.  Besides, CAP leaves this 80% up to the judgement of the encampment commander.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on January 18, 2014, 02:20:48 AM
Yet I constantly hear summer encampment staff complaining about not enough time...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on January 18, 2014, 02:35:33 AM
But Winter has enough time? :)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Panache on January 18, 2014, 04:47:09 AM
But Winter has enough time? :)

Well, winter certainly feels longer...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 18, 2014, 11:13:04 AM
And i wasn't in Med-Bay EVERY day....
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: fokkerfrenzy on January 18, 2014, 12:36:51 PM
So you had a Flight Sgt, Flight CC, not to mention at least one TAC who all just ignored you at lights out...

See how this works?


I never thought of it that way, but yes I suppose so... Huh, now I'm wracking my brain to try to remember who that was.  I only remember the FS, though.  Ah well.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 18, 2014, 02:39:16 PM
Yet I constantly hear summer encampment staff complaining about not enough time...

Yeah, I have heard that as well.  The encampments I have been too, the problem usually is a result of a lot of "hurry up and wait" planning.  You would be surprised how much time this eats up.

For this reason, I like the position of TAC officer.  I know a lot of encampments put new SM that have no encampment history as TAC officers, but I think this is a disservice.  Especially in the 2000s.  The TAC officer should be working on mentoring the flight sergeant, flight commander, and element leaders and not just making sure the flight does not die.  When I see my flight standing around waiting on something or have "down-time", I pull aside the flight commander and/or sergeant and ask them what they could be doing.  Hip-pocket training is a wonderful tool for cadets to learn.   
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 18, 2014, 04:29:12 PM
^ This is not the role of the TACS, that is the role of the Line staff.   At most someone should be pinging the line staff and having them
do the reminding about hip pocket stuff.

The problem when TACs insert themselves is that it robs a cadet of the opportunity to lead / manage, etc.

For the most part, the issue with encampment structure is the failure of the staff to have good schedules walking in the door.
Far too much is being done on the fly, or the night before at 2330, in fact, if cadet staff finds the need to have "staff meetings"
for anything more then 5-minute status updates, that's a real problem.

The 6+ months leading up to the activity is when this planning needs to be done, and the schedule needs to be modular and nimble
enough to accommodate when a resource or activity is delayed or changed.

Hopefully the updated curriculum requirements, coupled with the required rest times will fix a lot of this.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 18, 2014, 04:47:04 PM
^ This is not the role of the TACS, that is the role of the Line staff.   At most someone should be pinging the line staff and having them
do the reminding about hip pocket stuff.

The problem when TACs insert themselves is that it robs a cadet of the opportunity to lead / manage, etc.

Well National seems to disagree with you:

Quote
Training Officers. Formerly known as tactical officers, training officers are assigned to each flight at an encampment. Training officers are CAP senior members who are the cadets’ first-line adult leaders. They also fulfill a critical role as mentors to the cadets, particularly the flight staff. Assistant training officers are assigned as available. Senior training officers are also assigned as available, and serve at the squadron level and supervise flight-level training officers. In large encampments, a chief training officer supervises the full team of training officers and provides guidance and mentor- ing to newcomers. This position’s major functional areas include:
• Ensuring the cadets’ safety, health and well-being
• Observation, training, mentoring, and evaluation of flight staff
• Observation, training, and evaluation of students
• Ensuring that the encampment’s curriculum and learning goals are progressing as expected
• Personal counseling of cadets, as necessary
• Responsible stewardship of resources, whether belonging to CAP or the host facility

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 18, 2014, 04:52:52 PM
You know you're quoting from draft documents that are new and not yet in force, right?

Things change and evolve, and people have to adjust.

Make sure the commandant and encampment commander are on the same page in regards to your mentoring level.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 18, 2014, 05:12:35 PM
You know you're quoting from draft documents that are new and not yet in force, right?

Things change and evolve, and people have to adjust.

Make sure the commandant and encampment commander are on the same page in regards to your mentoring level.

It has not created a problem yet.  In fact, I seem to get a lot of compliments on my interaction with the cadets and how I mentor them.  For the encampments that I have attended, the senior TAC officer has also recommended the mentoring.

But since you did assert that is not the role of a TAC officer, what is your citation to the proper role of the TAC officer at encampment?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Cool on January 18, 2014, 06:05:12 PM
Last year's encampment, staff couldn't find on of their cadets. They checked everywhere and finally they heard something and opened a locker and he was standing there naked trying to change his clothes... He hollered "don't look at me, I'm naked".
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 18, 2014, 06:12:12 PM
But since you did assert that is not the role of a TAC officer, what is your citation to the proper role of the TAC officer at encampment?

My CP master badge and my 11-encampment ribbons, 8 of which were as the activity commander.

Up until the draft encampment guide, there essentially was no definition of "TAC".  My assertion is based on successful experience coupled
with consultation with any number of other encampment commanders, staff, and national SMEs.

The draft assets to refer to them as "Training officers", which would also insinuate that there needs to be a level of experience
and knowledge there that is beyond most 1st year / 1st time senior members at an encampment, so I'm not sure how that is
going to be reconciled.  Hopefully through some specific training for the TO's themselves, outside the activity.

Previous to the draft, "TAC" could mean anything from "Teach / Advise / Counsel" to "Tactical" and anything in between.
The best-course was to pair two TACs, one "new" one "seasoned" and teach the to be generally "like the wind", meaning
the "see all, and say little".

Far too many new senior members involved with cadets, especially those with prior military, want to step in and start directly
training, which in an encampment is not appropriate except for specific situations where an adult's skill needs to be imparted.
Something lost at many of these larger activities is that the training is for all the cadets, staff to student, and adults being too
directly involved with them robs the line staff of their own learning environment.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 18, 2014, 06:32:22 PM
My CP master badge and my 11-encampment ribbons, 8 of which were as the activity commander.

Fallacy:  appeal to authority. 

Quote
Up until the draft encampment guide, there essentially was no definition of "TAC".  My assertion is based on successful experience coupled
with consultation with any number of other encampment commanders, staff, and national SMEs.
opinion

I helped shorten that sentence down for you.  So if there was "essentially no definition of TAC" then you cannot assert that is not the role of a TAC officer.  It may not be a role in your opinion, but in my opinion it is a role. 

thank you for your opinion.  I have noted it, but have rejected it.  Moving on.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 18, 2014, 07:00:33 PM
Yes, by all means dismiss informed experience when it conflicts with your opinion.

That seems to be a mantra for many members.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 18, 2014, 07:22:49 PM
Yes, by all means dismiss informed experience when it conflicts with your opinion.

That seems to be a mantra for many members.

No, I have not dismissed your informed experience.  I have dismissed your opinion just as much as you have dismissed my opinion.  Neither of us have a citation from an authoritative source (read as NHQ approved publication) that defines the role of the TAC officer.  Therefore, regardless of experience, they remain as opinions.  The only evidence that both of us have is anecdotal evidence, which is at best unverifiable and subjective. 

If you think I should bow down to you because  "My CP master badge and my 11-encampment ribbons, 8 of which were as the activity commander.", then I do not know what to tell you other than I do not accept the "argument from authority".

Have a nice day
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on January 18, 2014, 07:57:37 PM
LST,

And what is your experience?

If you have none or no CP program experience, and no CP track, I will bow down to the BTDT.  As a matter of fact, because he has been in there...

Flyer
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 18, 2014, 08:07:53 PM
LST,

And what is your experience?

If you have none or no CP program experience, and no CP track, I will bow down to the BTDT.  As a matter of fact, because he has been in there...

Flyer

Master CP with about 15 years experience in CP.  All of which does not matter.  Claims stand or fall by their own merit, not by the person making those claims.  Even if he had 40 years and I had 4 years, there is still no authoritative basis for our opinions.  As such they remain as opinions.  Being in a program longer does not make a claim true unless you have physical evidence to back up those claims.  Simply saying "I am right because I have X, Y, Z" is simply not an argument.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on January 18, 2014, 10:26:05 PM
The role of the TAC or Training Officer is one of the more difficult ones to fill. The TAC(for brevities sake) has to walk a fine line between being a "totem pole" standing around and not doing anything except as someone said "making sure the cadets don't die" and the "eager beaver" who jumps in to every situation as soon as he sees the cadet staff having difficulty or being indecisive. The TAC has to be willing to let the cadets make their mistakes and make them in such a way that they learn from them. If they work through their problem without needing assistance, the TAC should note the situation and query the cadets about it at a later time to make sure that they absorbed the lesson that the problem was teaching them. If they cannot work through the problem, the TAC should help them work through the problem solving process not give them the answer or take over the situation. It takes a bit of experience to know when to let the situation develop or to provide assistance. The only time a TAC should directly intervene is when it involves health, safety, sanitation, or cadet protection issues including hazing. All other seniors who are not directly working with cadets should work through the Commandant of Cadets if they have issues or questions about things the cadets are doing or not doing.

At our encampment, the scheduling framework for 2014 was done before the end of the 2013 encampment. There will be tweeks and changes but for the most part our schedules vary little from year to year. The longevity of some of the staff accounts for some of this. The fact that we have been using the same venue for several years also helps standardize our schedules. In fact a lot of the admin work is "plug and play" and involves mostly changing dates on forms. Every day our operations section puts out a schedule and incident action plan for the next day. It is usually ready by 1600hrs the day before if not sooner.

I remember encampments years ago where we had nearly 300 "call" visits in a week and anytime you walked into the med bay there were several cadets lying around in various states of "puny". Fortunately, we have made changes to the program that make the medical needs of the encampment extremely minimal. We have not had a med bay in several years and have not had any medical issues that lasted more than a couple of hours at the most. We have had cadets get hurt and go to the ER and we have had cadets go home for medical reasons but not very many and almost none in the last 5-8 years.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 19, 2014, 01:13:46 AM
The role of the TAC or Training Officer is one of the more difficult ones to fill. The TAC(for brevities sake) has to walk a fine line between being a "totem pole" standing around and not doing anything except as someone said "making sure the cadets don't die" and the "eager beaver" who jumps in to every situation as soon as he sees the cadet staff having difficulty or being indecisive.

snipped to save space

All other seniors who are not directly working with cadets should work through the Commandant of Cadets if they have issues or questions about things the cadets are doing or not doing.

I agree 100%.  I think it is a disservice to the cadets when encampment commanders put new SM with no experience in these positions.  The TAC should be well-versed on appropriate methods of mentoring (which includes letting cadets make their own mistakes) and know when to indirectly involve themselves.  This was my interactions with TACs in the military.  They knew when to directly intervene, when to pull you said and guide to the correct direction, and when to just let you make your own mistake.

When I was in ROTC (scary phrase I know), I went against the direction of my TAC officer (O-4).  The O-4 pulled me aside and told me I should not waste our time having a class on crew-served weapons, call for artillery, and cleaning the barracks.  Our platoon had two cadets that did exactly that in the AD Army, so I disagreed and explained why I felt those were necessary.  He looked at me with disapproval and simply said "it is your call".  In the end it paid off as we took best platoon in those two events plus got high remarks for the condition of our barracks.  It was a major gamble and he was more than willing to let me learn my mistake. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Mitchell 1969 on January 19, 2014, 01:57:01 AM
You know you're quoting from draft documents that are new and not yet in force, right?


And you're quoting....what, exactly, when you claim otherwise?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 19, 2014, 02:03:57 AM
You know you're quoting from draft documents that are new and not yet in force, right?


And you're quoting....what, exactly, when you claim otherwise?

Already answered above, I'm not quoting anything, nor is it necessary.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Mitchell 1969 on January 19, 2014, 02:04:51 AM
You know you're quoting from draft documents that are new and not yet in force, right?


And you're quoting....what, exactly, when you claim otherwise?

Withdrawn. I just caught up with the thread. Badge, ribbons, etc. Got it. You're quoting from nothing, finding fault with somebody who quoted from something, citing your experiential opinion as out weighing somebody else's.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 26, 2014, 10:02:13 PM
OK, so I have another one:

  So I wake up at like 2:00 am and hear my battle-buddy muttering, "is founded upon respect fuhr and loyal coop................" and then, "w-while putting aside personal respec......"     At the time I was mad that'd I'd been woken up but now it's just funny! Even more so because she was wrong! ;D  Also, I woke up one night doing To-the-Rear in my sleep, almost fell of the top bunk  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D That would've hurt...  :o
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on January 27, 2014, 12:23:59 AM
So, you would have learned the difference between being "dismissed" and "falling out". ;)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 27, 2014, 12:33:30 AM
So, you would have learned the difference between being "dismissed" and "falling out". ;)

Exactly.  ;D ;) ;D
Actually I almost did fall out of closing one night due to heat exauhstion...  ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Cindi on January 27, 2014, 01:22:49 PM
Back in 1968, Oregon Wing had our encampment at Fairchild Air Force Base, a SAC base then, located near Spokane, Washington. Our transportation from Portland was on some C-119s, the old Flying Boxcars or Flying Coffins as they were known then. Cadets were seated against the sides of the plane with the luggage in the middle so everyone could see everybody else.
The flight was very turbulent and riding in the Flying Boxcar was very noisy. There was a garbage can in the back of the plane. My buddy was near the back acting like he was trying to sleep with a spoon sticking out of his flight jacket. My job was to act like I was really getting sick from all the turbulence, which was not that hard to do. I had a barf bag prepared in advance with beef stew in it. As I saw several people looking at me, I decided it was time. Grabbing the barf bag and covering my mouth, I put on a good show of barfing my guts out. When I was finished, I handed the barf bag to the person next to me to hand from one person to another down the line to be put in the garbage can in the back of the plane. It seemed all eyes were on the barf bag and as it made its way to my buddy he said thanks and took his spoon out of his flight jacket and proceeded to eat the beef stew in the barf bag. Seeing him eat that barf (beef stew), several cadets on the other side of the plane just let go and I can still remember that awful smell coming from our barf encrusted luggage.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: FlyTiger77 on January 27, 2014, 05:31:19 PM
It seemed all eyes were on the barf bag and as it made its way to my buddy he said thanks and took his spoon out of his flight jacket and proceeded to eat the beef stew in the barf bag. Seeing him eat that barf (beef stew), several cadets on the other side of the plane just let go and I can still remember that awful smell coming from our barf encrusted luggage.

Sounds similar to the opening scene of a great movie from the '70s or '80s. "C'mon, hogs, chow's on me!" (Can anyone name the movie?)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on January 27, 2014, 06:37:10 PM
The Great Santini
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on January 27, 2014, 06:38:08 PM
It seemed all eyes were on the barf bag and as it made its way to my buddy he said thanks and took his spoon out of his flight jacket and proceeded to eat the beef stew in the barf bag. Seeing him eat that barf (beef stew), several cadets on the other side of the plane just let go and I can still remember that awful smell coming from our barf encrusted luggage.

Sounds similar to the opening scene of a great movie from the '70s or '80s. "C'mon, hogs, chow's on me!" (Can anyone name the movie?)
The Great Santini.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: FlyTiger77 on January 27, 2014, 10:35:49 PM

The Great Santini.


The Great Santini

Yup. One of the better movies.

If you ever get a chance, find on-line The Great Santini's eulogy by Pat Conroy. It is outstanding.


***We will now return you to your regularly scheduled Encampment Stories, already in progress!***
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on January 27, 2014, 10:41:54 PM
Back in 1968, Oregon Wing had our encampment at Fairchild Air Force Base, a SAC base then, located near Spokane, Washington. Our transportation from Portland was on some C-119s, the old Flying Boxcars or Flying Coffins as they were known then. Cadets were seated against the sides of the plane with the luggage in the middle so everyone could see everybody else.
The flight was very turbulent and riding in the Flying Boxcar was very noisy. There was a garbage can in the back of the plane. My buddy was near the back acting like he was trying to sleep with a spoon sticking out of his flight jacket. My job was to act like I was really getting sick from all the turbulence, which was not that hard to do. I had a barf bag prepared in advance with beef stew in it. As I saw several people looking at me, I decided it was time. Grabbing the barf bag and covering my mouth, I put on a good show of barfing my guts out. When I was finished, I handed the barf bag to the person next to me to hand from one person to another down the line to be put in the garbage can in the back of the plane. It seemed all eyes were on the barf bag and as it made its way to my buddy he said thanks and took his spoon out of his flight jacket and proceeded to eat the beef stew in the barf bag. Seeing him eat that barf (beef stew), several cadets on the other side of the plane just let go and I can still remember that awful smell coming from our barf encrusted luggage.

Cream of Mushroom soup works much better! >:D


Not that I would know..... :angel:
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 28, 2014, 12:36:49 PM
Back in 1968, Oregon Wing had our encampment at Fairchild Air Force Base, a SAC base then, located near Spokane, Washington. Our transportation from Portland was on some C-119s, the old Flying Boxcars or Flying Coffins as they were known then. Cadets were seated against the sides of the plane with the luggage in the middle so everyone could see everybody else.
The flight was very turbulent and riding in the Flying Boxcar was very noisy. There was a garbage can in the back of the plane. My buddy was near the back acting like he was trying to sleep with a spoon sticking out of his flight jacket. My job was to act like I was really getting sick from all the turbulence, which was not that hard to do. I had a barf bag prepared in advance with beef stew in it. As I saw several people looking at me, I decided it was time. Grabbing the barf bag and covering my mouth, I put on a good show of barfing my guts out. When I was finished, I handed the barf bag to the person next to me to hand from one person to another down the line to be put in the garbage can in the back of the plane. It seemed all eyes were on the barf bag and as it made its way to my buddy he said thanks and took his spoon out of his flight jacket and proceeded to eat the beef stew in the barf bag. Seeing him eat that barf (beef stew), several cadets on the other side of the plane just let go and I can still remember that awful smell coming from our barf encrusted luggage.

Cream of Mushroom soup works much better! >:D


Not that I would know..... :angel:



Yeah, but beef stew tastes better!  ;D 




Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TexasCadet on January 28, 2014, 06:28:11 PM
Back in 1968, Oregon Wing had our encampment at Fairchild Air Force Base, a SAC base then, located near Spokane, Washington. Our transportation from Portland was on some C-119s, the old Flying Boxcars or Flying Coffins as they were known then. Cadets were seated against the sides of the plane with the luggage in the middle so everyone could see everybody else.
The flight was very turbulent and riding in the Flying Boxcar was very noisy. There was a garbage can in the back of the plane. My buddy was near the back acting like he was trying to sleep with a spoon sticking out of his flight jacket. My job was to act like I was really getting sick from all the turbulence, which was not that hard to do. I had a barf bag prepared in advance with beef stew in it. As I saw several people looking at me, I decided it was time. Grabbing the barf bag and covering my mouth, I put on a good show of barfing my guts out. When I was finished, I handed the barf bag to the person next to me to hand from one person to another down the line to be put in the garbage can in the back of the plane. It seemed all eyes were on the barf bag and as it made its way to my buddy he said thanks and took his spoon out of his flight jacket and proceeded to eat the beef stew in the barf bag. Seeing him eat that barf (beef stew), several cadets on the other side of the plane just let go and I can still remember that awful smell coming from our barf encrusted luggage.

Cream of Mushroom soup works much better! >:D


Not that I would know..... :angel:



Yeah, but beef stew tastes better!  ;D 






Perhaps oatmeal? >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 28, 2014, 07:12:25 PM
Back in 1968, Oregon Wing had our encampment at Fairchild Air Force Base, a SAC base then, located near Spokane, Washington. Our transportation from Portland was on some C-119s, the old Flying Boxcars or Flying Coffins as they were known then. Cadets were seated against the sides of the plane with the luggage in the middle so everyone could see everybody else.
The flight was very turbulent and riding in the Flying Boxcar was very noisy. There was a garbage can in the back of the plane. My buddy was near the back acting like he was trying to sleep with a spoon sticking out of his flight jacket. My job was to act like I was really getting sick from all the turbulence, which was not that hard to do. I had a barf bag prepared in advance with beef stew in it. As I saw several people looking at me, I decided it was time. Grabbing the barf bag and covering my mouth, I put on a good show of barfing my guts out. When I was finished, I handed the barf bag to the person next to me to hand from one person to another down the line to be put in the garbage can in the back of the plane. It seemed all eyes were on the barf bag and as it made its way to my buddy he said thanks and took his spoon out of his flight jacket and proceeded to eat the beef stew in the barf bag. Seeing him eat that barf (beef stew), several cadets on the other side of the plane just let go and I can still remember that awful smell coming from our barf encrusted luggage.

Cream of Mushroom soup works much better! >:D


Not that I would know..... :angel:



Yeah, but beef stew tastes better!  ;D 






Perhaps oatmeal? >:D



Pea Soup?   >:D >:D >:D >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TexasCadet on January 28, 2014, 07:15:37 PM
Back in 1968, Oregon Wing had our encampment at Fairchild Air Force Base, a SAC base then, located near Spokane, Washington. Our transportation from Portland was on some C-119s, the old Flying Boxcars or Flying Coffins as they were known then. Cadets were seated against the sides of the plane with the luggage in the middle so everyone could see everybody else.
The flight was very turbulent and riding in the Flying Boxcar was very noisy. There was a garbage can in the back of the plane. My buddy was near the back acting like he was trying to sleep with a spoon sticking out of his flight jacket. My job was to act like I was really getting sick from all the turbulence, which was not that hard to do. I had a barf bag prepared in advance with beef stew in it. As I saw several people looking at me, I decided it was time. Grabbing the barf bag and covering my mouth, I put on a good show of barfing my guts out. When I was finished, I handed the barf bag to the person next to me to hand from one person to another down the line to be put in the garbage can in the back of the plane. It seemed all eyes were on the barf bag and as it made its way to my buddy he said thanks and took his spoon out of his flight jacket and proceeded to eat the beef stew in the barf bag. Seeing him eat that barf (beef stew), several cadets on the other side of the plane just let go and I can still remember that awful smell coming from our barf encrusted luggage.

Cream of Mushroom soup works much better! >:D


Not that I would know..... :angel:



Yeah, but beef stew tastes better!  ;D 






Perhaps oatmeal? >:D



Pea Soup?   >:D >:D >:D >:D

Pea soup is kind of watery, but it has those nice little bits of peas it. Oatmeal, while it doesn't have any chunks, make a great splat sound. >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 28, 2014, 08:02:56 PM
Back in 1968, Oregon Wing had our encampment at Fairchild Air Force Base, a SAC base then, located near Spokane, Washington. Our transportation from Portland was on some C-119s, the old Flying Boxcars or Flying Coffins as they were known then. Cadets were seated against the sides of the plane with the luggage in the middle so everyone could see everybody else.
The flight was very turbulent and riding in the Flying Boxcar was very noisy. There was a garbage can in the back of the plane. My buddy was near the back acting like he was trying to sleep with a spoon sticking out of his flight jacket. My job was to act like I was really getting sick from all the turbulence, which was not that hard to do. I had a barf bag prepared in advance with beef stew in it. As I saw several people looking at me, I decided it was time. Grabbing the barf bag and covering my mouth, I put on a good show of barfing my guts out. When I was finished, I handed the barf bag to the person next to me to hand from one person to another down the line to be put in the garbage can in the back of the plane. It seemed all eyes were on the barf bag and as it made its way to my buddy he said thanks and took his spoon out of his flight jacket and proceeded to eat the beef stew in the barf bag. Seeing him eat that barf (beef stew), several cadets on the other side of the plane just let go and I can still remember that awful smell coming from our barf encrusted luggage.

Cream of Mushroom soup works much better! >:D


Not that I would know..... :angel:



Yeah, but beef stew tastes better!  ;D 






Perhaps oatmeal? >:D



Pea Soup?   >:D >:D >:D >:D

Pea soup is kind of watery, but it has those nice little bits of peas it. Oatmeal, while it doesn't have any chunks, make a great splat sound. >:D

True  >:D >:D ;) >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on January 28, 2014, 08:52:04 PM
Apparently, this is a pretty common trick. A buddy of mine went on IACE to the UK and they did that on a RAF C-130. In that instance, they used hot coffee and the loadmaster at the back drank straight from the bag. :P
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 28, 2014, 09:24:19 PM
Apparently, this is a pretty common trick. A buddy of mine went on IACE to the UK and they did that on a RAF C-130. In that instance, they used hot coffee and the loadmaster at the back drank straight from the bag. :P

 :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D :clap: :clap: :clap:
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on January 28, 2014, 11:54:26 PM
Our favorite target was new Med Techs and Flight Nurses. They were just so darn trusting. >:D

And you could count on plenty of help from their fellow Flight Nurses and Med Techs too! :o
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on January 29, 2014, 12:02:20 AM
Our favorite target was new Med Techs and Flight Nurses. They were just so darn trusting. >:D

And you could count on plenty of help from their fellow Flight Nurses and Med Techs too! :o

At KSWG we picked on Logistics & admin  >:D >:D >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Awesomenesss on January 29, 2014, 12:53:48 AM
Is there anybody on here that went to the Nebraska wing encampment?

If so share a story?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Brit_in_CAP on January 29, 2014, 11:22:17 AM
Apparently, this is a pretty common trick. A buddy of mine went on IACE to the UK and they did that on a RAF C-130. In that instance, they used hot coffee and the loadmaster at the back drank straight from the bag. :P

Former RAF guy comment: yep, absolutely.  Also worked well in Nimrod MR1, MR2 with UK Air Cadets on board at Annual Camp....apparently muesli was the favored item then....apparently 'cos being a ground pounder I wouldn't know about these things.... :angel:

Actually, as the Air Cadet Liaison Officer for encampment I might have had some insight.. >:D  That said, the ACLO was a great collateral job, to be honest.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on January 29, 2014, 07:49:13 PM
 :clap:
Apparently, this is a pretty common trick. A buddy of mine went on IACE to the UK and they did that on a RAF C-130. In that instance, they used hot coffee and the loadmaster at the back drank straight from the bag. :P

Former RAF guy comment: yep, absolutely.  Also worked well in Nimrod MR1, MR2 with UK Air Cadets on board at Annual Camp....apparently muesli was the favored item then....apparently 'cos being a ground pounder I wouldn't know about these things.... :angel:

Actually, as the Air Cadet Liaison Officer for encampment I might have had some insight.. >:D  That said, the ACLO was a great collateral job, to be honest.
:clap: :clap:

Is Davies a common name in the UK. We used to have a member here in IL that came to encampment for several years named Deb Davies. She had a wonderfully pleasant British accent.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Brit_in_CAP on January 30, 2014, 10:31:36 AM
It is, as my wife attests, a very common name in the UK!  Strictly, my spelling - Davies - is Welsh and the English version is Davis.  I also have a very pleasant accent, apparently... ;D

I did some research when I first joined CAP, using CAPTALK.  There are quite a lot of Brits in the CAP, one of whom comes from a place very close to where I grew up.  So far, I'm the only one I know of who has regular duty time in one of the British Armed Services although I have encountered, via CAPTALK, several who, like me, have 'prior service' in the Air Training Corps.  Small world.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: cadeteaster13 on February 02, 2014, 05:07:45 AM
Ok, everyone share some stories from encampment. War stories, something amusing, or something you thought was odd or interesting.

So we had just got out of DFAC early and were studying our SOP's. When the cadet next to me raises his hand,

Basic: "Sergeant Permission to adjust"

FS:"Adjust what?"

Basic:"My Pants"

FS:"Why?"
 :-[ ::)
Basic: "There's a fly in them" ??? :o



Turns out when he put on his BDU bottoms a fly got trapped in there haha :clap: :clap: :) ;) :D ;D :o 8) ::)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on February 02, 2014, 11:55:56 AM
Ok, everyone share some stories from encampment. War stories, something amusing, or something you thought was odd or interesting.

So we had just got out of DFAC early and were studying our SOP's. When the cadet next to me raises his hand,

Basic: "Sergeant Permission to adjust"

FS:"Adjust what?"

Basic:"My Pants"

FS:"Why?"
 :-[ ::)
Basic: "There's a fly in them" ??? :o



Turns out when he put on his BDU bottoms a fly got trapped in there haha :clap: :clap: :) ;) :D ;D :o 8) ::)


 ;D ;D ;D ;D :o :o :o :o ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on February 02, 2014, 04:29:06 PM
I forget if I posted this already but here goes:

So one night during formation, one of the TACOs, an Army guy who'd just turned senior, runs through formation with a plastic iron-man mask on.  ;D ;D 8) 8) Later, he ran around the squadron building with it on. He also visted med-bay  ;D ;D ;D ;D 8) 8) 8) ;D ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on February 02, 2014, 07:04:03 PM
But was he wearing a PT belt? 8)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: arajca on February 02, 2014, 07:56:48 PM
I forget if I posted this already but here goes:

So one night during formation, one of the TACOs, an Army guy who'd just turned senior, runs through formation with a plastic iron-man mask on.  ;D ;D 8) 8) Later, he ran around the squadron building with it on. He also visted med-bay  ;D ;D ;D ;D 8) 8) 8) ;D ;D
IIRC, after encampment, he was asked to not return until he matured.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on February 02, 2014, 07:59:53 PM
I forget if I posted this already but here goes:

So one night during formation, one of the TACOs, an Army guy who'd just turned senior, runs through formation with a plastic iron-man mask on.  ;D ;D 8) 8) Later, he ran around the squadron building with it on. He also visted med-bay  ;D ;D ;D ;D 8) 8) 8) ;D ;D
IIRC, after encampment, he was asked to not return until he matured.

He was allowed to stay the whole week?  :o
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on February 02, 2014, 08:40:07 PM
On a more serious note, that is one of the problems with many TACs. They are often given the duty as their first duty at encampment and too often they are not supervised properly or mentored in the job. Also, seniors who have just "come over to the dark side" after service as a cadet should not work with cadets directly for their first year or two after going over.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on February 02, 2014, 11:05:50 PM
Also, seniors who have just "come over to the dark side" after service as a cadet should not work with cadets directly for their first year or two after going over.


Maybe.        I've seen some who have had no problem with the transition and then there are others who will never make the transition from Cadet to Senior.
This is something that pretty much needs to be handled on a case by case basis.

It goes without saying that they should be supervised pretty heavy their first year at Encampment as a Senior.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on February 02, 2014, 11:42:41 PM
I forget if I posted this already but here goes:

So one night during formation, one of the TACOs, an Army guy who'd just turned senior, runs through formation with a plastic iron-man mask on.  ;D ;D 8) 8) Later, he ran around the squadron building with it on. He also visted med-bay  ;D ;D ;D ;D 8) 8) 8) ;D ;D
IIRC, after encampment, he was asked to not return until he matured.

He was joking, and yes, he happened to be one of the best TACOs the encampment had
He was allowed to stay the whole week?  :o
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on February 03, 2014, 01:24:02 AM
^^^^

Any chance you can fix the quotes on this so we can se which part is really yours?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on February 03, 2014, 01:56:07 AM
^^^^

Any chance you can fix the quotes on this so we can se which part is really yours?


The line "He was joking...".
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on February 03, 2014, 01:59:13 AM
This is a teachable moment. you're spoiling it.  :(
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: ol'fido on February 03, 2014, 08:35:33 AM
Also, seniors who have just "come over to the dark side" after service as a cadet should not work with cadets directly for their first year or two after going over.


Maybe.        I've seen some who have had no problem with the transition and then there are others who will never make the transition from Cadet to Senior.
This is something that pretty much needs to be handled on a case by case basis.

It goes without saying that they should be supervised pretty heavy their first year at Encampment as a Senior.
Yes, and there will be exceptions to every rule and this rule is no exception. However, I have seen cadets who transitioned and would not have a problem working with cadets again immediately who imposed this rule on themselves because they understood why we did it in many cases and were good enough leaders to realize that they should set the example for their former peers who might not be ready to supervise cadets as a senior member.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: AACS Cadet21 on February 03, 2014, 12:00:26 PM
^^^^

Any chance you can fix the quotes on this so we can se which part is really yours?
Sorry, won't let me
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: blackbrandt on May 01, 2014, 03:49:19 PM
Funniest encampment story...

Florida 2013 summer encampment.  Sitting in one of the barracks, listening to a class.  I am sitting on the lower bunk of a bunk bed.  The 5 seconds after the class sounded like this.

Class Teacher: ...and that is all I have.
Me: ROOM TEN HUT!!
*BANG*

Everyone stares at the source of the bang.  Me.

That massive bang was me forgetting that I was on the bottom bunk...  And that bunks don't move for heads...


Naturally, the entire squadron burst out laughing...  I was fine...  It was a funny experience though...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: THRAWN on May 02, 2014, 07:36:36 AM
Funniest encampment story...

Florida 2013 summer encampment.  Sitting in one of the barracks, listening to a class.  I am sitting on the lower bunk of a bunk bed.  The 5 seconds after the class sounded like this.

Class Teacher: ...and that is all I have.
Me: ROOM TEN HUT!!
*BANG*

Everyone stares at the source of the bang.  Me.

That massive bang was me forgetting that I was on the bottom bunk...  And that bunks don't move for heads...


Naturally, the entire squadron burst out laughing...  I was fine...  It was a funny experience though...

It did, apparently, impact your ability to spell sergeant correctly...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SpectreHog on May 04, 2014, 09:04:50 PM
Encampment story from about a week ago...

So after lights out, a cadet was whistling and it was really bothering me. I decided to "sush" the cadet.

After the "sush," one of the senior members asked who it was. The cadet remained quiet and never fessed up.

At the second weekend, me and a few other cadets in my flight confronted the cadet about this. His reply is the funny part.

His reply:

"It was a ghost."
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Mitchell 1969 on May 08, 2014, 01:40:17 AM
As I browsed through some of these stories, a truism was definitely and clearly reinforced in my mind:

"You had to have been there."
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on May 08, 2014, 09:02:11 AM
Encampment story from about a week ago...

So after lights out, a cadet was whistling and it was really bothering me. I decided to "sush" the cadet.

After the "sush," one of the senior members asked who it was. The cadet remained quiet and never fessed up.

At the second weekend, me and a few other cadets in my flight confronted the cadet about this. His reply is the funny part.

His reply:

"It was a ghost."

Airman Wilson, in the future, please upline these issues, not "confront", anyone. Charlie TAC Officer would have been a good place to start. Congrats on winning the drill comp by the way.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SpectreHog on May 08, 2014, 11:01:04 AM
Encampment story from about a week ago...

So after lights out, a cadet was whistling and it was really bothering me. I decided to "sush" the cadet.

After the "sush," one of the senior members asked who it was. The cadet remained quiet and never fessed up.

At the second weekend, me and a few other cadets in my flight confronted the cadet about this. His reply is the funny part.

His reply:

"It was a ghost."

Airman Wilson, in the future, please upline these issues, not "confront", anyone. Charlie TAC Officer would have been a good place to start. Congrats on winning the drill comp by the way.

Sorry about that. Since we had our flight commander talk to him, we didn't feel it was necessary to jump the chain of command.

Thanks for the congrats Sir by the way.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SilentPhantom on May 10, 2014, 09:03:27 PM
At my encampments we called the Saftey Staff Safety Nazis and picked on logistics and admin... I'm going to summer encampments and at one, the GFS's last name is Houston. When something goes wrong, I'm gonna shout, "Houston we have a problem!" :D counting the days still staff training starts.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on May 11, 2014, 03:26:32 AM
It would do you well, to be more like your screen name - silent. "Houston we have a problem!" will wear out very quickly.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PA Guy on May 11, 2014, 04:19:30 AM
At my encampments we called the Saftey Staff Safety Nazis and picked on logistics and admin... I'm going to summer encampments and at one, the GFS's last name is Houston. When something goes wrong, I'm gonna shout, "Houston we have a problem!" :D counting the days still staff training starts.

What is a GFS?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SilentPhantom on May 11, 2014, 11:11:01 AM
At my encampments we called the Saftey Staff Safety Nazis and picked on logistics and admin... I'm going to summer encampments and at one, the GFS's last name is Houston. When something goes wrong, I'm gonna shout, "Houston we have a problem!" :D counting the days still staff training starts.

What is a GFS?

Group First Sergeant a.k.a. Command Chief
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on May 11, 2014, 12:45:48 PM
At my encampments we called the Saftey Staff Safety Nazis and picked on logistics and admin... I'm going to summer encampments and at one, the GFS's last name is Houston. When something goes wrong, I'm gonna shout, "Houston we have a problem!" :D counting the days still staff training starts.

What is a GFS?

Group First Sergeant a.k.a. Command Chief

no AKA needed. Just Group First Sgt.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SilentAntidote on May 12, 2014, 06:26:56 PM
Encampment story from about a week ago...

So after lights out, a cadet was whistling and it was really bothering me. I decided to "sush" the cadet.

After the "sush," one of the senior members asked who it was. The cadet remained quiet and never fessed up.

At the second weekend, me and a few other cadets in my flight confronted the cadet about this. His reply is the funny part.

His reply:

"It was a ghost."

Airman Wilson, in the future, please upline these issues, not "confront", anyone. Charlie TAC Officer would have been a good place to start. Congrats on winning the drill comp by the way.

Sorry about that. Since we had our flight commander talk to him, we didn't feel it was necessary to jump the chain of command.

Thanks for the congrats Sir by the way.


Ah. I remember hearing about this. Alright, anyone else have any Spring Encampment 2014 Stories?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SilentPhantom on June 03, 2014, 02:50:21 PM
I went to encampment for an Honor Guard ATF (after my basic encampment, of course) and we had M1 Grands. So one morning at like 5:30, we're out marching to PT, it was still dark out and we were all wearing black with our rifles at port arms; one of the Cadet HG ATF COs walks up and says, 'You guys look like a Navy SEAL team." It doesn't really sound that funny in text, but at the time it was hilarious. Also, at my basic encampment, I heard a rumor that my Squadron CC's boxers got run up the flag pole; but then, I heard it in Med-Bay so it probably wasn't true...  ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on June 03, 2014, 03:48:23 PM
Heck, I am pretty sure that at 0530 after waking up anything would have sounded hilarious!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SilentPhantom on June 03, 2014, 04:01:11 PM
Heck, I am pretty sure that at 0530 after waking up anything would have sounded hilarious!

True lol  ;D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MSG Mac on June 03, 2014, 04:28:30 PM
At my encampments we called the Saftey Staff Safety Nazis and picked on logistics and admin... I'm going to summer encampments and at one, the GFS's last name is Houston. When something goes wrong, I'm gonna shout, "Houston we have a problem!" :D counting the days still staff training starts.

What is a GFS?

Group First Sergeant a.k.a. Command Chief

CAP does not have a Cadet grade of Command Chief Master  Sergeant
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on June 04, 2014, 01:37:33 AM
I went to encampment for an Honor Guard ATF (after my basic encampment, of course) and we had M1 Grands Garand.

FTFY.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on June 04, 2014, 01:39:37 AM
At my encampments we called the Saftey Staff Safety Nazis and picked on logistics and admin... I'm going to summer encampments and at one, the GFS's last name is Houston. When something goes wrong, I'm gonna shout, "Houston we have a problem!" :D counting the days still staff training starts.

What is a GFS?

Group First Sergeant a.k.a. Command Chief

CAP does not have a Cadet grade of Command Chief Master  Sergeant

Nor does the AF. It's a position, not a grade. Only at the highest levels do the command E-9s get a little extra pay.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spartan on July 27, 2014, 09:12:00 PM
So no crap, there I am during a dress uniform inspection toward the end of my basic encampment. I had decided I wanted to look sharp recently and used shirt garters to keep my shirt tucked in better. When the encampment commander, a bear of a major came to ask me a question, the right front garter let go of my sock. There was a conspicuous "thwack" sound followed closely by a groan.  The commander says to me, "Cadet, did your shirt garter fail on you?" All I could muster was another groan.

The lesson of the story folks; make sure your shirt garters are secure on a part of your shirt that will not hurt if one let's go of your sock.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: RogueLeader on July 27, 2014, 09:17:40 PM
So no crap, there I am during a dress uniform inspection toward the end of my basic encampment. I had decided I wanted to look sharp recently and used shirt garters to keep my shirt tucked in better. When the encampment commander, a bear of a major came to ask me a question, the right front garter let go of my sock. There was a conspicuous "thwack" sound followed closely by a groan.  The commander says to me, "Cadet, did your shirt garter fail on you?" All I could muster was another groan.

The lesson of the story folks; make sure your shirt garters are secure on a part of your shirt that will not hurt if one let's go of your sock.

That's why I only use the ones that go around the leg, and not attach to the sock.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on July 27, 2014, 10:36:19 PM
The lesson of the story folks; make sure your shirt garters are secure on a part of your shirt that will not hurt if one let's go of your sock.

http://captalk.net/index.php?topic=325.msg4908#msg4908 (http://captalk.net/index.php?topic=325.msg4908#msg4908)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on July 27, 2014, 11:14:10 PM
Not at an Encampment but at an Airshow...

At an airshow in 2000 or so, at Scotia or Schenectady NY a Naval Aviator wearing railroad tracks stepped out of an F-14. I address him as Captain. Twice. He corrects me nicely with "I am a Lieutenant."

 :-[

This summer my squadron is meeting with another that meets at a US Marine Corps Reserve compound. As I was passing one Marine in a corridor last Saturday meeting he looks at my railroad tracks and addresses me as "Lieutenant." Payback time! But I did not have the heart to correct him...

 ::)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on July 28, 2014, 01:14:18 AM
So no crap, there I am during a dress uniform inspection toward the end of my basic encampment. I had decided I wanted to look sharp recently and used shirt garters to keep my shirt tucked in better. When the encampment commander, a bear of a major came to ask me a question, the right front garter let go of my sock. There was a conspicuous "thwack" sound followed closely by a groan.  The commander says to me, "Cadet, did your shirt garter fail on you?" All I could muster was another groan.

The lesson of the story folks; make sure your shirt garters are secure on a part of your shirt that will not hurt if one let's go of your sock.

No, the lesson is to wear the "Y" type that are on the outside of the leg. Nothing under tension anywhere near the crotch.
Safety First! >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on July 28, 2014, 10:54:21 AM
Not at an Encampment but at an Airshow...

At an airshow in 2000 or so, at Scotia or Schenectady NY a Naval Aviator wearing railroad tracks stepped out of an F-14. I address him as Captain. Twice. He corrects me nicely with "I am a Lieutenant."

 :-[

This summer my squadron is meeting with another that meets at a US Marine Corps Reserve compound. As I was passing one Marine in a corridor last Saturday meeting he looks at my railroad tracks and addresses me as "Lieutenant." Payback time! But I did not have the heart to correct him...

 ::)

You're lucky. The Marines I've encountered barely register our presence. At my last encampment, a group was walking past me and one glanced at me, gave me the " 'sup, brah?" head nod and kept walking.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on July 28, 2014, 01:12:14 PM
I guess so. Maybe the fact that another squadron meets on the compound.

The guard at the gate, sometimes in the car I show without the BDU blouse or hat but wearing the black shirt. Present my CAP ID and they let me pass without a salute.

The first day I was there this summer I showed up wearing the blouse, presented my CAP ID he asked "are all CAP personnel issued that ID?" I answered "yes," he saluted. Another time I was wearing my uniform waiting for the guard or OOD he arrived with his keys and saluted me...

But again when they salute me it may be because 1) we have another squadron and 2) there is also a detachment of Sea Cadets.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Reader5567 on August 06, 2014, 09:57:43 AM
I was at Tri-Wing Encampment 2014, and one cadet called the Chief "Chiefy", and the Chief thought I did it. Another cadet came out of the showers naked and instead of drying off, ran through the barracks naked.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on August 06, 2014, 10:23:13 AM
And...?

What happened in both events? You do not have a complete story...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Reader5567 on August 06, 2014, 03:29:17 PM
Sorry. I had to explain to the chief that it was not me in the first one.

The second guy didn't get in trouble, our line staff were laughing their heads off.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on August 06, 2014, 03:46:57 PM
So in the second case it was like drying dishes, or sometimes laundry, air-dry only?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on August 06, 2014, 03:49:28 PM
Another cadet came out of the showers naked and instead of drying off, ran through the barracks naked.

The second guy didn't get in trouble, our line staff were laughing their heads off.

For those scoring at home, and especially considering the new, more specific, and conservative Protection Policies,
this is the kind of "fun" that could result in x-members.

It's not even out of the question that behavior like this could get you, the staff involved, or even the entire >event<
kicked out of the facility you're using, maybe permanently.

I am not exaggerating.  I still have visions of a PO flying over a desk armed with
a BMT-Day 1-level "knock it off" when he caught sight of a cadet changing in the compartments - rule is no one is undressed
outside of the heads - even though this was an all-male compartment and he was just down to his shorts.

I have to sit down for a minute just >thinking< about what a Chief would do if he caught a cadet streaking through the bay.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Reader5567 on August 06, 2014, 03:49:58 PM
So in the second case it was like drying dishes, or sometimes laundry, air-dry only?

Yeah. Pretty much.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Trenzalorian on August 06, 2014, 09:17:31 PM
So, at the recent 2014 NYWG Encampment, I was on Services. One day, the power in all of the Schenectady area went out. No power anywhere in the entire city, including the whole base where the encampment was. Because the base Services staff was having difficulties starting up the generator to run the two massive walk-in freezer/refrigerators that stored all of our food, lunch was delayed by an hour. It just so happens that while I was on my break, puttsing around, I found out that a person working in the Aeromed building (Where the death by powerpoints were held. It had an auditorium of sorts and offices for the people who actually worked there. Apparently, there were people working there and they brought their 3 month old puppy, Maggie, with them to work. You can see her from 8:43-8:46. Thats's just one great story.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Wentler on August 22, 2014, 08:56:46 PM
So this summer at Camp Ripely I attended an Advanced Leadership Course, the first in the nation, at the 2014 MNWG Encampment. Probably the funniest moment was on the seventh day when we were changing from out BDUs to Blues when suddenly my friend got up from his bunk and started running up and down the bay while yelling. For about 10 seconds nobody could figure out what was wrong with him - until I noticed a Chief insignia stuck completely in his butt. Another good time was when we broke into small groups for some combat building clearing training with the SEALS we got to train with throughout the week. Our instructor decided to demonstrate how to properly kick in a door, when he kicked it so hard literally shattered and broke off a hinge. He looked at it, muttered "Oops", and told us "It's the the Army's problem now".
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: NC Hokie on August 22, 2014, 09:34:12 PM
Another good time was when we broke into small groups for some combat building clearing training with the SEALS we got to train with throughout the week. Our instructor decided to demonstrate how to properly kick in a door, when he kicked it so hard literally shattered and broke off a hinge. He looked at it, muttered "Oops", and told us "It's the the Army's problem now".

You guys need to get him one if these if he doesn't already have one:

http://www.lapolicegear.com/maledopanewi.html (http://www.lapolicegear.com/maledopanewi.html)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: CAP_truth on August 23, 2014, 01:20:44 AM
CLASSIFIED
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: lcaron24 on October 19, 2014, 06:53:15 PM
It was our first night at encampment (MIWG Summer 2013). It was raining when we went to bed so we all slept good. It was about 11 at night and we hear everybody yelling, "In the bathroom, everybody in the bathroom". We have no idea what's going on. Some of us on the top bunks fell getting out of bed. The rain that came through earlier was part of a bigger, slower storm that had an embedded tornado in it. We didn't know this until the last night at the party that we had.

The next night we had a fire drill. We had just gone to bed. On the TAC officers radios we hear, "The meat is spicy, I repeat the meat is spicy!". The meat we had for dinner was spicy so I figure a cadet got a hold of a radio. WRONG!!!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: lcaron24 on October 19, 2014, 06:55:29 PM
Another good time was when we broke into small groups for some combat building clearing training with the SEALS we got to train with throughout the week. Our instructor decided to demonstrate how to properly kick in a door, when he kicked it so hard literally shattered and broke off a hinge. He looked at it, muttered "Oops", and told us "It's the the Army's problem now".

  :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Mitchell 1969 on November 03, 2014, 02:06:49 AM
It was our first night at encampment (MIWG Summer 2013). It was raining when we went to bed so we all slept good. It was about 11 at night and we hear everybody yelling, "In the bathroom, everybody in the bathroom".

They actually called it a "bathroom?"
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Pulsar on November 03, 2014, 05:46:27 PM
It was our first night at encampment (MIWG Summer 2013). It was raining when we went to bed so we all slept good. It was about 11 at night and we hear everybody yelling, "In the bathroom, everybody in the bathroom".

They actually called it a "bathroom?"

 (http://icons.iconarchive.com/icons/emoticonshd.com/emoji/48/Emoticon-Jaw-Dropped-Shock-icon.png)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: MSG Mac on November 03, 2014, 08:08:29 PM
If they called it a latrine, half the cadets would be wandering around asking "What's a Latrine"?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Nor'easter on November 03, 2014, 08:59:07 PM
If they called it a latrine, half the cadets would be wandering around asking "What's a Latrine"?

We do... and they do.  ::)
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: a2capt on November 04, 2014, 02:14:41 AM
..and at the end of the day, that's pointless. Want to do something useful? Give some introduction to jargon, and concentrate on the real reason you're there, not play FMJ Ermey style.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spaceman3750 on January 18, 2015, 09:46:08 PM

FMJ Ermey style.

I didn't realize that he was an actual DI (in a past life anyways) until I watched some BuzzFeed video from Facebook, nor that a pretty good chunk of his lines were ad-libbed.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Afbrat52 on January 21, 2015, 05:25:19 PM
Does breaking one's collarbone on Tuesday and making it to Sunday count as an interesting story?  Fun week...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 21, 2015, 05:31:02 PM
Does breaking one's collarbone on Tuesday and making it to Sunday count as an interesting story?  Fun week...

Well, it constitutes a 78 and should have been a ride home, anyway...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Afbrat52 on January 21, 2015, 07:27:45 PM
It got the 78... But I didn't go home. Since the bone wasn't displaced, it was diagnosed by the med staff as a sprained shoulder. It took an x-ray for anyone (including our family doctor) to realize it was broken. But I had a great time, none the less.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 21, 2015, 07:38:56 PM
It got the 78... But I didn't go home. Since the bone wasn't displaced, it was diagnosed by the med staff as a sprained shoulder. It took an x-ray for anyone (including our family doctor) to realize it was broken. But I had a great time, none the less.

Wow - a text book example of "don't", literally.  Your example should be in the encampment manual.

You were one good trip and fall from becoming a case study in any number of areas.

Thankfully you are apparently OK, let those reading from this take a lesson.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Afbrat52 on January 21, 2015, 07:43:07 PM
Was diagnosed the wrong word?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on January 21, 2015, 08:24:11 PM
I think Eclipse means they were not supposed to diagnose if they are not doctors.

Basically they were there to provide First Aid such as ice and immobilization, and recommend further action. The recommendation should have been, AFbrat needs to see a doctor. The doctor as a precaution would have asked for X-Rays. Just to rule out a fracture...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 21, 2015, 08:28:10 PM
I think Eclipse means they were not supposed to diagnose if they are not doctors.

Basically they were there to provide First Aid such as ice and immobilization, and recommend further action. The recommendation should have been, AFbrat needs to see a doctor. The doctor as a precaution would have asked for X-Rays. Just to rule out a fracture...

Correct - they aren't supposed to diagnose even if they are MDs - 911 or the nearest immediate care center.
The regs make that clear and the updated encampment guide makes it even more clear, assuming it's been read.

To punctuate the tale, their "diagnoses" was >wrong<, probably because they didn't have the appropriate equipment.
I don't know how old AFbrat is, but anyone with adolescent or pre-teen children knows how serious "minor"
injuries can be because of growth plates and related developmental problems.  BTDT.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on January 21, 2015, 08:34:24 PM
Collarbones support the muscles that move the arms. And are in front of the lungs. Many complications can originate from that. What if there was a lung puncture? Since you were walking with a broken collarbone that complication could have happened any time in any activity. Orientation flight with a punctured lung? Major emergency as the air pressure differential could have affected your lung(s) would have deflated your lung(s) very quickly.

I am sure many, many others can point out other complications.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on January 21, 2015, 08:40:33 PM
Based on the comments this was probably a hairline fracture - the kind of thing that might even go undiagnosed
absent the right angle of the X-ray.  It's the subsequent injury that could have been a real problem - horsing
around in the barracks, trip over a broom, fall out of bed, whatever.

Then the questions start being asked about "Tuesday" and why the cadet was still there.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LTCinSWR on January 21, 2015, 08:44:24 PM
To punctuate the tale, their "diagnoses" was >wrong<, probably because they didn't have the appropriate equipment.
I don't know how old AFbrat is, but anyone with adolescent or pre-teen children knows how serious "minor"
injuries can be because of growth plates and related developmental problems.  BTDT.

I haven't seen an encampment with an X-Ray machine, nor are there any reports of a guy in tights and red cape flying by. If there is reduced motion, splint / sling and swath as appropriate and off to the ER they go!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: lordmonar on January 21, 2015, 08:52:09 PM
The applicable regulation is CAPR  160-1

Quote
1-6. Medical Care Policy.
a. CAP is not a health care provider, and CAP members are not permitted to act in the role of health care providers during the performance of official CAP duties. Consequently, CAP members are not permitted to function as pharmacists, physicians, nurses, or in any other role that would permit the administration and dispensing of drugs under various federal and state laws and regulations.
b. Medical care within CAP is limited to emergency first aid and may be provided only by members with appropriate training and experience. Such care shall continue only until professional medical care can be obtained.
c. Any member can assist another member in distress in order to save the life of the member. Members are encouraged to inform activity leadership, health service officers, those in direct contact with the member of their condition, and critical information for support that may be needed. Should any CAP member be required by law to render aid by virtue of his or her professional credential or state license (such as a paramedic or emergency medical technician, for example), such CAP member in complying with his or her legal obligations shall be deemed to be doing so either as the agent of his or her employer or as an agent of the state agency that issued his or her license, but in no event as the agent of CAP.
d. CAP members providing emergency first aid will inform first responders, like emergency medical services, what they have done so that further care is not hindered. All occurrences must be documented in accordance with CAPR 62-2, Mishap Reporting and Review.]/quote]

While this reg and other differ in some of their language.....and while I did not see the events nor have all the information.   What was posted here gives the impression that 160-1 could have been violated.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Afbrat52 on January 21, 2015, 09:40:51 PM
It is very rare for a fractured clavicle to not be displaced. I had an excellent range of motion, which is also very uncommon for a fractured clavicle. I believe that the medical staff acted correctly in icing it and putting it in a sling for a few days.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on January 21, 2015, 09:51:41 PM
It is very rare for a fractured clavicle to not be displaced. I had an excellent range of motion, which is also very uncommon for a fractured clavicle. I believe that the medical staff acted correctly in icing it and putting it in a sling for a few days.

No they didn't. They exceeded their authority. The rule today is if there is any doubt, it's off to Urgant Care/ER where the Doctors can make the call.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: RogueLeader on January 23, 2015, 12:29:46 AM
2014 Wyoming Wing Encampment at Camp Guernsey.  A nice cool morning, with my legs flying barely 50' off the ground, moving around the canyons.  The Blackhawk ride was the best part, other than seeing the growth in the Cadets.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on January 23, 2015, 01:11:34 AM
2014 Wyoming Wing Encampment at Camp Guernsey.  A nice cool morning, with my legs flying barely 50' off the ground, moving around the canyons.  The Blackhawk ride was the best part, other than seeing the growth in the Cadets.

Oh Camp Guernsey.  My company started a wildfire there some years back.  Apparently, the range operations officer forgot to mention how dry the land was before we started a live fire convoy operation.  Apparently our 249s with tracers started the brush fire.  Some unfortunate engineer company and aviation company got the pleasure of putting it out for us after it got out of hand.  It was fun to watch the MEDEVACs carrying water buckets. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: go4spaatz on January 23, 2015, 02:37:29 PM
2013 OHWG Encapment. They cancelled the NCOS last-minute and I went back as a basic anyway. 2nd Day got pulled to replace Alpha Flt's Flight Sergeant. Last year of gender-specific flights, and Alpha was female. Apparently no one told my flight my first name, so every evening when they were preparing the squad bay for inspection, I sat on the floor and shined my boots/shoes while they guessed my name. They finally found out after graduation.

2013 was at Camp Ravenna, with long squad bays, and a cadet hurt himself (possibly broke his leg) falling out of the top bunk in the morning (no guardrails). Not funny then, but now it elicits a chuckle.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: CadetSnuffy on February 05, 2015, 10:54:11 AM
2013 was at Camp Ravenna, with long squad bays, and a cadet hurt himself (possibly broke his leg) falling out of the top bunk in the morning (no guardrails). Not funny then, but now it elicits a chuckle.
That's a big reason why KSWG encampment doesn't let cadets bunk on the top bunk.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: go4spaatz on February 06, 2015, 11:23:34 AM
That's a big reason why KSWG encampment doesn't let cadets bunk on the top bunk.

We had tons of problems with no place to hang uniforms, we had to buy ~130 plastic totes because there were no footlockers or anything...OHWG has stuck with Wright Patterson AFB ever since.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Afbrat52 on February 06, 2015, 04:44:08 PM
The Texas Wing Winter Encampment had footlockers, but almost none of them had poles in them... Rope works wonders. Thankfully, our locker spacing wasn't counted when we didn't have a pole.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PA Guy on February 07, 2015, 02:20:52 AM
The Texas Wing Winter Encampment had footlockers, but almost none of them had poles in them... Rope works wonders. Thankfully, our locker spacing wasn't counted when we didn't have a pole.

Don't confuse footlockers with wall lockers. Big difference.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Afbrat52 on February 13, 2015, 09:04:30 PM
My bad. Read that wrong.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Sergeant_Setsuda on July 02, 2015, 11:22:30 AM
In my NCOS year at MIWG encampment, there was this cadet who every time they saw a staff member greeted them. In fact they greeted too much...enough that the lieutenants in charge of NCOS started to greet that airman as it became a race to greet each other. By the second to last day one of the lieutenants made a rule to prevent her from using further customs and courtesies. That cadet also fell out of her bunk at least 15 times.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/CMSgt Allen on September 28, 2015, 03:48:18 PM
We were running the mile one morning and the guy in front of me decided he was going to puke and continue running while puking. Let's just say my clothes smelled like puke the rest of encampment.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: TheSkyHornet on September 28, 2015, 04:10:12 PM
We were running the mile one morning and the guy in front of me decided he was going to puke and continue running while puking. Let's just say my clothes smelled like puke the rest of encampment.

Ah, yes, running and puking. That feeling you get after like "Ah, finally....power burst!"

Once watched a girl throw up running a two-mile and a dozen other people step in it as they ran. In the end, hey, at least you didn't quit, and, literally, kept chugging along...upchugging at that.  :P

Any chance you know what squadron the person was from?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: SarDragon on September 28, 2015, 04:38:34 PM
We were running the mile one morning and the guy in front of me decided he was going to puke and continue running while puking. Let's just say my clothes smelled like puke the rest of encampment.
The trick here is to use visual clues, and stay out of his "wake" to avoid contamination.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on September 28, 2015, 08:37:16 PM
It's just common courtesy to pull off to the right if you plan on hurling without stopping.
Just sayin'. >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spam on September 29, 2015, 11:35:09 PM
,,, into oncoming traffic?  Why, the blood splash would be bigger than the puke splash!


Cheers,
Spam
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on September 29, 2015, 11:53:34 PM
,,, into oncoming traffic?  Why, the blood splash would be bigger than the puke splash!

Formation runs are conducted on the right side of the road.  So there should be no oncoming traffic to the right of the formation.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on September 30, 2015, 01:14:07 AM
,,, into oncoming traffic?  Why, the blood splash would be bigger than the puke splash!


Cheers,
Spam

Uh, we're talking about the US, not the UK here...
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spam on September 30, 2015, 11:12:09 AM
I always run against traffic, so no, I AM talking about the US, and I hadn't noticed any mention of form runs yet.  However, I hadn't considered that at encampment, many folks would be using a base track, so puking outboard would be a RH turn, after all.

Only we Captalk types would get legalistic about a barf joke, right! (grin)

Cheers,
Spam

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on September 30, 2015, 09:18:35 PM
I always run against traffic, so no, I AM talking about the US, and I hadn't noticed any mention of form runs yet.  However, I hadn't considered that at encampment, many folks would be using a base track, so puking outboard would be a RH turn, after all.

Only we Captalk types would get legalistic about a barf joke, right! (grin)

Cheers,
Spam


A real live track, at an Army Guard Base? Really? Please send pictures! >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spam on October 01, 2015, 12:21:45 PM
(http://media.dma.mil/2015/Sep/22/2001292766/600/400/0/150921-A-YG824-001.JPG)

Your wish is my command, Sahib.  One track, on an Army Guard Base, straight up.

V/R
Spam
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on October 01, 2015, 09:27:26 PM
(http://media.dma.mil/2015/Sep/22/2001292766/600/400/0/150921-A-YG824-001.JPG)

Your wish is my command, Sahib.  One track, on an Army Guard Base, straight up.

V/R
Spam

Okay funny man, now run a lap on that track! >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: abdsp51 on October 01, 2015, 09:32:18 PM
Dealt with a bat infestation during AZ wings encampent last year. 

Got dive bombed a few times by them too. 
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on October 01, 2015, 10:16:23 PM
We have our yearly encounter with the Swallows at Camp San Luis Obispo. They're VERY GOOD at defending their nests.
Especially when they build one on the Dining Facility....
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Luis R. Ramos on October 02, 2015, 09:16:15 AM
Quote
Okay funny man, now run a lap on that track!


Don't ask him that as he may end driving one. And squashing the runners!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PHall on October 02, 2015, 09:22:04 PM
Quote
Okay funny man, now run a lap on that track!


Don't ask him that as he may end driving one. And squashing the runners!

And improve the run times. I have no problems with that! >:D
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spam on October 03, 2015, 07:38:46 PM
Natural selection is an observable proven mechanism which drives changes in populations... so yeah, the average run times and the outlier data would certainly change. (bet y'all didn't expect that out of a Southerner... that natural selection is a testable process?)


I do remember PFT runs at one of my bases (Navy) where the skinny fast sailors were all out front, challenging for the lead, followed by the vast herd of the unwashed masses, followed by the panting sweating fat trays who were on the verge of failing out, followed by a group of aging senior NCOs (Navy Chiefs), easily jogging with their bellies jiggling left and right and packs of cigs in their rolled up T shirt sleeves, occasionally calling out "better run now, boy, or you'll lose liberty!", followed by the corpsman driving the van with the flashers on for drops.  Ah, those were sights to see.  No tanks, though. I think the Marines used them perhaps.


V/R,
Spam
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/CMSgt Allen on October 05, 2015, 12:22:58 PM
We were running the mile one morning and the guy in front of me decided he was going to puke and continue running while puking. Let's just say my clothes smelled like puke the rest of encampment.

Ah, yes, running and puking. That feeling you get after like "Ah, finally....power burst!"

Once watched a girl throw up running a two-mile and a dozen other people step in it as they ran. In the end, hey, at least you didn't quit, and, literally, kept chugging along...upchugging at that.  :P

Any chance you know what squadron the person was from?
Unfortunately no. It was 2 years ago.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: FlyBoy01 on October 05, 2015, 01:13:18 PM
I remember this summer's encampment.  I was the Mess OIC, and a few others from Support Staff were off duty, and relaxing in HQ.  There were snacks.  To name one, swedish fish.  Someone was eating out of the bag, and another staff member wanted one.  She gave one to him, and he put it in his mouth.  IT WAS WET!!! EWW!  He spat it out, rolled on the floor for a bit, then climbed out the window. 

That was a funny day!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: conca27 on February 03, 2016, 05:49:16 PM
So, I was a flight sergeant at the 2014 New York Wing Encampment. The inflights there sleep 10 to a cabin with one cadet staff member and one senior member in the cabin as well. I was the staff member in my cabin and one morning when I woke up, my senior member told me that I had been calling drill commands in my sleep. He also said that my flight was in step during my sleepwalking, so I know it must have been a weird dream. Because only in dreams do cadets stay in step.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Raikkonen on February 09, 2016, 05:52:15 PM
Natural selection is an observable proven mechanism which drives changes in populations... so yeah, the average run times and the outlier data would certainly change. (bet y'all didn't expect that out of a Southerner... that natural selection is a testable process?)


I do remember PFT runs at one of my bases (Navy) where the skinny fast sailors were all out front, challenging for the lead, followed by the vast herd of the unwashed masses, followed by the panting sweating fat trays who were on the verge of failing out, followed by a group of aging senior NCOs (Navy Chiefs), easily jogging with their bellies jiggling left and right and packs of cigs in their rolled up T shirt sleeves, occasionally calling out "better run now, boy, or you'll lose liberty!", followed by the corpsman driving the van with the flashers on for drops.  Ah, those were sights to see.  No tanks, though. I think the Marines used them perhaps.


V/R,
Spam


Ahhhh, that takes me back!!!  4th Brigade, 10th Mountain Division in Fort Polk, LA.  A hot, sweaty mess of 900 people with all of us Seniors yelling at the fat bellies and fall outs for 4 miles.  Good times.  Good times.  Thank you for that brother.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/CMSGTfordayz on March 11, 2016, 11:18:45 PM
2015 NYWg Encampment.  The cadets sleep in "bungalow's" and not in any particular order-the flights are completely split up.  Somehow, probably 7 of the 12 cadets in my bungalow were all from Golf, my flight.  The Flight Sergeant and Flight Commander also happened to be with us in that bungalow.  Anyways, on the 2nd or 3rd night someone said "Goodnight mom" to the Sergeant as he left for a staff gathering.  This continued to the point where we were writing notes for him and leaving them on his pillow.  Finally someone called him "mom" in a formal setting.  Needless to say, there was no more of that.  One of the cadets in our sister flight, Hotel, was a guy I knew from my home squadron.  He was showing a few guys in his flight his boot buffing skills (he was actually really good), and it snowballed.  By the time his flight moved on to a class he must've buffed 50-60 cadets boots because more and more just kept lining up.  On the fourth or fifth day when we went on a C-130 ride, the pilots bet on how many cadets they could get to throw up.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Loya on March 14, 2016, 10:05:30 PM
How about stealing a belt of ammunition off of an Air Force firing range and showing it off at the squadron office when you get home.

Or how about a senior member droping a loaded and ready M9 during a live fire demonstration in front of cadets.

Someone decided to try and steal one bullet, use one fake dummy bullet. And we got the "friendly" treatment from one of the Marines that was there at the shooting range with us. The Marine started to say that he was going to call MP's and have them interrogate every cadet in the squadron. Luckily we found the round and after getting chewed out by command staff, headed back to the barracks. It wasn't even a real bullet, just a fake one in a magazine.  :clap:
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Garibaldi on March 15, 2016, 07:53:03 AM
Ugh....WIWAC, these may have been funny, but I'm sensing some Core Value violations here...theft of anything from a rock to a rocket is pretty serious to the military. They have to account for EVERYTHING, including expended ammo.

Sorry, kids...don't try this at home.  From what I've heard MCLB Albany is being very gracious in allowing us to hold encampment there. Don't do anything to jeopardize it for the future.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: C/Loya on March 19, 2016, 04:01:52 PM
Ugh....WIWAC, these may have been funny, but I'm sensing some Core Value violations here...theft of anything from a rock to a rocket is pretty serious to the military. They have to account for EVERYTHING, including expended ammo.

Sorry, kids...don't try this at home.  From what I've heard MCLB Albany is being very gracious in allowing us to hold encampment there. Don't do anything to jeopardize it for the future.

Agreed, we are very lucky to be there.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spam on March 19, 2016, 11:27:31 PM
From a financial standpoint, certainly.

V/R
Spam

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Lt. Blues on August 24, 2016, 11:26:30 AM
.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on August 24, 2016, 11:57:19 AM
Edited for focus (by me).

Well, I've got a few from this year's NH/VT Encampment.

1. I am from CT wing, but like to staff up in NHVT just because. Naturally, I bring some cadets from my sqdn to go there as basics. Well, I was serving as the SET AOIC. On like the 4rd day, one of the cadets from my squadron comes to me. "Sir, can you find a TAC for me, because I am like 99% sure the girl I stand behind in formation has lice." So, I run off to find a TAC. Ultimately, it was true. A girl had lice, so they locked up the dayroom, took the girl in there to preform lice treatment and smother her hair with mayonnaise. The C/ medical OIC was pissed because she had to deal with it. The TACs and medical then proceeded to do lice checks on every cadet at encampment. It took quite a while.

2. I was about to go to the first male barracks to preform a BDU uniform inspection on the cadets with my SET team. When I get up the stairs and see the cadets at attention, I start crying on the inside because there is a cadet standing there with kiwi polish all over his face. I walk over to him and sigh. I look down and see that his boots looked horrific. I turn to him and say "so, you can polish your mouth but not your boots?" He says sorry and proceeds to tell me that he apparently wiped his mouth while he was polishing his boots. Previously that week, I heard that the same cadet had managed to eat/drink bug spay, so I have no idea what to think anymore

3. I was doing CQ one night. I was patrolling the basic encampment floors with another staff member when a basic started saying something. We leaned to his door. He was sleeping, but he was also saying something like "Sir! Sir! Are you alive? Colonel! Talk to me! are you dead?" My CQ partner in the other barraks was a C/Col, so in the CQ log we proceed to report that 'a Basic finds Col. Rose dead.'

4. On the last morning of encampment, all the cadets were changing into their blues for graduation. I was just about to do the same when the same cadet that eat the polish came up to me and said he felt like he had to throw up. I tell him to go to the staff bathroom and throw up there, because it was the closest to where we were. Well, knowing that cadet, I probably should have told him to go in the toilet, because he proceeded to vomit over the drain in the middle of the floor. We took him out and sent him to medical. The bathroom stunk, and we had no legitimate way to clean it up. Well, medical had this disgusting can of orange powdered Gatorade. We had to clean this up fast before graduation so I took the can from medical (with permission of course) and poured it over the vomit. It looked disgusting, but made the room smell quite a bit better. We then swept it up and threw it unto the garbage bin outside. But that's not the end of it. The Chief TAC and I went on to sanitize the broom and dustpan, as well as mop the floor in the bathroom. Well, when Chief TAC was rolling the mop bucket out of the bathroom, it tipped over, and the disgusting water went all over the floor of the staff hallway. We then cleaned all of that up, and proceeded to get ready for graduation. Needless to say, I am never going to be drinking orange Gatorade again any time soon.

It was a jolly good time.

"CQ, firewatch, etc." is and has been prohibited from cadets for at least 2 years. 

CAPP 52-14, Page 7:
"b. Cadet Charge of Quarters or Firewatch. Cadet CQ programs are ineffective as safety precautions, do
not impart meaningful learning, are potentially hazardous, and are therefore prohibited. Cadets will not serve as
sentries or safety monitors during the overnight hours. A senior member must bunk in close proximity to the
cadets (at least one senior per floor or wing is suggested) and be available to respond to any emergencies that
arise between lights-out and reveille. "


Cadets should never have any confusion about who their training officers are, nor where to find them:
Capp 52-24, Page 14:
"The encampment must provide at least one full-time training officer per flight. The ideal maximum cadet to
training officer ratio is 18:1. When large flights are used (ie: flights of more than 18 cadets), it is recommended
that a squadron-level senior training officer or an assistant training officer be available to keep the adult to cadet
ratio manageable. Further, encampments should have senior members of both genders on staff. Typically, female
cadets are the minority, and while in no way limiting their full and active participation, the encampment should
endeavor to have 1 female senior member (who can serve in any staff role) available for every 18 female cadets."


Lastly, I do not understand how we still have "Cadet Medical Anything" in a CAP parlance, especially encampments.

Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Spaceman3750 on August 24, 2016, 01:01:59 PM
... and smother her hair with mayonnaise. The C/ medical OIC was pissed because she had to deal with it.

What?

I'm glad I don't have kids, because I would have been super upset if this were my kid... Or a cadet I was responsible for, now that I think about it.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: LSThiker on August 24, 2016, 01:43:17 PM
Ultimately, it was true. A girl had lice, so they locked up the dayroom, took the girl in there to preform lice treatment and smother her hair with mayonnaise. The C/ medical OIC was pissed because she had to deal with it. The TACs and medical then proceeded to do lice checks on every cadet at encampment. It took quite a while.

First a cadet medical OIC?  Yeah he/she should not be taking care of that.  I hope parents were contacted before any treatments.

There are no studies that support mayonnaise as a head lice treatment works.  At best, it may get rid of lice that are holding on the hair, but it does not get rid of the nits, which are cemented to the hair shaft.  I know there are many parents that claim it works, but those claims have not been verified and as such should not be used.  At best, the parents should have been contacted. 

Quote
Occlusive Agents

Occlusive agents, such as “petrolatum shampoo,” mayonnaise, butter or margarine, herbal oils, and olive oil, applied to suffocate the lice are widely used but have not been evaluated for effectiveness in randomized controlled trials. To date, only anecdotal information is available concerning effectiveness.

Devore CD, Schutze GE; AAP, Council on School Health, Committee on Infectious Dises. Head Lice. Pediatrics. 2015;135(5):e1355–e1365 - October 01, 2015

Quote from: CDC
Is mayonnaise effective for treating head lice?

CDC does not have clear scientific evidence to determine if suffocation of head lice with mayonnaise, olive oil, margarine, butter, or similar substances is an effective form of treatment.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on August 24, 2016, 02:17:52 PM
Legit issues raised, I pulled to discuss with mods...


Safe to say I'll just keep my thoughts to myself then?
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Eclipse on August 24, 2016, 08:53:36 PM
Legit issues raised, I pulled to discuss with mods...


Safe to say I'll just keep my thoughts to myself then?

Do not let my neurosis affect yours.  See above.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: Fubar on August 25, 2016, 01:40:19 AM
Col Lee has mentioned on more than one occasion how much he likes to visit as many encampments as possible. Perhaps he should add NH/VT to the list.
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: PA Guy on August 25, 2016, 02:23:33 AM
Lt Blue,

You may have had a "jolly good time" but you didn't go to an encampment you attended a giant cluster. The mayo incident just beggars belief!!!!!
Title: Re: Encampment stories
Post by: THRAWN on August 25, 2016, 01:01:19 PM
Col Lee has mentioned on more than one occasion how much he likes to visit as many encampments as possible. Perhaps he should add NH/VT to the list.

Add it to the list or make it a summer home. Gadzooks.