CAP Talk

Operations => Emergency Services & Operations => Topic started by: GroundHawg on August 07, 2020, 04:21:28 pm

Title: GROL
Post by: GroundHawg on August 07, 2020, 04:21:28 pm
We don't have a commo section so I am posting this here. My employer has updated their requirements and I now have to upgrade to a GROL and get a TWIC card.

Does anyone in here have their GROL? What is the process like? How hard are the exams? How long does it take the FCC to cut your license? As far as CAP goes, is it necessary or just an extra piece of paper?
Title: Re: GROL
Post by: Holding Pattern on August 07, 2020, 05:20:48 pm
Quote from: GroundHawg on August 07, 2020, 04:21:28 pmWe don't have a commo section so I am posting this here. My employer has updated their requirements and I now have to upgrade to a GROL and get a TWIC card.

Does anyone in here have their GROL? What is the process like? How hard are the exams? How long does it take the FCC to cut your license? As far as CAP goes, is it necessary or just an extra piece of paper?

I've wondered about the GROL for years. It has references in regulation and on the CAPF45, but I've never heard anyone ask for or mention using it as part of their work in CAP.

I'd get it if it was an asset to CAP, otherwise I have no reason to.
Title: Re: GROL
Post by: NovemberWhiskey on August 08, 2020, 12:51:51 am
I have a GROL. At the squadron level, it has never meant anything at all. Per CAPR 100-1, I'm qualified to do maintenance, testing and measurements on CAP equipment.

I reserved over the phone and took it at a local CATS/Comira test location with a whole bunch of people taking other exams (mostly to join the TSA as far as I could tell on that particular day). It's a typical multiple-choice test, 90 minutes allocated time where if you know your stuff it'll take you about 15. There was some kind of process where you had to mail in the test pass certificate and the FCC application paperwork to the CATS/Comira central office and then they uploaded it to the FCC on your behalf. It took about two or three weeks before my license showed in ULS.

As someone with a pre-existing math, electronics and radio background (General-class amateur), my preparation was spending about two days reading a self-study book and I passed with 100%.
Title: Re: GROL
Post by: SarDragon on August 08, 2020, 08:49:19 pm
I have asked that very question of my Comm folks here, and most have not seen a real need or benefit. The only radios we work on locally are the repeaters, and we have a pretty decent group of techs to work on them, some being in the Comm business for a living.

I have explored the exam, and much of it deals with shipboard equipment. There is a fee to take it, but I do not know the current cost. As for FCC response, in my limited dealings, they have been prompt. My Ham license took about two weeks to process, maybe less.
Title: Re: GROL
Post by: etodd on August 09, 2020, 12:28:04 am
A lifetime ago, back in 1974 while working in TV, I got the precursor of GROL, my First Class Radiotelephone Operator License. I even had the Ship Radar Endorsement for fun. In 1984 they changed it to GROL, and offered a lifetime GROL to existing First Class holders. Just had to mail in a form to get the new one. At that point I was working more in the production side of broadcasting instead of the engineering side, so didn't bother mailing in the form. Regretted it ever since. Short sightedness of youth.
Title: Re: GROL
Post by: MSG Mac on August 09, 2020, 02:17:03 am
I was speaking to my brother last week. He told me that after taking an on-line class he was able to test and pass the General license.
Title: Re: GROL
Post by: GroundHawg on August 10, 2020, 02:58:20 pm
I will let you guys know how it is when I take it here soon. I think its overkill for what my company needs but if they are going to pay for it, why not.
Title: Re: GROL
Post by: NovemberWhiskey on August 10, 2020, 03:08:37 pm
Honestly, if you understand the concept of complex impedance contributed by a real resistance part and an imaginary reactance part, and you know how to convert between polar and cartesian forms, then most of what's left over is either common sense or rote learning of various regulatory concepts.