CAP Talk

Operations => Emergency Services & Operations => Topic started by: Holding Pattern on January 16, 2020, 05:39:26 pm

Title: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: Holding Pattern on January 16, 2020, 05:39:26 pm
In my CERT thread, one comment was made about CAP's long spin-up time for response.

Anyone here have thoughts on how to decrease that spin-up time?

Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: jeders on January 16, 2020, 05:48:42 pm
The biggest problem CAP has, at every level, is we wait until the disaster is headed for us to start building relationships; which just gets us left out in the cold. Squadrons need to reach out to their city/county/regional EMAs and develop those relationships beyond the, "here's my card, call me in an emergency" stage. Once those local relationships start getting built, wing needs to carry the ball the rest of the way to get MOUs in place as needed, or at the very least to not stand in the way every time something new or different comes down the line.
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: NIN on January 16, 2020, 06:41:33 pm
More importantly, CAP needs to exercise those relationships on a regular basis, and definitely pick up the phone when the MOU'd agencies call.

Its not enough to even have a relationship:  your partner agencies need to know that if they call 1-XXX-YYY-1234  that someone is going to answer the phone and make the wheels turn that spits out whatever the MOU says its supposed to spit out: aerial photography, airborne repeaters, ground teams, whatever.

Its not the MOU'd agency's fault that 1-XXX-YYY-1234 isn't the wing's alerting phone number anymore. Or that the process changed. Or that the wing's POC is Captain Schmuckatelli instead of Major Bagodonuts. They want to activate a resource that can support them.

So it incumbent on us to exercise all of that, from "State EOC calls" to "units alert their resources" to "Cadet Smith signs in at the mission base" to "We need to apply for the appropriate reimbursement for this exercise against the state/FEMA/whomever."

So that the first time they call when the balloon goes up, its not the first time we've ever been called.

Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: Майор Хаткевич on January 16, 2020, 07:26:56 pm
I see the signature has been updated, your Royal Eagleness!

Congrats Col. Nin!
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: etodd on January 16, 2020, 07:41:04 pm
Quote....  long spin-up time for response ....


Seems to me the answers above are only semi related to "spin-up time for response".

My first thoughts are what type of call is it?

We seem to be fairly quick at getting in the air for the most part.  AFRCC calls a Wing DO, and the DO then sends out a text message or favorite method to to all the Squadrons to see who can get a team assembled. First one thats says 'headed to the airport" usually gets the mission. Spin-up time is related to who is at work, has to try and get off, run home to get into uniform, and then head to the airport and pre-flight the plane, get a release, etc., etc. Anyone sitting at home ready to jump, has a heads up on the others.     FIRST RESPONDERS do not usually have all those issues. They are already at work, in their uniform, and maybe even in their vehicle or aircraft, with all gear with them.

Ground teams.   We had an ELT mission a month or so ago. We had a plane circling the spot, found by the Becker, for over 30 minutes before all the parents of the Cadets could get them to a meeting point.

Tornado or Hurricane?  We are usually ready to go, long before we get tasked. Its usually a day or two after the disaster, so we all have been forewarned and are ready.

Maybe I'm missing the OP's point of  "long spin-up time for response"?

Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: PHall on January 16, 2020, 07:43:51 pm
Have the State EOC call the National Operations Center (NOC) which IS manned 24/7.
They can call the Wing in question. Because they do have the current numbers.
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: LSThiker on January 16, 2020, 07:49:25 pm
Quote from: PHall on January 16, 2020, 07:43:51 pm
Have the State EOC call the National Operations Center (NOC) which IS manned 24/7.
They can call the Wing in question. Because they do have the current numbers.


Had a phone call to the NOC on a weekend once. It took 3 hrs for the NOC to return the call. 

The emergency was resolved by then.

Manned 24/7 is nice to say, but response time is poor. 

Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: TheSkyHornet on January 16, 2020, 07:54:00 pm
To etodd's point, we have a similar response process when it comes to airline accidents where we have an expected time to respond.

If we're in the office, we can walk into our Emergency Operations Center within a matter of minutes. Take in the initial information, and start preparing to deploy if appropriate. We want to be ready to roll out within 3 hours to head to the accident.

If we're not in the office, say, 10pm on Thursday evening, good luck. It'll be hours, if not tomorrow, but the time people find out and make it into the EOC.

It's one thing to be on Ready Alert status at a launch base, let alone on Ready Alert from your living room (or place of recreation). It's another to respond to a call that you're not waiting for and not expecting. Sure, a Go Bag is great when you're in the kitchen making breakfast, but try being out to dinner on Friday evening and your phone is in your back pocket, and you don't hear it go off.
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: TheSkyHornet on January 16, 2020, 08:04:46 pm
Just want to separate my talking points in my comments--

We had a case where our Ground "Team" was called up. We only have one member in the squadron who is current in their GT operational status. My understanding, based on how it was explained to me, is that when the call came in, it went to our Commander and Emergency Services Officer. Our Commander figured the ESO was handling it. The ESO didn't pass on any more details because there was nobody available per the "Call Me" roster.

Our GT guy said "Nobody called me. I was available."

#Covfefe
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: etodd on January 16, 2020, 08:13:37 pm
Quote from: TheSkyHornet on January 16, 2020, 08:04:46 pm


...  nobody available per the "Call Me" roster.



My Squadron doesn't  use a "call me roster".  We send out texts or calls to everyone who has the qualification needed. They can always say no, or ignore. 
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: TheSkyHornet on January 16, 2020, 08:16:51 pm
Quote from: etodd on January 16, 2020, 08:13:37 pm
Quote from: TheSkyHornet on January 16, 2020, 08:04:46 pm


...  nobody available per the "Call Me" roster.



My Squadron doesn't  use a "call me roster".  We send out texts or calls to everyone who has the qualification needed. They can always say no, or ignore.



That was the catch-all/blockade:
Nobody knows what the protocol is.

The question that was brought up was "Why is this going through a mediator rather than a direct notification system to the individual?"

Makes me happy to work in Cadet Programs  :D
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: Spam on January 16, 2020, 08:22:54 pm
Quote from: TheSkyHornet on January 16, 2020, 08:04:46 pm
Just want to separate my talking points in my comments--

We had a case where our Ground "Team" was called up. We only have one member in the squadron who is current in their GT operational status.



So, Hornet, being impersonally blunt but honest:

= your unit does not in fact have a Ground Team.
= based on web provided information, your Wing alerting system should not have pinged your unit.


The competency of your Wing level alerting officer wasn't up to the task of verifying currency before tasking, and
The competency of your local unit wasn't sufficient to coordinate (let alone train/maintain currency for a team) on a local level.


This sadly is how it goes more often than not with many volunteer organizations, unless we are impersonally blunt and honest with our self examinations and corrective actions. This really is a case example for why the spin up time for DR (and any other missions) can be unsat: lack of a coherent process to verify currency, coupled with lack of adherence to an exercised notification plan. Either are leading indicators of a systematically broken ops community.


V/r
Spam


Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: Spam on January 16, 2020, 08:53:53 pm
Separate issue: DR staging awareness, coordination, and cooperative planning.


As part of a cooperative SER/MER team which plans to respond to hurricane DR missions, a series of Area Command conference calls are typically initiated upon the elevation of an alert status (typically strike minus x days). Task flows typically include (from a Georgia Wing example plan):

1. Coordination calls. A Wing stakeholder call to ensure we were on the same page before routing in the area command, etc.  This included CC, CVs, DC, LG, DES, DOS, and the IC for round one.  Goals included ICP options, status of assets, general plans of action, and expectation setting.  An item to make very clear is the division of duties between the wing staff and the mission base staff - we set up resources and OPTIONS for the ICs to use, paving roads, and the wing staff will then take a back seat to the mission base when the ICP is set up, unless signed in to the mission, and will be available to pull resources for the IC as needed.  Second item of clarity is resourcing proper qualified staff and assets, with delegations, including full staffing of mission base and plans to pass the torch after operational periods (this includes planning for qualified PSCs, etc.).

2. Identification of logistics.  Using past effectiveness data, we try to ID possible ICPs and/or staging areas pending actual landfall.  For an example hurricane strike on coastal GA, Plan 1 is to set up an ICP at Augusta (Daniel Field) - likely strike -2d.  We have a squadron there that can provide host facilities, large ramp space for aircraft, and space for the MCV.  The squadron commander contacts the airport and airport is happy to have us.  Again, pending landfall, Macon and Statesboro are options for staging areas.  The goal is to keep us 'out of the muck' where we can provide adequate ICP facilities, fly crews in to stage/deliver SD cards, keep us out of the flow of traffic, hotels, etc. and the local team was on board.  Augusta also provides a good base to launch to assist SC if needed.  Alternatively, the team works plans 2 and 3 for a Macon and Statesboro bed down and support plan, keeping in mind the logistics of working in an area with massively displaced population (full hotels etc).

3. IC and Agency Liaison get most of the key mission base staff requested and they're standing by *with plans for follow on shifts.  They reach out to a contact at GEMA (Georgia state EMA) to do a soft inquiry regarding assistance request

4. Wing staff LG report back on staging. Wing staff stakeholders provide up to date lists of vehicle status/location, aircraft status/location, camera kit status/location to IC shorten leg work for section chiefs and branches.  They closely track aircraft maintenance status (i.e. coming up on summer hurricane season, staff may plan/schedule PM: fresh annuals to prevent aircraft going down when needed).  The Wing staff execute either a bed down or HURREVAC (Hurricane Evacuation) plan - aircraft based on the coast/islands are hangared or flown inland.  Vehicles on the coast are driven inland before the state issues mandatory evac orders (strike - 3 days or so).

5. Set up Area Command and C3I links, and initiate coordination on tasking requests. Create a joint mailbox has been created at (for example),  hurricanenamegawg.cap.gov.   Add members of the area command.  Set up a phone line via the Wing digital phone system (with mailboxes) and place it in the ICP as well. Plan the Area Command call, inviting key SER CC team, MER stakeholders, and whomever the IC wishes to include as well.  The team keeps this as a standing call as required per OP, as the ICP stands up and executes taskings.

//example ends


So, from my perspective as a recent Wing/CV, there are a multitude of factors and tasks which impact spin up time for a full DR mission response. I thought I'd share some of these examples, to help frame some of the discussion. Having a CONOPS, updating it, and exercising it is paramount. A wing level CONOPS Playbook should provide a set of Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures (TTPs) via action plans, checklists, and resource lists. These plans should be:
(1) Negotiated - with our federal, state, and local customers
(2) Exercised - as the basis for numbered SAR/DR Exercises (SAREX/DREXs).
(3) Updated - based on changes in agreements and as a result of exercises.

Every good team needs a playbook so that all the players start the game with a common vision. Playbooks are in standard use in the military and emergency communities. State and local preplans and supporting data are recommended in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National SAR plan, and are also recommended through the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) SAR School. A DR Playbook sets forth common preplans guiding the conduct of prompt and sustained Disaster Relief (DR) and Search and Rescue (SAR) operations, and provides job aids and resources to execute those plans. See CAPR 60-3 26 DECEMBER 2012, Section 1-5(b)2 requirements for Wings to write and execute preplans based on local history.

That's my best recommendation on how to decrease spin up time and proper customer focused response (as opposed to a FLAILEX).


V/r
Spam

Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: NIN on January 16, 2020, 09:20:18 pm
The other aspect to "long spin up time" is strictly economic:  We're not going to do a lot of prepositioning, etc, of resources that's going to incur costs until you're sure you're going to employ those resources.

You spend a bunch of money to pre-position airplanes and crews, for example, and the impending hurricane peters out in the Gulf, that money has to get paid from someplace.

So CAP often doesn't turn a blade or a tire until there's an actual situation that we're going to be involved with.
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: NIN on January 16, 2020, 09:21:58 pm
Quote from: Spam on January 16, 2020, 08:53:53 pm
(as opposed to a FLAILEX).


Yeah, stealing that one.
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: Holding Pattern on January 16, 2020, 09:50:29 pm
Quote from: Spam on January 16, 2020, 08:53:53 pm
Separate issue: DR staging awareness, coordination, and cooperative planning.


As part of a cooperative SER/MER team which plans to respond to hurricane DR missions, a series of Area Command conference calls are typically initiated upon the elevation of an alert status (typically strike minus x days). Task flows typically include (from a Georgia Wing example plan):

1. Coordination calls. A Wing stakeholder call to ensure we were on the same page before routing in the area command, etc.  This included CC, CVs, DC, LG, DES, DOS, and the IC for round one.  Goals included ICP options, status of assets, general plans of action, and expectation setting.  An item to make very clear is the division of duties between the wing staff and the mission base staff - we set up resources and OPTIONS for the ICs to use, paving roads, and the wing staff will then take a back seat to the mission base when the ICP is set up, unless signed in to the mission, and will be available to pull resources for the IC as needed.  Second item of clarity is resourcing proper qualified staff and assets, with delegations, including full staffing of mission base and plans to pass the torch after operational periods (this includes planning for qualified PSCs, etc.).

2. Identification of logistics.  Using past effectiveness data, we try to ID possible ICPs and/or staging areas pending actual landfall.  For an example hurricane strike on coastal GA, Plan 1 is to set up an ICP at Augusta (Daniel Field) - likely strike -2d.  We have a squadron there that can provide host facilities, large ramp space for aircraft, and space for the MCV.  The squadron commander contacts the airport and airport is happy to have us.  Again, pending landfall, Macon and Statesboro are options for staging areas.  The goal is to keep us 'out of the muck' where we can provide adequate ICP facilities, fly crews in to stage/deliver SD cards, keep us out of the flow of traffic, hotels, etc. and the local team was on board.  Augusta also provides a good base to launch to assist SC if needed.  Alternatively, the team works plans 2 and 3 for a Macon and Statesboro bed down and support plan, keeping in mind the logistics of working in an area with massively displaced population (full hotels etc).

3. IC and Agency Liaison get most of the key mission base staff requested and they're standing by *with plans for follow on shifts.  They reach out to a contact at GEMA (Georgia state EMA) to do a soft inquiry regarding assistance request

4. Wing staff LG report back on staging. Wing staff stakeholders provide up to date lists of vehicle status/location, aircraft status/location, camera kit status/location to IC shorten leg work for section chiefs and branches.  They closely track aircraft maintenance status (i.e. coming up on summer hurricane season, staff may plan/schedule PM: fresh annuals to prevent aircraft going down when needed).  The Wing staff execute either a bed down or HURREVAC (Hurricane Evacuation) plan - aircraft based on the coast/islands are hangared or flown inland.  Vehicles on the coast are driven inland before the state issues mandatory evac orders (strike - 3 days or so).

5. Set up Area Command and C3I links, and initiate coordination on tasking requests. Create a joint mailbox has been created at (for example),  hurricanenamegawg.cap.gov.   Add members of the area command.  Set up a phone line via the Wing digital phone system (with mailboxes) and place it in the ICP as well. Plan the Area Command call, inviting key SER CC team, MER stakeholders, and whomever the IC wishes to include as well.  The team keeps this as a standing call as required per OP, as the ICP stands up and executes taskings.

//example ends


So, from my perspective as a recent Wing/CV, there are a multitude of factors and tasks which impact spin up time for a full DR mission response. I thought I'd share some of these examples, to help frame some of the discussion. Having a CONOPS, updating it, and exercising it is paramount. A wing level CONOPS Playbook should provide a set of Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures (TTPs) via action plans, checklists, and resource lists. These plans should be:
(1) Negotiated - with our federal, state, and local customers
(2) Exercised - as the basis for numbered SAR/DR Exercises (SAREX/DREXs).
(3) Updated - based on changes in agreements and as a result of exercises.

Every good team needs a playbook so that all the players start the game with a common vision. Playbooks are in standard use in the military and emergency communities. State and local preplans and supporting data are recommended in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National SAR plan, and are also recommended through the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) SAR School. A DR Playbook sets forth common preplans guiding the conduct of prompt and sustained Disaster Relief (DR) and Search and Rescue (SAR) operations, and provides job aids and resources to execute those plans. See CAPR 60-3 26 DECEMBER 2012, Section 1-5(b)2 requirements for Wings to write and execute preplans based on local history.

That's my best recommendation on how to decrease spin up time and proper customer focused response (as opposed to a FLAILEX).


V/r
Spam


I'm going to file the serial numbers off this and use it as a template for a wing presentation.
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: Spam on January 16, 2020, 10:52:08 pm

Feel free, Sir. SER/CC should get credit.

FLAILEX - also public domain. Have at it (LOL)

On the barrier of economic cost: we faced some lessons learned four years ago when we ended up with aircrew on a bare airstrip in the country, with no support, no meals and no water. Based on that we pushed for a CONOPS (ok - I was a bit of a pest about it, lol) wherein we budgeted and planned for fall and winter local (Group) SAREXs to practice skills as individuals and teams (singing lessons) building up to planned springtime DREXs (DR Exercises) cooperatively with state agencies before hurricane season started (choir practice). It was very tough to sell to northern units why they needed to practice deploying rather than spending cash locally for more tactical flying in their back yard, but once we got a couple of crews to participate it built up intertia and made sense. You can't just tell people drop it and deploy for a week, without having had some practice in actually deploying. Don't assume. Talk to your customers, practice, document, fix, repeat.

I say having received aircrews from 32 Wings on a flooding mission (1993), having deployed on carriers myself, and now that as we've got people on the deployment list to head to PR WG now, the same planning and practice process works.


"We did not anticipate that airliners would be commandeered and turned into guided mssiles; but the fact that we practiced for other kinds of disasters made us far more prepared to handle a catastrophe that nobody envisioned."
--Rudolph W. Giuliani, former mayor of New York City


V/r
Spam


Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: xyzzy on January 17, 2020, 11:47:51 am
I notice a different point of view between how CAP writes about starting up a mission vs. how first response agencies write about starting a response.

For CAP, an early step in the process is contacting the wing commander. So what if the wing commander doesn't answer the phone? Perhaps various wings have contingency plans for that, but national policies don't spell out what happens. Wing websites don't spell it out so all the members know who who to call when the wing commander can't be reached.

A somewhat later step is to appoint an incident commander, who must have an incident commander qualification.

For first response organizations the alert usually goes out to everyone concerned; if the assigned person doesn't notify the dispatcher that he/she is handling the incident, someone else steps up or is assigned. For those organizations that rely on phones, there is a call down list. The first eligible person who is reached is in charge of organizing the response until relived by a superior.

Similarly for incident command, the first eligible person, from any first responder agency, is the incident commander until relived by either a superior, or a person from a more appropriate agency. For example, an ambulance is driving down the street and sees a house on fire, so the crew chief is the incident commander until the fire department arrives.

So the basic CAP approach is dot the i's and cross the t's first; if and when that's accomplished, respond. The first response agencies mount some kind of a response with whatever resources can be found, even if that response amounts to "isolate and deny entry".
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: NovemberWhiskey on January 17, 2020, 02:34:49 pm
Quote from: xyzzy on January 17, 2020, 11:47:51 am
So what if the wing commander doesn't answer the phone? Perhaps various wings have contingency plans for that, but national policies don't spell out what happens.


CAPR 60-3 does contain some guidance on this at least for C911 missions. The authority is the wing commander or their designee; but in the absence of the wing commander, the vice commander, the director of operations or the director of emergency services can authorize the mission. (CAPR 60-3 1-19(a))
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: CAP9907 on January 17, 2020, 07:12:02 pm
Quote from: xyzzy on January 17, 2020, 11:47:51 am
I notice a different point of view between how CAP writes about starting up a mission vs. how first response agencies write about starting a response.

For CAP, an early step in the process is contacting the wing commander. So what if the wing commander doesn't answer the phone? Perhaps various wings have contingency plans for that, but national policies don't spell out what happens. Wing websites don't spell it out so all the members know who who to call when the wing commander can't be reached.

A somewhat later step is to appoint an incident commander, who must have an incident commander qualification.




This is not the case, at least as far as the regulations are concerned. Your Wing may do it that way, but the Wing Commander need not be the first call, or any call at all to start an AFAM. I'd refer you to 60-3 and the C-1 tab of the CI process (on the NHQ IG page). I'm not a CC or deputy at any level, but I am a WAO and IC. When I get the call from AFRCC, I am able to commit the Wings resources and accept the mission on behalf of the CC without involving him. WMIRS 1.0 has every Wings alert roster, and that's what they use to alert. Go check your Wings roster, I'd bet your CC is not on that alert list, as most are not.

Of course I'd give him a courtesy call to keep him advised about the event, but the missions do not stop because the CC is in the john , at work, or on a safari.

~9907

Edit: and what NW said also
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: NIN on January 17, 2020, 08:38:21 pm
Quote from: CAP9907 on January 17, 2020, 07:12:02 pm
This is not the case, at least as far as the regulations are concerned. Your Wing may do it that way, but the Wing Commander need not be the first call, or any call at all to start an AFAM. I'd refer you to 60-3 and the C-1 tab of the CI process (on the NHQ IG page). I'm not a CC or deputy at any level, but I am a WAO and IC. When I get the call from AFRCC, I am able to commit the Wings resources and accept the mission on behalf of the CC without involving him. WMIRS 1.0 has every Wings alert roster, and that's what they use to alert. Go check your Wings roster, I'd bet your CC is not on that alert list, as most are not.

Of course I'd give him a courtesy call to keep him advised about the event, but the missions do not stop because the CC is in the john , at work, or on a safari.


As a new Wing Commander, this would be my preference as well.  Fire alarms don't require the fire chief or a battalion chief to authorize the run. The dispatch tones out the resources and away they go, Dalmations in trail.

Same here: If my wing is alerted at 0300 for an air SAR coverage mission and its within our capabilities and all the criteria are met (ie. IC, FRO, etc) to execute the mission, it does not require my imprimatur to execute.  And it especially doesn't need it if waiting for me to green light is going to delay our normal response.

I'm either way late on the list or really at the very end after the machinery is spun up and moving.

Now, if the folks need a special release, a sign off due to a high ORM score before they can launch, etc, thats a different matter.
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: JayT on January 18, 2020, 02:33:36 am
Quote from: Holding Pattern on January 16, 2020, 05:39:26 pm
In my CERT thread, one comment was made about CAP's long spin-up time for response.

Anyone here have thoughts on how to decrease that spin-up time?


Depends on the type of incident as well.
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: sardak on January 18, 2020, 02:36:24 am
Our wing has a single 800 alert number provided to AFCCC, the 64 sheriffs and state OEM (county OEMs normally work through state OEM). Our WMIRS alert roster, like the one CAP9907 mentions, has only the contact info for ICs who also serve as duty alert officers.  The wing CC is not on the list unless he/she is a duty alert IC, and I don't recall that being the case in 22 years.  We provide a printed copy of the alert roster to OEM and the sheriffs. On the reverse side from the alert officers is a list of our capabilities and the contact info for the wing CC and CV as command, not as alert staff.

We rotate the on-call alert officer duty among the list. The members who are notified when someone calls the 800 number usually includes the wing commander, but it's their choice whether or not to be notified.  This notification can go to a text message, a pager and/or an email. The on-call has 10 minutes to acknowledge receipt of the alert back to the group. If that doesn't happen, the DOS or WAO jumps in. There have been a few times on delayed acknowledgements when a wing commander has replied back to the group asking if anyone has answered the alert.

The alert officer who replies to the alert can take the mission as IC or offer it to other ICs, those on or off the alert roster. Taking the mission as IC does not require wing commander notification or approval.

I'm also an alert coordinator for our volunteer county SAR team. We're notified by text from sheriff's dispatch, which goes to any text capable device and email. The procedure works pretty much like above, except for no wing commander in or on the perimeter of the system (the team president is an alert coordinator). We can also respond back to dispatch by radio.

Mike
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: etodd on January 18, 2020, 03:23:28 am
Quote from: xyzzy on January 17, 2020, 11:47:51 am

For example, an ambulance is driving down the street and sees a house on fire, so the crew chief is the incident commander until the fire department arrives.



Yep.  Its constantly drilled into us to never "self deploy".  Sit back and wait.
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: THRAWN on January 18, 2020, 01:08:09 pm
When I was wing DOS, I used a rotating task force structure I stole from the Marines. Ground and air, each group would be the initial response unit for the week with their supporting MMS. I have it laying around somewhere. If I find it, Ill post the details.
Title: Re: How to decrease CAP's spin-up time for disaster response
Post by: arajca on January 18, 2020, 04:23:21 pm
Quote from: etodd on January 18, 2020, 03:23:28 am
Quote from: xyzzy on January 17, 2020, 11:47:51 am

For example, an ambulance is driving down the street and sees a house on fire, so the crew chief is the incident commander until the fire department arrives.



Yep.  Its constantly drilled into us to never "self deploy".  Sit back and wait.

There's a difference between stumbling across an incident and self-deploying to an incident.