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DocJekyll
Member

Posts: 81

« on: March 14, 2017, 09:15:55 PM »

Hello all,

I'm looking for regulations, pamphlets, or other CAP guidance on handling Integrity Violations with regards to Testing. I'm trying to better understand how one would go about both investigation and repercussion actions if a cadet were to violate the honor code while taking a test for promotions.

Could any of you help steer me in the right direction? Thanks!
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MSG Mac
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Unit: MER-MD-071

« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2017, 09:22:42 PM »

CAPR 50-4 Testing Administration and Security
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Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
DocJekyll
Member

Posts: 81

« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2017, 09:46:31 PM »

CAPR 50-4 Testing Administration and Security

I've looked through the 50-4 but it seems to speak more to test material compromises and not so much about what would need to happen, or what the potential repercussions of a cadet violating the honor code while taking a test in the online format. Is there something more specific to the situation I'm referring to?
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etodd
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Posts: 562

« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2017, 10:32:09 PM »


...while taking a test in the online format.

Are not all CAP online tests "open book"?  What kind of violation could one have in taking an online test?  Isn't it about learning the material? If you come across a question you don't remember, look it up, now you know the material. Everyone should always make 100%.
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arajca
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Posts: 4,094

« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2017, 10:34:57 PM »


...while taking a test in the online format.

Are not all CAP online tests "open book"?  What kind of violation could one have in taking an online test?  Isn't it about learning the material? If you come across a question you don't remember, look it up, now you know the material. Everyone should always make 100%.
Having a parent or another cadet take the test.

What is this "honor code" you refer to?
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DocJekyll
Member

Posts: 81

« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2017, 10:47:31 PM »


...while taking a test in the online format.

Are not all CAP online tests "open book"?  What kind of violation could one have in taking an online test?  Isn't it about learning the material? If you come across a question you don't remember, look it up, now you know the material. Everyone should always make 100%.
Having a parent or another cadet take the test.

What is this "honor code" you refer to?

An honor statement will buttress the integrity of the testing program in an open-book environment. Before beginning an online test, cadets must agree to the following:

Quote
I certify that I am Cadet (Name). I will complete the following Cadet Aerospace Test on my own, without help from another person. My only resource for this open-book test will be my cadet textbooks and class notes. [By clicking below,] I reaffirm my commitment to our Core Value of Integrity.

If someone willingly violates that by perhaps having a cadet, parent, or someone who isn't even affiliated with CAP study for and take the test, there is some justification for saying it's an honor code / core value violation. I can't remember the exact CAP phraseology but I sure remember it from the AF. Integrity First, Service before self, Excellence in all we do.

I'm fairly certain I know how it would be handled if an alleged violation like this occurred, but I'd like to find some kind of documentation I can use to cite with regards to how it should be handled.
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DocJekyll
Member

Posts: 81

« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2017, 10:52:14 PM »


...while taking a test in the online format.

Are not all CAP online tests "open book"?  What kind of violation could one have in taking an online test?  Isn't it about learning the material? If you come across a question you don't remember, look it up, now you know the material. Everyone should always make 100%.

You'd think so...
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DJ Light Chop
Member

Posts: 71

« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2017, 11:23:15 PM »

I suppose the commander could require the cadets to do the online testing during a squadron meeting.  That way they can ensure the tests are done properly.  Not certain that is something a commander is allowed to require, however.
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Eclipse
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« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2017, 11:30:25 PM »


...while taking a test in the online format.

Are not all CAP online tests "open book"?  What kind of violation could one have in taking an online test?  Isn't it about learning the material? If you come across a question you don't remember, look it up, now you know the material. Everyone should always make 100%.

Milestone tests are closed book. Wright Brothers, Mitchell, Earhart, Eaker, & Spaatz.

First, reveiw the UCC session on Adverse Member Actions:
http://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/UCCSGAdverse_Membership_Actions_3CD0EBFBFCC74.pdf
This document includes the relevent regulations as well as advice on best practices, including LOAs & Rs

My suggestion would be to start with a Form 50 session that includes the parents. Make sure that
you use the proper form per phase.

F50-1 Phase I
F50-2 Phase II
F50-3 Phase III
F50-4 Phase IV

CAPR 35-1 deals with suspensions

CAPR 35-1, Page 3
http://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/R035_001_88C55F858019C.pdf

"(2) Regulatory Infractions or Misconduct. A unit or higher commander may suspend a
member for up to 60 days for misconduct or regulatory infractions. Suspensions in excess of 60 days
require approval of the wing commander (or commander at the next higher echelon if the suspension is
initiated at wing or region level). Suspensions under the provisions of this paragraph will not exceed a
total of 180 days."


CAPR 52-16 Page 25-26 deals with demotions:
http://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/R052_016_2011_02_BFAB729553AB1.pdf
"5-13. Demotions and Terminations. In exceptional circumstances, the unit commander may demote a
CAP cadet for cause, up to a maximum of three steps in the Cadet Program (i.e.: three achievements, or
two achievements and a milestone award).
a. Notification and Effective Date. The unit commander notifies the cadet of the demotion in
writing, forwarding a courtesy copy to the commander at the next echelon. The demotion period begins the
date the unit commander approves the demotion request, if there is no appeal.
26 CAPR 52-16 1 NOVEMBER 2015
b. Re-Earning Achievements. The cadet will need to re-earn the demoted achievements and awards
through satisfactory performance over a period of 60 days per achievement or award (For example, a cadet
who had been insubordinate would need to show a willingness to follow directions and CAP rules). If the
cadetís performance does not warrant a one-achievement promotion at the end of 60 days, the unit commander
may initiate termination (see CAPR 35-3).
c. Appeals. The cadet may appeal the demotion decision by writing the commander of the next echelon,
courtesy copied to the unit commander, within 30 days of receiving the demotion notice.
(1) The commander at the next echelon (normally at the group or wing level) will rule on the
cadetís appeal request within 30 days of receiving the appeal request letter. This commander is the final
authority on all cadet demotion actions.
(2) Cadets who appeal a demotion are ineligible to progress in the Cadet Program until the
commander who has the appeals authority rules on the appeal. If the demotion is approved after an appeal,
the cadet will be immediately demoted. If the demotion is overturned after an appeal, the cadet will be allowed
to progress as if no demotion occurred.
(3) In evaluating an appeal, the commander reviews the facts of the situation, whether demotion was
the appropriate punishment and whether the demotion was carried out in accordance with this regulation. "


How you deal with this may well build a leader or lose a cadet.

If the parents are complicit, the writing may already be on the wall. Of course your ability to prove the allegation is key here, and I would strongly
encourage you to discuss this with your next higher HQ.

I would start with ascertaining the facts of the situation as best you can, and work from there.
I don't think an IG is necessary however getting one to help might bring the point home that CAP takes
Integrity violations very seriously.  It also somewhat removes you from the situation, but it might also
force your hand depending on the outcome, so consider it carefully.

With an adult, the "why" is irrelevant, cheating is cheating, but with an adolescent, who may not
have a good grasp of consequences, etc., or may have pressures you are unaware of such
as a special need that requires accommodation, we need to tread lightly, at least until all the cards are shown.

I would also say the age and phase of the cadet are relevent.  A 12 year old with helicopter parents doing this on Curry
is a different situation then a 16 year old doing it for a Phase II Achievement.  Whether this is chronic or an aberration
needs to be considered as well, not to mention if other CAP members, cadets or seniors were involved.

The direct answer to the OP is that this is not addressed directly in any reg, but needs to be handled like any other
serious violation of CAP's core Values, in this case "Integrity".  A suspension, demotion, or even termination should not
be off the table, but used in proportion to the actual infraction, and with the knowledge that kids make mistakes.

And of course it should go without saying that "Discretion is the better part of valor" here.  Whatever the situation and
outcome, it should be know to the smallest group possible.

« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 11:36:54 PM by Eclipse » Logged

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Eclipse
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« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2017, 11:31:04 PM »

I suppose the commander could require the cadets to do the online testing during a squadron meeting.  That way they can ensure the tests are done properly.  Not certain that is something a commander is allowed to require, however.

It's not, nor is it within their practical control.
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The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by eclipse. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

DocJekyll
Member

Posts: 81

« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2017, 08:43:50 AM »

Thanks Eclipse! That's exactly what I was looking for. I'm hoping this will be more of a learning experience than anything.
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Майор Хаткевич
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Posts: 5,966
Unit: GLR-IL-049

« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2017, 10:06:55 AM »

There was a similar Character Development lesson back in the day. I'm sure it's still in the books. Might be a good time to have the chaplain use it.

As a side note, It's open book, but the cadets still need to learn the material, and it certainly becomes an issue when they get to the proctored milestone tests.
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