December 07, 2022, 10:51:06 pm

1942 question..

Started by maurer172, February 07, 2012, 03:56:50 pm

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maurer172

(I'm hoping this is the right category  :D ) I was wondering how the cadet programs were in 1942, compared to now. Anything you know would be greatly appreciated!

-Thank You and Semper Vigilans!  ;D
Embrace The Suck, Unless the Suck is Obviously Wrong

bosshawk

I doubt that there was a cadet program in 1942.  CAP was brand new and concentrating on detecting German submarines along the Atlantic Coast.

Cadets likely (I really have no idea) came along after WWII, 1946 or so, if that early.
Paul M. Reed
Col, USA(ret)
Former CAP Lt Col
Wilson #2777

BillB

The Cadet programs started in October 1942. It was primarily for training of teens prior to going into the Army Air Corp. Much of the training materials and programs continued unchanged until 1964 when the current cadet training started with the achievements and milestones.
The 1943 cadet program required the learning of morse code, aircraft recognizition and first aid as part of the training and was more intensive than the current cadet program
Gil Robb Wilson # 19
Gil Robb Wilson # 104

a2capt

The cadet program as we know it now, based on what I've read, overheard and such seems to have it's roots starting about 1946. The war was over. Let's make something for everyone from this organization we've started.

BillB

There was no basic change in the cadet program betwen 1942 and 1946. There were new manuals produced in 1949 (often found on eBay). The manuals were in three volumes, the 3rd was the instructor manual. The 1949 manuals Volume 1 Book 1 was the Civil Air Patrol Manual which covered the history of CAP, it's missions and training. Vol 1 Book II covered the subject areas now covered by the entire series of cadet training material. And as mentioned Vol 1 Book III was the inetructor manual. Produced at the Government Printing Office the three manuals in total were 2 1/2 inches thick (I measured them)
Compared to todays cadet program, the material was more in depth (written for older cadets compared to todays manuals written for younger cadets) Spaatz cadets that have looked at the old manuals say that they are harder than todays program. And keep in mind cadet under the 1942 to 1964 could be mission pilots and observers and take part in CAP missions that now now not allowed.
Gil Robb Wilson # 19
Gil Robb Wilson # 104

Private Investigator

Quote from: BillB on February 08, 2012, 02:22:44 am
There was no basic change in the cadet program betwen 1942 and 1946. There were new manuals produced in 1949 (often found on eBay). The manuals were in three volumes, the 3rd was the instructor manual. The 1949 manuals Volume 1 Book 1 was the Civil Air Patrol Manual which covered the history of CAP, it's missions and training. Vol 1 Book II covered the subject areas now covered by the entire series of cadet training material. And as mentioned Vol 1 Book III was the inetructor manual. Produced at the Government Printing Office the three manuals in total were 2 1/2 inches thick (I measured them)
Compared to todays cadet program, the material was more in depth (written for older cadets compared to todays manuals written for younger cadets) Spaatz cadets that have looked at the old manuals say that they are harder than todays program. And keep in mind cadet under the 1942 to 1964 could be mission pilots and observers and take part in CAP missions that now now not allowed.


Thanks for sharing. That was very informative 

Spaceman3750

Quote from: BillB on February 08, 2012, 02:22:44 amAnd keep in mind cadet under the 1942 to 1964 could be mission pilots and observers and take part in CAP missions that now now not allowed.


They still can, they just have to be 18.

Grumpy

Quote from: Spaceman3750 on February 18, 2012, 10:02:17 pm
Quote from: BillB on February 08, 2012, 02:22:44 amAnd keep in mind cadet under the 1942 to 1964 could be mission pilots and observers and take part in CAP missions that now now not allowed.


They still can, they just have to be 18.


As a cadet from 1959 to 1963, I was a certified ground team member and working missions.