December 07, 2022, 11:17:45 pm

"Kiss Me Kate"

Started by Smoothice, August 09, 2011, 05:31:06 pm

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Smoothice

Based on the thread about the new Tuskeegee Airmen movie comming out, and thinking of Mustangs... I was a on P-51 Website and there is a still-flying one named "Kiss me Kate". I believe its the Tom Cruise one. Anyway.. it says in its life story (See below), in 1946, it was donated to a Civil Air Patol unit??  Any one have any information on that? What would a CAP unit do with it in 1946?


From the website:
1946: Donated to Civil Air Patrol unit
196?: Earl Reinert
1968: Victory Air Museum, IL
1982: Bill Conner, CA
1987: Joe Kasparoff, CA restoration
199?: Eddie Wachs, 1997 registered N51EW, restoration completed by Art Teeters at Cal Pacific Airmotive.
1998: Won Best P-51 at Oshkosh
2001: Vallhalla Aviation, Tom Cruise
2006: paint changed to "Kiss Me Kate"

Here is the link to some photos:
http://www.mustangsmustangs.com/p-51/p51survivors/pages/44-12840.php


Al Sayre

Back in the day ( Tuesday I think) CAP flew pretty much whatever they could lay hands on from Piper J-3's to Beech D-18's and Lockheed L10, L12, and L14's.   I've even heard stories about DC-3's in '45 and '46, but I don't know them to be true.  CAP could also screen almost anything piston powered out of DRMO (equivalent).  From what I've read, by the end of the war they were flying a lot of unarmed courier, transport and light cargo missions.   
Lt Col Al Sayre
MS Wing Staff Dude
Admiral, Great Navy of the State of Nebraska
GRW #2787

DakRadz

Sir, it was a Wednesday, actually.

The fact that we used to fly an aircraft now Tom Cruise's... That's pretty sweet. Icebreaker for celebrity recruiting, anyone?

BillB

USAF assigned DC-3's (actually C-47's) to each CAP-USAF Liaison Office. Many Wing Lisison Officers were issued C-45's the Beech D-18. These were in use up until the 1970's.
Gil Robb Wilson # 19
Gil Robb Wilson # 104

flyboy53

You're forgetting the B-25s.

When I was a cadet back in the 60s, I remember reading Air Trails or something like that and there was a whole story of a CAP unit in California that had an entire squadron (8 to 10) AT-6 Texans. The aircraft were overall yellow with the round emblem on the tails and nose.

They actually had their own base/airport to operate from.

Cliff_Chambliss

August 10, 2011, 02:18:37 pm #5 Last Edit: August 10, 2011, 03:05:45 pm by MIKE
I remember as a cadet flying to and from the CAP Summer encampment in a C-47.

During this period our squadron also had an assigned Aeronca L-16B and the squadron in the next town had an Piper L-18 and there was also an North American/Ryan L-17 available.

The "Good" Days.  Uniforms starched so much they would stand by themselves, tie tucked into the shirt between the 2d and 3d buttons, Bush Jackets (for a short period). 

As a new Senior Member, the great elation we pilots had when the Air Force 'gave' CAP bunches of Cessna O-1 Birddogs, & T-41's and Beech T-34 Mentors.

The 'fun' things we did back then.  "Mini" Squadron level SAREX's complete with misson  plans, assignments, etc.  Great Training.  Squadron level "encampments", usually weekend camping trips, but land navigation, map reading, First aid classes, etc.

CAP Actually used to be fun.
11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
2d Armored Cavalry Regiment
3d Infantry Division
504th BattleField Surveillance Brigade

ARMY:  Because even the Marines need heros.    
CAVALRY:  If it were easy it would be called infantry.

AdAstra

flyboy1,

You're referring to the 35th Air Rescue Squadron, based at the former San Fernando Airport. I'v been talking to a former squadron/group/sector commander who is putting the finishing touches on a squadron history. Lots of tall tales about a bunch of characters!

The T-6s were member-owned, not CAP, purchased for a song after WWII. There may have been more than the 8-10 you mentioned. I'm not clear what round emblems you are referring to. As I recall, it was a city-owned airport, but they must have had a hugh presence there. When the airport closed due to encroaching civilization, they moved to nearby Van Nuys Airport. The squadron was de-activated about five years ago, but the T-6s are still flying as "The Condor Squadron."
Charles Wiest

ol'fido

I would like to read that squadron history. For a long time now, people on this forum and elsewhere in CAP have been critical of "flying clubs", pilots that don't want to do anything with CP, were there for the free gas, "good old boys", etc. But WIWAC a lot of those WWII and Korea vets were still flying and running the program. They were "good old boys" and didn't put up with a lot of bureaucratic nonsense. But they were always willing to take a young cadet(Me) up on Sundays in an old beat up 0-1 that smelled like sweat, leather, and avgas. If I go to an airshow that has a Birddog sitting on the ramp, I stick my head in, close my eyes, and savor that smell. CAP for me was that smell, old GI issue furniture, and the sound of the wind across the ramp as we drilled.  :'(
Lt. Col. Randy L. Mitchell
Historian, Group 1, IL-006

flyboy53

August 11, 2011, 03:13:56 am #8 Last Edit: August 11, 2011, 03:20:22 am by flyboy1
Quote from: AdAstra on August 10, 2011, 09:48:09 pm
flyboy1,

You're referring to the 35th Air Rescue Squadron, based at the former San Fernando Airport. I'v been talking to a former squadron/group/sector commander who is putting the finishing touches on a squadron history. Lots of tall tales about a bunch of characters!

The T-6s were member-owned, not CAP, purchased for a song after WWII. There may have been more than the 8-10 you mentioned. I'm not clear what round emblems you are referring to. As I recall, it was a city-owned airport, but they must have had a hugh presence there. When the airport closed due to encroaching civilization, they moved to nearby Van Nuys Airport. The squadron was de-activated about five years ago, but the T-6s are still flying as "The Condor Squadron."


I figured they were member-owned. In my era of as a cadet (1966 -- 1971) that was pretty much the way it was in CAP. I don't really remember that may corporate aircraft, other than two T-28s in the PA Wing. I can tell you that being around that type of aircraft or the story of this California unit can be really inspiring for a cadet.

By 1972, I transferred to the Indiana Wing and they had a member-owned BT-13 (the pilot was Lt. Col. Wayne Ross who I flew three missions with as an observer) and one or more corporate O-1s -- which is how I got issued a flight helmet.

Guess I'm really dating myself....

It was this emblem:




TarRiverRat

I forget where I saw it but I have seen a B-25 with CAP markings and being used for transport, I believe, and an AT-6 Texan with CAP markings.  Believe it had Group 8 on the side of it.  The book was possibly the Flying Minute Men.  I lost my copy so I am unable to look it up and be sure.  Thought it was neat to see a B-25 with CAP markings.
Tar River Composite Squadron "River Rats" NC-057

NIN

Quote from: ol'fido on August 10, 2011, 11:56:22 pm
in an old beat up 0-1 that smelled like sweat, leather, and avgas. If I go to an airshow that has a Birddog sitting on the ramp, I stick my head in, close my eyes, and savor that smell. CAP for me was that smell, old GI issue furniture, and the sound of the wind across the ramp as we drilled.  :'(


Stop, you're making me homesick. :)
Darin Ninness, Col, CAP
Wing Dude
I like to have Difficult Adult Conversations™
Nothing posted on CAPTalk should be considered policy unless otherwise stated
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2007-2021 by NIN. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

ol'fido

Quote from: NIN on December 24, 2012, 05:12:00 am
Quote from: ol'fido on August 10, 2011, 11:56:22 pm
in an old beat up 0-1 that smelled like sweat, leather, and avgas. If I go to an airshow that has a Birddog sitting on the ramp, I stick my head in, close my eyes, and savor that smell. CAP for me was that smell, old GI issue furniture, and the sound of the wind across the ramp as we drilled.  :'(


Stop, you're making me homesick. :)
The  term is nostalgic and it's great isn't it! Let's try some more...Long  sleeve navy blue shirts....Old nylon flight jackets with your blues...Lunch Box radios... Old CBs rigged for 26.620...Army Surplus stores that actually sold army surplus... :'(
Lt. Col. Randy L. Mitchell
Historian, Group 1, IL-006

Critical AOA

Cramming a mission pilot, observer and scanner into a P-51 would be a tight fit. 
"I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it."   - George Bernard Shaw

PHall

Quote from: David Vandenbroeck on December 25, 2012, 02:48:06 am
Cramming a mission pilot, observer and scanner into a P-51 would be a tight fit.


Observer in the Left Wing Drop Tank and the Scanner in the Right Wing Drop Tank! >:D

SarDragon

December 25, 2012, 03:00:56 am #14 Last Edit: December 25, 2012, 03:04:54 am by SarDragon
Quote from: PHall on December 25, 2012, 02:53:29 am
Quote from: David Vandenbroeck on December 25, 2012, 02:48:06 am
Cramming a mission pilot, observer and scanner into a P-51 would be a tight fit.


Observer in the Left Wing Drop Tank and the Scanner in the Right Wing Drop Tank! >:D


Yeah, blivets with windows and intercoms.
Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
50 Year Member
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret

PHall

Quote from: SarDragon on December 25, 2012, 03:00:56 am
Quote from: PHall on December 25, 2012, 02:53:29 am
Quote from: David Vandenbroeck on December 25, 2012, 02:48:06 am
Cramming a mission pilot, observer and scanner into a P-51 would be a tight fit.


Observer in the Left Wing Drop Tank and the Scanner in the Right Wing Drop Tank! >:D


Yeah, blivets with windows and intercoms.


And if they get too annoying there's that STORES JETTISON button!

SarDragon

Quote from: PHall on December 25, 2012, 04:14:23 am
Quote from: SarDragon on December 25, 2012, 03:00:56 am
Quote from: PHall on December 25, 2012, 02:53:29 am
Quote from: David Vandenbroeck on December 25, 2012, 02:48:06 am
Cramming a mission pilot, observer and scanner into a P-51 would be a tight fit.


Observer in the Left Wing Drop Tank and the Scanner in the Right Wing Drop Tank! >:D


Yeah, blivets with windows and intercoms.


And if they get too annoying there's that STORES JETTISON button!


Oh, didn't I mention the little door in the top to check (and insert if necessary) the rack safety pin?
Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
50 Year Member
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret