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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Tall Tales  |  Topic: "Tid bits "O" Humor"
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Author Topic: "Tid bits "O" Humor"  (Read 25245 times)
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,864

« Reply #60 on: March 07, 2015, 12:48:32 PM »

Just as I thought...cadets CAN police themselves...  :o

If they're allowed to. ::)
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TexasBEAST
Member

Posts: 64
Unit: Alpha SAR

« Reply #61 on: March 19, 2015, 06:49:23 PM »

My name is Steven, and I had a supervisor on-shift at work today named Brian. We each sold some widgets at a great premium price early during the shift today, so the sup announced on the radio that we were "Team BS".

We saw a female co-worker nodding her head up and down and grinning from ear to ear at that.

Then Brian expounded on his earlier comment, "Of course, that's 'BS' for 'Best Sellers'."

The female co-worker made the thumbs-down sign and shook her head sideways.

At that point, I pointed out that the sup was forgetting about one of my buddies named Gilbert. I told him that that would actually make us "Team BSG . . . or Battlestar Galactica."

The radio went silent for several seconds.

And then Brian remarked, "You WOULD say something like that!"
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--TB
calebtornado12
Recruit

Posts: 49
Unit: RMR-ID-073

« Reply #62 on: May 25, 2016, 08:29:26 PM »

Alright, I've got a good one for y'all. A few weeks back, my flight received around 12 new cadets that just graduated our "New Cadet Program," and I was addressing them outside at this point. Here's what went down.

In total, I had about 25 cadets in the flight and we were outside, so i needed to raise my voice quite a bit so that everyone could hear me. Now.... being the growing teenager I am, sometimes yelling in general is a bad idea considering what can happen.

So we are standing in the flight, and I'm addressing all the cadets on how their chain of command works and who they need to contact and stuff like that. At the end of each statement, I would say "Is that understood?" but in a louder way, and the proper reply would normally be "Yes Sergeant."

So at the end of this final statement, I had been speaking for a long time at this point, and my throat was getting tired, and I asked one more time, "Is that understood?" But this one was different... I had been saying this one a bit louder than the others, when suddenly, on the "-Stood" part of "understood" my voice cracked in a way that I personally like to say was "majestic,"  8) but according to some other cadets, my voice "sounded like a piccolo being beaten by a rubber chicken."

I now have a new nickname in the squadron known by all.... "Sergeant Squeaky"

Oh, and did I mention, the majority of our Senior Staff was their to witness it.  ;D

   
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C/2nd Lt. Caleb Bryant
Boise Composite Flight Commander
RMR-ID-073
Off we go, into the 'Wild Blue Yonder'...
JeffDG
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 3,157

« Reply #63 on: May 25, 2016, 10:30:09 PM »

C/Msgt: I thought she said she had never eaten testicles before..
We called them Prairie Oysters.
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,061
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #64 on: May 25, 2016, 10:34:05 PM »

Re: Sgt Squeaky - that's a classic call sign assignment. You don't pick your own; it gets picked for you. And, the more you complain, the more it stick with you.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
calebtornado12
Recruit

Posts: 49
Unit: RMR-ID-073

« Reply #65 on: May 25, 2016, 10:49:29 PM »

Re: Sgt Squeaky - that's a classic call sign assignment. You don't pick your own; it gets picked for you. And, the more you complain, the more it stick with you.

I didn't give that to myself? That was given to me... And yes, the more complaining that happens, the worse it will get. I personally don't have a problem with that name, but I've seen other have that problem.
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C/2nd Lt. Caleb Bryant
Boise Composite Flight Commander
RMR-ID-073
Off we go, into the 'Wild Blue Yonder'...
SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,061
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #66 on: May 25, 2016, 11:23:59 PM »

Re: Sgt Squeaky - that's a classic call sign assignment. You don't pick your own; it gets picked for you. And, the more you complain, the more it stick with you.

I didn't give that to myself? That was given to me... And yes, the more complaining that happens, the worse it will get. I personally don't have a problem with that name, but I've seen other have that problem.

Never said you did. I was just pointing out, for the benefit of others, how call signs work. Not everyone, particularly cadets, knows the drill.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
calebtornado12
Recruit

Posts: 49
Unit: RMR-ID-073

« Reply #67 on: May 26, 2016, 05:15:38 PM »

Ah alright sir, sorry about that.
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C/2nd Lt. Caleb Bryant
Boise Composite Flight Commander
RMR-ID-073
Off we go, into the 'Wild Blue Yonder'...
grunt82abn
Seasoned Member

Posts: 201

« Reply #68 on: May 27, 2016, 12:44:10 AM »

If any wants additional "Tid bits "O" Humor" go check out the barrel role post. Hilarious!!! ;D ;D ;D
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Sean Riley, TSGT
US Army 1987 to 1994, WIARNG 1994 to 2008
DoD Firefighter Paramedic 2000 to Present
SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,061
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #69 on: May 27, 2016, 01:23:04 AM »

If any wants additional "Tid bits "O" Humor" go check out the barrel role post. Hilarious!!! ;D ;D ;D

I'd rather have a leading role. Better marquee position.  >:D
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
DakRadz
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,351

« Reply #70 on: May 27, 2016, 07:25:26 PM »

If any wants additional "Tid bits "O" Humor" go check out the barrel role post. Hilarious!!! ;D ;D ;D

I'd rather have a leading role. Better marquee position.  >:D

Ain't that the truth!

Glad I could oblige ;)
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Mordecai
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,078
Unit: SI

« Reply #71 on: November 14, 2017, 12:41:13 PM »

A long while ago:

Me: I'd like to implement a CRM system for the squadron. What are your thoughts?
Pilot: A CRM system for the squadron? That's a little extreme, don't you think?
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best_name_ever
Newbie

Posts: 4
Unit: MER-VA-117

« Reply #72 on: November 20, 2017, 04:53:47 PM »

This story is from last summer, my basic encampment.

Leading up to encampment, I was so psyched. I packed three weeks in advance and the day before, ate virtually nothing in anticipation. Looking back, that was a pretty stupid move.
 Anyway, on the way down to ft. Pickett, paranoid about being dehydrated, I chugged water the whole ride down. After in processing and contraband, everyone was issued a 16 oz canteen, and we were told to drink it every hour. Of course, this amount of water would be perfect during the week in the heat of July, but, since it was the first day, we weren't doing much exercise. Me being an overachiever, I decided  could do better and at dinner, full from so much water, I could barely eat. Not surprisingly, I started to feel sick, and thinking I was dehydrated, drank more. After pt I could barely walk and during the blister check almost passed out. I finally told a senior member that I was feeling awful, and hobbled over to medbay.  They gave me some tums, but I kept throwing up. After a while, they thought I would be ok, and sent me back to the barracks. Once I got back, I switched beds (I was on the top bunk) and still barfing, tried to go to sleep. In any case, the last thing I remember is me yelling out "Medic, please," and passing out dead on the floor. Dramatic, I know. :P After that, I don't remember anything, but apparently I had seizures. An ambulance came and I was whisked to the near by ER. They couldn't help me, so I was put back in the ambulance and driven to another hospital in Richmond, where I stayed. I was unconscious for three days, and after the doctors said I had drunk two gallons of water, and had gotten something called hyponatremia, or low sodium. First of all, I don't know how it is humanly possible to down two gallons of water in the first half day of encampment, but, hey, I did. :o Anyway, that experience has taught me a couple of things.  Eat before encampment, no matter how excited you are. ;) Drink water in moderation and don't be afraid to tell people if you are sick. I didn't get to finish encampment, but I can go back next year.

Hopefully you all were perfectly fine for your basic year.  8) 8) 8)
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audiododd
Recruit

Posts: 37
Unit: PCR-CA-096

« Reply #73 on: November 21, 2017, 04:05:41 AM »

This story is from last summer, my basic encampment.

Leading up to encampment, I was so psyched. I packed three weeks in advance and the day before, ate virtually nothing in anticipation. Looking back, that was a pretty stupid move.
 Anyway, on the way down to ft. Pickett, paranoid about being dehydrated, I chugged water the whole ride down. After in processing and contraband, everyone was issued a 16 oz canteen, and we were told to drink it every hour. Of course, this amount of water would be perfect during the week in the heat of July, but, since it was the first day, we weren't doing much exercise. Me being an overachiever, I decided  could do better and at dinner, full from so much water, I could barely eat. Not surprisingly, I started to feel sick, and thinking I was dehydrated, drank more. After pt I could barely walk and during the blister check almost passed out. I finally told a senior member that I was feeling awful, and hobbled over to medbay.  They gave me some tums, but I kept throwing up. After a while, they thought I would be ok, and sent me back to the barracks. Once I got back, I switched beds (I was on the top bunk) and still barfing, tried to go to sleep. In any case, the last thing I remember is me yelling out "Medic, please," and passing out dead on the floor. Dramatic, I know. :P After that, I don't remember anything, but apparently I had seizures. An ambulance came and I was whisked to the near by ER. They couldn't help me, so I was put back in the ambulance and driven to another hospital in Richmond, where I stayed. I was unconscious for three days, and after the doctors said I had drunk two gallons of water, and had gotten something called hyponatremia, or low sodium. First of all, I don't know how it is humanly possible to down two gallons of water in the first half day of encampment, but, hey, I did. :o Anyway, that experience has taught me a couple of things.  Eat before encampment, no matter how excited you are. ;) Drink water in moderation and don't be afraid to tell people if you are sick. I didn't get to finish encampment, but I can go back next year.

Hopefully you all were perfectly fine for your basic year.  8) 8) 8)

Dude!!  That's some serious stuff!!  An AF Basic Trainee died back in 2000 due, in part, to hyponatremia (also called 'water intoxication') - too much water causes an imbalance of sodium in the body, which in turn, pulls water from the blood and into the cells.  This causes swelling, which in the brain can be fatal.  I'm glad all you needed was a trip to the hospital.   It's fairly rare, since you need to drink gallons of water in a short time, but in the right environment -- as you showed -- it could happen.
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MSG Mac
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,787
Unit: MER-MD-071

« Reply #74 on: November 21, 2017, 06:47:05 AM »

This should be taught at every cadet activity as well as a subject in safety classes.
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Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
Spam
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 949
Unit: GA-001

« Reply #75 on: November 21, 2017, 12:02:58 PM »

This story is from last summer, my basic first encampment.

Leading up to encampment, I was so psyched. I packed three weeks in advance and the day before, ate virtually nothing in anticipation. Looking back, that was a pretty stupid move.
 Anyway, on the way down to ft. Pickett, paranoid about being dehydrated, I chugged water the whole ride down. After in processing and contraband, everyone was issued a 16 oz canteen, and we were told to drink it every hour. Of course, this amount of water would be perfect during the week in the heat of July, but, since it was the first day, we weren't doing much exercise. Me being an overachiever, I decided  could do better and at dinner, full from so much water, I could barely eat. Not surprisingly, I started to feel sick, and thinking I was dehydrated, drank more. After pt I could barely walk and during the blister check almost passed out. I finally told a senior member that I was feeling awful, and hobbled over to medbay.  They gave me some tums, but I kept throwing up. After a while, they thought I would be ok, and sent me back to the barracks. Once I got back, I switched beds (I was on the top bunk) and still barfing, tried to go to sleep. In any case, the last thing I remember is me yelling out "Medic, please," and passing out dead on the floor. Dramatic, I know. :P After that, I don't remember anything, but apparently I had seizures. An ambulance came and I was whisked to the near by ER. They couldn't help me, so I was put back in the ambulance and driven to another hospital in Richmond, where I stayed. I was unconscious for three days, and after the doctors said I had drunk two gallons of water, and had gotten something called hyponatremia, or low sodium. First of all, I don't know how it is humanly possible to down two gallons of water in the first half day of encampment, but, hey, I did. :o Anyway, that experience has taught me a couple of things.  Eat before encampment, no matter how excited you are. ;) Drink water in moderation and don't be afraid to tell people if you are sick. I didn't get to finish encampment, but I can go back next year.

Hopefully you all were perfectly fine for your basic first year.  8) 8) 8)

Fixed that for you, best name; doctrinally we do not refer to first time attendees as "basics" (and anyone who tells you differently needs to read the approved encampment staff handbook, where you will see "trainees" and "students"). See: https://www.capmembers.com/cadet_programs/activities/encampment/index.cfm


I agree, that's a pretty serious history, and yeah, its a good lesson learned for our amateur medics and amateur encampment staff. We've recently seen similar incidents of flushing partly due to encampment staff either under mixing or refusing to provide fluids with electrolytes (e.g. Gatorade) due to a perception that they're expensive or "too much trouble to mix", etc. I hope your story helps illustrate why we encourage a sensible, balanced approach.

Thanks for sharing, and best wishes for your upcoming encampment.


V/r
Spam

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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Tall Tales  |  Topic: "Tid bits "O" Humor"
 


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