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kwaaikat
Newbie

Posts: 4

« on: November 03, 2017, 10:06:16 PM »

Is there guidance on a disciplinary process to adress the following situation:
Cadets participate in an cyber patriot evening.  Some cadets are in the same room, they are all focussing on one computer. Another cadet, working on adiffrent computer accidentally bumps a wifi router from a table when he gets up.  He picks up the router, see there is some damage, but he thinks he can fix it by clicking most of the panels together. He places it back, not sure if it is functioning. Some cadets saw that it hapened, but did not think that the cadet broke the router, but saw that he worked on the panels.  A senior member later picks up the router to plug it in and see its broken. He asks the cadets if they know why it is broken. The cadets say they just saw it fell and that the cadet closest to it picked it up and seemed to have put it together. The cadet says he is not sure how the router came to fall as the cadet had their back turned, but thye put the pieces together to the bets of their knowledge. The cadet apologised for not informing the senior member sooner. The senior member asked if the cadet knew who caused the router to fall. The cadet denies any knowledge of how the router came about falling.  The senior member contact the Deputy Commander of cadets.  The Deputy asks to be put on speaker phone and ask the cadets to inform the senior member who did this.  The Deputy states that they can do it on an individual basis.  No cadets came forward implicating the cadet. The Deputy gives the cadets the option to e-mail the deputy also on an individual basis in order to tell the deputy what happened. The week following the incident the deputy sends a mail to cadets and parent saying that they will hold an inquiry to determine the guilty person. The cadet on seeing this mail responded with an email stating that the cadet is not sure why the router fell, but is pretty sure no cadets caused it to fall and that the cadet did not see it fell but only heard it fell. No senior member replied to the mail. On the squadron night the inquiry panel consisted of the following senior members: Squadron Commander, the Deputy Commander of Cadets, the 2 senior members that was present as well as the leadership development senior member, and the Cadet Commander a C/Capt.  they questioned all the cadets present and the cadet who sent the mail last. The cadet after being interrogated thoroughly only eventually admitted that the cadet bumped the table, causing the router to fall off and get damaged.

The cadet is a staff member and have been very dedicated and dilligent in attending weekly, encampments, wing events and promoting regularly.

I have a couple of questions:
Was the process necessary or fair to the cadet who was "found" guilty.
What should be an appropriate consequence to the cadet.
Is there any regulatory guidance procedure regulating "inquiries/inquests into cadets behaviors"
What could have been another way to handle the cadets actions more positively

Would be interesting to hear other
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GZCP31
Recruit

Posts: 5
Unit: SWR-AR-095

« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2017, 10:22:29 PM »

I only have an additional question. Why was the router so close to the edge of the table where it could easily be knocked off? It seams to me that appropriate risk management evaluation was not done prior. This could have prevented this from happening.
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Former OK Wing DCL/DCA Mid 90s, Rejoined after 17 years out.
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Eclipse
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Posts: 27,996

« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2017, 10:25:10 PM »

Inquiry panel?  That's not a CAP "thing".

A piece of equipment was broken, probably because it was somewhere it didn't belong and the
senior members who are actually supposed to be, you know, supervising, FAILED.

5 minutes on taking responsibility >if< you do something >deliberate<, otherwise forget it, move on.

Geez..."Inquiry panel"...seriously, >WHERE< do people come up with NONSENSE like this?

What could have been another way to handle the cadets actions more positively

Have the Commander review the regulations on what to do when corporate equipment is damaged.

Hint: It doesn't involve a tribunal.

I've had people total COVs and bend airplanes who got less grief then this / these cadets did over a piece
of $30 Chinese plastic that was probably where it didn't belong to start with.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2017, 10:28:30 PM by Eclipse » Logged

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Eclipse
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« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2017, 11:59:04 PM »

In the spirit of providing guidance...

When a piece of property is damaged, it's to be reported through ORMS, at which
point the Wing CC will appoint an investigator to complete a Report of Survey.

"Investigations", other then ROS', are only performed by properly appointed IGs, when necessary,
and generally based on a complaint, though a Wing CC could, I suppose, appoint one for something
like this if he wanted.

Disciplinary actions for cadets, when warranted, should start with a properly-phased CAPF 50 conference,
and in a case like this, involve parents, and be done in private.  Appropriate level of intensity,
as always, is key, and in this case, the level is "zero".

A situation like this could turn into hazing very quickly, and based solely on provided information
may well have ventured down that road.

Accidents happen.  If a cadet is suspected of an integrity violation, it's possible to ascertain
whether anything can be proved or not with low-intensity conversations (vs. tribunals), and
usually handled with a "knock it off" 3000psi stare.

Repeated issues are a different matter, handled with things like F50s, loss of staff roles,
demotions, LORs, etc., all private and discrete.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2017, 12:05:15 AM by Eclipse » Logged

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lordmonar
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« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2017, 12:12:11 AM »

I have a couple of questions:
Was the process necessary or fair to the cadet who was "found" guilty.
No.  You have set yourself up for a valid IG complain. 
Quote
What should be an appropriate consequence to the cadet.
Depends on what his offense is.   If it is just that he broke the WIFI....he should replace it or pay for the replacement.   If it is for not coming forward......well, I would say that you can expect a cadet to have 5th amendment rights and therefore I don't see how you can punish him for that.
Quote
Is there any regulatory guidance procedure regulating "inquiries/inquests into cadets behaviors"
NOPE NONE NADA.
Quote
What could have been another way to handle the cadets actions more positively
Let the commander with his advisors figure out what happened and then take action as needed.
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PATRICK M. HARRIS, SMSgt, CAP
Pacific Region
Mitchell 1969
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Unit: PCR-CA-051

« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2017, 01:12:38 AM »

I have a couple of questions:
Was the process necessary or fair to the cadet who was "found" guilty.
No.  You have set yourself up for a valid IG complain. 
Quote
What should be an appropriate consequence to the cadet.
Depends on what his offense is.   If it is just that he broke the WIFI....he should replace it or pay for the replacement.   If it is for not coming forward......well, I would say that you can expect a cadet to have 5th amendment rights and therefore I don't see how you can punish him for that.
Quote
Is there any regulatory guidance procedure regulating "inquiries/inquests into cadets behaviors"
NOPE NONE NADA.
Quote
What could have been another way to handle the cadets actions more positively
Let the commander with his advisors figure out what happened and then take action as needed.

I don’t like what happened, if it did happen as described. But 5th Amendment Rights don’t seem to be relevant here, as the matter was a non-criminal administrative inquiry. Of course, whether or not that inquiry should have happened is another matter.


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Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.
lordmonar
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« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2017, 02:35:12 AM »

I'm always suspect of discipline that is of the type "Cadet refused to admit that he/she did xyz".       

Same with "Cadets Apple and Brown, refused to tell me who did xyz".

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PATRICK M. HARRIS, SMSgt, CAP
Pacific Region
kwe1009
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 740

« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2017, 07:59:16 AM »

Suggest all Senior Members involved go through TLC-Basic and TLC-Intermediate as soon as possible.  Just based on the OP, a lot went wrong and most of it is the fault of Senior Members.  It can be assumed that the cadet did not immediately admit to any fault because there is a cloud of fear of messing up in the squadron.  If that is the case, that needs to change immediately.  The Cadet Program is about teaching young people to be leaders, part of that training is allowing them to make mistakes and not have to face a firing squad when mistakes are made.

I've had people total COVs and bend airplanes who got less grief then this / these cadets did over a piece of $30 Chinese plastic that was probably where it didn't belong to start with.

Very true.
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stillamarine
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« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2017, 10:25:57 AM »

I've had people total COVs and bend airplanes who got less grief then this / these cadets did over a piece
of $30 Chinese plastic that was probably where it didn't belong to start with.

I've seen homicide suspects get less grief than this.
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Tim Gardiner, 1st LT, CAP

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etodd
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 853

« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2017, 11:43:13 AM »


 The cadet apologised for not informing the senior member sooner.

And that should have been the end of it.

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kwe1009
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Posts: 740

« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2017, 12:09:39 PM »


 The cadet apologised for not informing the senior member sooner.

And that should have been the end of it.

This should be a teaching moment for all involved (cadet and SM).
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bluehoodie
Recruit

Posts: 10

« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2017, 08:42:01 PM »

The only person who should have been questioned was the team coach. If the coach was supervising them they would have seen a router being put back together. The coach should have also stepped in and stopped the interrogation of the team members.
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spaatzmom
Seasoned Member

Posts: 288

« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2017, 12:39:06 AM »

Sadly, it seems as though several adults have forgotten the definition of accident, ad that children when grilled by a group of  adults in a supervisory position are easily intimidated.

I do hope this kangaroo court followed some good practice rules while doing this, like parents were present for the minor children to be hmmm questioned.  If not, I hop they have deep pockets cause it could get rather expensive far out pricing the cost of replacing equipment which should have been properly monitored and in a safe position by the senior member in charge.

Ya a kid subjected to hard core questioning is going o try to cover their backside, but I see several adults are doing the same thing and in a morally superior fashion.  What they did was bullying those who look to them for leadership and guidance.  What did they just teach those cadets?  Nothing I would be proud to proclaim any connection with.
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kwaaikat
Newbie

Posts: 4

« Reply #13 on: November 05, 2017, 07:24:57 AM »

Thanks for the information and opinions provided.
I am thinking the following.  The cadet lied and there should be a consequence to him.  The consequence should promote a learning opportunity and strengthen the squadrons core by not "punishing" cadets by isolation. "You did wrong, now you are bad and you need to get better again before you are usefull to the squadron again". If that course of action will be followed it will be taken up the chain of command. My alternative suggestion, is to task the cadet as well as all the other cadets that was there to prepare and present to squadron cadets a talk on our core value Integrity. Not by saying we did it and thats what went wrong, but use it in a scenario and then let the cadets indicate where the value was compromised and what would have been an alternative course of action. I would like then that the cadets who lied only at the end tell the squadron that this was actually a real event in this squadron and that he was the cadet who messed up.  But that through counselling and support he can now teach others and now that he has experienced how not living up to our values can jeopardize your reputation as a cadet leadr is not worth not living up to our potential.

I firmly believe that any negative situation involving cadets should be dealt witn swiftly, fairly and with compassion.  We should always look for the learning opportunity in resolving, without scaring cadets. Discpline is born from respect not fear. I am not sure that this was at the center of this incident.

Couple of clarifications may be necessary to understand more of CAP prcedures.
The router was the private property of one of the senior members.  This senior member did the right thing to report that it was broken by accident and that no one took responsibility.  After that in my opinion all went wrong.

This is not a hypothetical scenario, i will post updates on the resolution. I trust the resolution will be positive.

Thanks again for giving input. Always good to check ones reasoning on matters like this.

Great forum and CAP is a great organization for adults and cadets. Any opportunity to make it even better should not be allowed to pass by because of inaction.
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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,317
Unit: Classified

« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2017, 09:39:25 AM »

There is so much wrong with this scenario, I wouldn't even know where to start to dissect it.  And I may be wrong but I am seeing some potential violations of CPP. 

No inquiry should have happened, no "interrogation" should have happened and ultimately this whole thing was blown out of proportion.  I have had to deal with some cadets but never once set up an inquiry or anything else.  And I made [darn] sure that I called the parent(s) of said cadet as well. 

OP were the cadets parents even told about this at all?  If not well don't be surprised if they pursue some action. 
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Chappie
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Posts: 1,052

« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2017, 12:08:12 PM »

Reading this for the first time....and I am wondering:  What in the blue blazes did I just read????   A tribunal is called for an accident????   If the cadet maliciously took the wifi/router and smashed it to pieces in a fit of anger or act of vandalism...then something should be said.   Prior to my recent retirement, I was an IT guy with a law enforcement agency with hundreds of personnel - 24/7 - and thousands of dollars worth of computer equipment: workstations, monitors, printers, scanners, laptops, mobile data computers (in-car systems), wifi routers, etc.   Things were always getting broken (nothing beats a shotgun that was being unlocked by the deputy riding "shotgun" making impact with the $3000 touchscreen monitor in the unit when the deputy driving in pursuit slammed on the brakes causing resulting in...well, you get the picture -- "can we fix this with Gorilla Glue????).  Chalked it up to a training matter.  Accidents happen....things get broken...repair or replace it...move on.    As for a "Core Value" issue....eventually the mystery of the broken router was solved.   I see this as a teaching/training moment.
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Chappie
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,052

« Reply #16 on: November 05, 2017, 12:17:08 PM »


<snip>

Couple of clarifications may be necessary to understand more of CAP prcedures.
The router was the private property of one of the senior members.  This senior member did the right thing to report that it was broken by accident and that no one took responsibility.  After that in my opinion all went wrong.

This is not a hypothetical scenario, i will post updates on the resolution. I trust the resolution will be positive.

Thanks again for giving input. Always good to check ones reasoning on matters like this.
<snip>



I have provided my personal property on occasions....and take full responsibility for it.   Always the watchful "hawk" and ensure that it is being used properly and in a manner in which damage can and should be limited.   As owner, I take the risk of providing it --- being aware that something could happen to it.







« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 12:22:04 PM by Chappie » Logged
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stillamarine
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« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2017, 03:23:06 PM »

Reading this for the first time....and I am wondering:  What in the blue blazes did I just read????   A tribunal is called for an accident????   If the cadet maliciously took the wifi/router and smashed it to pieces in a fit of anger or act of vandalism...then something should be said.   Prior to my recent retirement, I was an IT guy with a law enforcement agency with hundreds of personnel - 24/7 - and thousands of dollars worth of computer equipment: workstations, monitors, printers, scanners, laptops, mobile data computers (in-car systems), wifi routers, etc.   Things were always getting broken (nothing beats a shotgun that was being unlocked by the deputy riding "shotgun" making impact with the $3000 touchscreen monitor in the unit when the deputy driving in pursuit slammed on the brakes causing resulting in...well, you get the picture -- "can we fix this with Gorilla Glue????).  Chalked it up to a training matter.  Accidents happen....things get broken...repair or replace it...move on.    As for a "Core Value" issue....eventually the mystery of the broken router was solved.   I see this as a teaching/training moment.

True story. In 2009 we completely replaced our fleet of patrol assigned vehicles. Within 6 months 80% of the Coban MDTs did not work.
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USMCR    2001-2005  Admiral, Great State of Nebraska Navy  MS, MO, UDF
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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,317
Unit: Classified

« Reply #18 on: November 05, 2017, 04:17:31 PM »

The router was the private property of one of the senior members.  This senior member did the right thing to report that it was broken by accident and that no one took responsibility. 

If this is in fact the case, then the unit went overboard with this inquiry and if that was my cadet I'd be pissed and having some words with the CC and CDC. 

The SM brought personal property to a function (all inclusive term) and took the responsibility and liability that it may get damaged.  I have used my personal laptop and wi-fi hot spot for CAP on numerous occasions and even allowed other SM's to as well but at the end of the day had something happened to it the fault is on me not someone else. 

The cadet in question needs to rebut anything form of action that may have been handed down to the Grp CC, and the Grp CC needs to have a convo with the SM's involved with this. 
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Chappie
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« Reply #19 on: November 05, 2017, 04:24:21 PM »

Tim....  Wow!!!  80%.  Fortunately, our agency used DATA 9-1-1 products (California based company).   Had great warranty on MDC products (the broken screen was on us though due to operator error).   They replaced screens, hard drives, mics, cameras, antennas, etc. in a timely manner.  Older systems were being updated/replaced as I was transitioning into retirement.

Back to topic at hand....tech products get broken and need to be repaired/replaced.  Forgot to mention about a detective who shut a Toughbook laptop with his pen on top of the keyboard.  Oops. Screen not covered by warranty.

Concur with the observation by abdsp51.
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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,317
Unit: Classified

« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2017, 04:43:45 PM »

And yet my former defender brethren wonder why they never got comps in the cars.  Of course they totaled 2 sedans during my tenure as the Vehicle NCOIC for stupid reasons. 
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SarDragon
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« Reply #21 on: November 05, 2017, 06:37:35 PM »

Topic...
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Dave Bowles
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C/WO, CAP, Ret
kwe1009
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 740

« Reply #22 on: November 05, 2017, 08:11:30 PM »

Thanks for the information and opinions provided.
I am thinking the following.  The cadet lied and there should be a consequence to him.  The consequence should promote a learning opportunity and strengthen the squadrons core by not "punishing" cadets by isolation.

Before deciding what action, if any, to take against this cadet, look at it from their point of view.  He/she accidentally broke someone's personal property and basically was placed in front of a firing squad tribunal and was likely extremely nervous and fearing the end of their CAP career. 

I would recommend that you base your response to the cadet with that in mind. 
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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,317
Unit: Classified

« Reply #23 on: November 05, 2017, 09:32:20 PM »

Persobally, the cadet in question has been through enough.  Any further action is liable to do more harm than good and not generate the desired outcome. 

Let the matter drop...
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Mitchell 1969
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« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2017, 03:12:04 AM »

Reading this for the first time....and I am wondering:  What in the blue blazes did I just read????   A tribunal is called for an accident????   If the cadet maliciously took the wifi/router and smashed it to pieces in a fit of anger or act of vandalism...then something should be said.   Prior to my recent retirement, I was an IT guy with a law enforcement agency with hundreds of personnel - 24/7 - and thousands of dollars worth of computer equipment: workstations, monitors, printers, scanners, laptops, mobile data computers (in-car systems), wifi routers, etc.   Things were always getting broken (nothing beats a shotgun that was being unlocked by the deputy riding "shotgun" making impact with the $3000 touchscreen monitor in the unit when the deputy driving in pursuit slammed on the brakes causing resulting in...well, you get the picture -- "can we fix this with Gorilla Glue????).  Chalked it up to a training matter.  Accidents happen....things get broken...repair or replace it...move on.    As for a "Core Value" issue....eventually the mystery of the broken router was solved.   I see this as a teaching/training moment.

True story. In 2009 we completely replaced our fleet of patrol assigned vehicles. Within 6 months 80% of the Coban MDTs did not work.

At my PD we had a drill with new equipment that was being considered. We’d obtain prototypes and submit them to officers who were hard-chargers who knew how to get max utility from equipment.

If those guys, “The Breakers,” couldn’t break it, we’d generally buy it.


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_________________
Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.
Red 6
Recruit

Posts: 6
Unit: PCR-OR-055

« Reply #25 on: November 08, 2017, 08:03:20 PM »

Mitchell, I was present with a medium-sized SWAT team several years ago when an operator propped his HK416 against the side of a Bearcat. The driver, not knowing that the rifle was leaning on the vehicle, started to drive off, knocking the $1800 rifle with another thousand bucks worth of optics, laser thinggys and assorted doodads under the rear wheels. All of the thinggys were trashed. We figured the rifle was toast, but I called HK and they said to send it down to their repair facility.

Their lead armorer called us back a week or so later and said the only thing really wrecked was the rail, plus some cosmetic damage. He offered to fix it free of charge if we were okay with taking pictures for the engineer guys in Oberndorf. I'm sure they got a good laugh out of the dumb Americans, LOL.

Seriously though, I doubt the OP is reading this thread anymore, but I've been following with interest. As a former cadet in the 70s, and a relatively new SM, it occurred to me that we want cadets to come back. If a cadet gets grilled like a suspect, they will likely be finished with CAP, especially after their parents find out what happened. (An inquest? wow...) Also, something like that would send an incredibly negative signal to the rest of the cadets and SMs in the squadron. The phrase 'negative command climate' comes to mind.

Fun is one of the traits of cadet life. Treating somebody like the OP described would surely not fit into that shoe box. And that doesn't even begin to touch the core values that an inquest would impact.

-Mark-
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kwaaikat
Newbie

Posts: 4

« Reply #26 on: November 10, 2017, 06:23:37 AM »

Well the SAGA continues.  The Cadet in question has been informed that he is removed from his staff position and will not be eligible for promoting for 60 days.

I requested to speak to the Deputy Commander of Cadets in person, who informed me that on matters of cadet discipline she does not speak to other senior members personally but I am welcome to discusss the matter with her and the squadon commander. I did request the meeting to go ahead. During the meeting I raised my opinion that I believe the process is not supporting the CAP process of cadet education, but rather instilling a fear in the cadets for making mistakes. Both assured me that in this case there is no better resolution. I even shared my opinion on how it should be handled.  I was lectured on our CAP Values Integrity and Respect.

I do not mind cadets being disciplined when malice or intent is the drive behind negative actions. I just find it hypocritical almost reprehensible that these two individuals was part of the color guard of the squadron that took cadets to a national cadet competition sometime back. Obviously the cadets worked hard and won the qualifying rounds in their group, region and wing  The group were accommodated in a college dorm. The cadets, being bored one evening became rambunctious and by accident broke a door lock or something. In the fear of not being allowed to continue in the competition the senior members attempted to fix the broken door to a point where it was not noticeable and did not report the mishap.  The cadets won one of the top three places in the national competition. This was shared with me in confidence when three of the senior members was present and they still remarked how scared they were of being kicked out. Now I am wondering how they can make statements about integrity when they themselves make these mistakes and was not willing to face the consequences.

I am disappointed, but also proud of the cadet. The cadet indicated that he will take his punishment like a man, ensure that his behaviour will not let his integrity be questioned again and will not quit nor will he give up on CAP. But he will force them through resolve to try deny him his future promotions and then he will point out their behavior as provided for in the CAP regulations.

I am still evaluating how to handle the situation since I also learned tonight that the Deputy Commander of Cadets will at some point in future will be taking over as Squadron Commander.
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abdsp51
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« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2017, 09:35:25 AM »

Was a CAPF50 accomplished?  Also time for you to step away from the keyboard and if everything you have said is true goto the Gp CC.
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Spam
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« Reply #28 on: November 10, 2017, 02:17:52 PM »

Second that - need to document all progressive disciplinary actions beyond verbal prompts for on the spot correction (on the order of "cover, cadet" when outdoors, not "you're reprimanded and wont promote").

The documentation of suspension or freezes or other action should be given to the cadet (Form 50 and/or written letter). If he wishes to protest to the Group/CC, that's his right.

I would not air any more details or allegations here.

R/s,
Spam


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Eclipse
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« Reply #29 on: November 10, 2017, 02:32:01 PM »

+3 on the "not for air", assuming the details are correct, you've already provided way
more then enough to know exactly who this is and what unit, etc.

The whole thing is ridiculous, reads like a made up story designed to troll this board and
there should be seniors getting CAPF 40's with red pen if it's true.

Don't keep adding more detail here to make your case, we get it, this unit has serious
leadership issues, and is clearly pretty clueless on how to deal with adolescents, let alone cadets.

For those of you scoring at home, this is why parents should be more then "slow down enough to leap
from the car" involved with their cadets.
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,061
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« Reply #30 on: November 10, 2017, 05:17:45 PM »

And I think that about covers the fly-by.

Click.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
kwaaikat
Newbie

Posts: 4

« Reply #31 on: November 12, 2017, 04:50:41 PM »

APOLOGY FOR INCORRECT INFORMATION AND PURPOSE OF POSTS
Dear CAPTalk readers, the posts by myself in my personal capacity, initially started out to gain an understanding of others experience or thoughts on Cadet Discipline Procedures based on an incident that I described.  I deliberately changed some of the scenario details in order to keep the post as anonymous as possible.
In the follow-on posts, my descriptions of events became more personal and less anonymous.  Especially in the last post I mentioned details that were not necessary as well as not as anonymous as I should have kept it.  In the last post I also referred to an incident in an inaccurate way which I interpreted incorrectly not based on the true events that ensued.
I should not have posted the 2nd or 3rd posts as these were no longer themed to inform but to insult and get even.
I apologize unconditional to the Squadron, their cadets (especially the Color Guard Cadets) as well as leadership that was involved in the incident.  After looking at these posts again I realize that I have damaged reputations and did not have the Core Values of CAP at heart when posting.
The matter has been resolved by all concerned in a manner becoming of CAP leadership.
This was more of a lesson to me about how not to use a forum like this, I hope we can all learn from my mistakes
« Last Edit: November 12, 2017, 05:13:55 PM by kwaaikat » Logged
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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Cadet Programs Management & Activities  |  Topic: Cadet Disciplinary Process in a Squadron
 


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