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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Emergency Services & Operations  |  Topic: Longer Drone Flights
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etodd
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,201

« on: February 07, 2018, 08:21:57 PM »

Hybrid drones. Using a gas engine to keep the batteries charged. Up to 2 hours flight time with this one as opposed to 30 minutes or less that most can do with batts only:

http://www.walkera.com/index.php/Goods/info/id/49.html
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Live2Learn
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 634

« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2018, 06:43:28 PM »

Hybrid drones. Using a gas engine to keep the batteries charged. Up to 2 hours flight time with this one as opposed to 30 minutes or less that most can do with batts only:

http://www.walkera.com/index.php/Goods/info/id/49.html

It appears to be yet another platform designed to operate WAY beyond line of sight.  Perhaps the additional payload might include ADS/B-OUT.
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etodd
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,201

« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2018, 08:14:55 PM »

Hybrid drones. Using a gas engine to keep the batteries charged. Up to 2 hours flight time with this one as opposed to 30 minutes or less that most can do with batts only:

http://www.walkera.com/index.php/Goods/info/id/49.html

It appears to be yet another platform designed to operate WAY beyond line of sight.  Perhaps the additional payload might include ADS/B-OUT.

This will be good for farming surveys. Where they might be shooting 500 or 1000 acres at 200 feet. Less time coming back home to change batteries will greatly increase productivity. While even out in the country the line of sight rule is technically still there, its rarely adhered to. You can't run survey lines of 500 acres and keep it in sight at all times. Good for inner city use, but the FAA needs to relax that rule for farm and other similar uses.
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PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,145

« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2018, 10:08:12 PM »

Hybrid drones. Using a gas engine to keep the batteries charged. Up to 2 hours flight time with this one as opposed to 30 minutes or less that most can do with batts only:

http://www.walkera.com/index.php/Goods/info/id/49.html

It appears to be yet another platform designed to operate WAY beyond line of sight.  Perhaps the additional payload might include ADS/B-OUT.

This will be good for farming surveys. Where they might be shooting 500 or 1000 acres at 200 feet. Less time coming back home to change batteries will greatly increase productivity. While even out in the country the line of sight rule is technically still there, its rarely adhered to. You can't run survey lines of 500 acres and keep it in sight at all times. Good for inner city use, but the FAA needs to relax that rule for farm and other similar uses.

No, you need to follow the rules.
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Live2Learn
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 634

« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2018, 01:26:25 AM »

Hybrid drones. Using a gas engine to keep the batteries charged. Up to 2 hours flight time with this one as opposed to 30 minutes or less that most can do with batts only:

http://www.walkera.com/index.php/Goods/info/id/49.html

It appears to be yet another platform designed to operate WAY beyond line of sight.  Perhaps the additional payload might include ADS/B-OUT.

This will be good for farming surveys. Where they might be shooting 500 or 1000 acres at 200 feet. Less time coming back home to change batteries will greatly increase productivity. While even out in the country the line of sight rule is technically still there, its rarely adhered to. You can't run survey lines of 500 acres and keep it in sight at all times. Good for inner city use, but the FAA needs to relax that rule for farm and other similar uses.

Wasn't this "out of sight" and unfortunately out of mind the problem with the drone/Blackhawk rotorwing collision just a few short months ago???  Maybe reference to this (https://www.faa.gov/uas/media/AC_107-2_AFS-1_Signed.pdf) might be helpful.  The section on operator/pilot accountability is interesting.
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sardak
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,195

« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2018, 01:44:34 PM »

Quote
This will be good for farming surveys. Where they might be shooting 500 or 1000 acres at 200 feet. Less time coming back home to change batteries will greatly increase productivity. While even out in the country the line of sight rule is technically still there, its rarely adhered to. You can't run survey lines of 500 acres and keep it in sight at all times. Good for inner city use, but the FAA needs to relax that rule for farm and other similar uses.
Fixed wing UAVs are already capable of flying areas of this size on a single charge. It comes down to picking the right aircraft for the job. Also, you're allowed to pilot the UAV from a moving vehicle in sparsely populated areas. And if need be, a waiver to fly beyond visual line of sight can be requested. No need to relax any rules.

Quote
Wasn't this "out of sight" and unfortunately out of mind the problem with the drone/Blackhawk rotorwing collision just a few short months ago???
Yes. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this incident to be: the failure of the sUAS pilot to see and avoid the helicopter due to his intentional flight beyond visual line of sight. Contributing to the incident was the sUAS pilot's incomplete knowledge of the regulations and safe operating practices.
Findings
Personnel issues
Monitoring other aircraft - Pilot (Cause)
Use of policy/procedure - Pilot (Cause)
Knowledge of procedures - Pilot (Factor)
Knowledge of regulatory reqs - Pilot (Factor)

After the UAV didn't come back from the collision with the helo, the "pilot" bought a new one the next day. This was the second time his aircraft didn't return and the solution was just to buy another one each time.

Mike
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etodd
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,201

« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2018, 09:13:02 PM »

I didn't say 'break the rules' .... I said the FAA should change it.  And as another mentioned, you can already get a waiver for it. And all of you know thats coming soon anyway, as Amazon and all these companies start delivering packages via drone.  There will not be visual observers for deliveries.

Its getting close to a whole new ball game.
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PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,145

« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2018, 11:05:31 PM »

Personally, I don't think we'll ever see packages delivered by drones. At not until they have enough AI in them to be able to do the job better then the humans do now.
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Emergency Services & Operations  |  Topic: Longer Drone Flights
 


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