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February 17, 2018, 09:37:19 PM
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Emergency Services & Operations  |  Topic: Top official resigns after false missile alert in Hawaii
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Author Topic: Top official resigns after false missile alert in Hawaii  (Read 498 times)
Cicero
Seasoned Member

Posts: 210
Unit: TBKS

« on: January 30, 2018, 07:05:20 PM »

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/human-error-inadequate-safeguards-blamed-162153888.html

The fallout came the same day the Federal Communications Commission revealed that the worker who pushed out the alert thought an actual attack was imminent. It was the first indication the Jan. 13 alert was purposely sent, adding another level of confusion to the misstep that left residents and tourists believing their lives were about to end.

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1st Encampment 1973
2nd Staff 1976
Mitchell 1976
Earhart 1976
Eaker 1977
1st Lt, CAP
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,941

« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2018, 09:54:51 PM »

The Warning Officer who sent the alert has been fired. Not the first time he has been confused about Exercise messages.
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Geber
Recruit

Posts: 33
Unit: NER-VT-009

« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2018, 12:12:41 PM »

The Warning Officer who sent the alert has been fired. Not the first time he has been confused about Exercise messages.

Long ago I created a personal policy that if there were a real event, I would never use the word "drill". If someone were to ask me "Is this a drill" my reply would be something like "This is a real world event. I refuse to say the word that starts with d. Do not use the word that starts with d during this real event!."

I have read that CAP uses, among other things, the phrase "no play" to indicate an event is real. It would be a sound policy to never use the word "play" during an exercise. That way, if the word "no" is unreadable, the word that is heard alone is sufficient to classify the situation:

If I hear "exercise" or "drill" it's a drill.

If I hear "real", "authentic", "genuine", or "play" it's real.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2018, 12:17:08 PM by Geber » Logged
Blanding
Recruit

Posts: 24
Unit: MER-VA-102

« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2018, 01:37:01 PM »

The Warning Officer who sent the alert has been fired. Not the first time he has been confused about Exercise messages.

If I hear "real", "authentic", "genuine", or "play" it's real.

I'd hate to not have a chat with whatever committee didn't decide not to use no play to signal that we were not passing exercise traffic.
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Cicero
Seasoned Member

Posts: 210
Unit: TBKS

« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2018, 10:25:19 PM »

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5335047/Hawaii-missile-employee-confused-drills-reality-before.html

As part of it, a recording was played through a speakerphone at the State Warning Point which included the words 'this is not a drill'.

That was not meant to be played but it was played alongside the drill recording which said 'exercise' six times.

The employee said he did not hear 'exercise' and only focused on 'this is not a drill' so pushed the button to send out the alert. 


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1st Encampment 1973
2nd Staff 1976
Mitchell 1976
Earhart 1976
Eaker 1977
1st Lt, CAP
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Emergency Services & Operations  |  Topic: Top official resigns after false missile alert in Hawaii
 


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