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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Tall Tales  |  Topic: Closest Calls
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Author Topic: Closest Calls  (Read 19493 times)
Cadet Tillett
Recruit

Posts: 46

CAP Cadet Commander's Forum
« Reply #40 on: September 25, 2007, 10:43:48 AM »

Oh, FIRE you say.   Take a look at this picture.   I was IFR at 10,000' msl going from OKV to DAN in another airplane last month and had a whopping smell of AVGAS in the cockpit as I adjusted my fuel flow.   Good thing was this came from the #5 cylinder and not #1 or #3.   #5 was most near the firewall.   Fuel from the #1 or #3 intake line would have sprayed AVGAS on the exhaust manifold.   The blue you see on the firewall and engine mount is the coloring added to 100LL AVGAS.

This was a T model 182 and it had undergone the mandatory check for injection line leakage within the past 20 hrs (AD 2002-26-01 for you A&P gurus).

Landed safely and mechanic tightened the line.  No further leaks although I did have to throw away those pants as I'd never get the smell out.

Wow.  I flew in that same plane once.  lol
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C/Capt. Tillett, NCWG
Wright Brothers #4609
Mitchell #54148
Earhart #14039
jimmydeanno
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,155
Unit: ǝnƃoɹ

« Reply #41 on: September 25, 2007, 10:59:31 AM »

ummm...me too! That's the plane I qualed as an observer in.
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If you have ten thousand regulations you destroy all respect for the law. - Winston Churchill
addo1
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 535
Unit: SWR

TRIXATION ILLUSIONS
« Reply #42 on: September 25, 2007, 06:11:54 PM »

  Good stories!  Keep them coming in!!   ;D
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Addison Jaynes, SFO, CAP
Coordinator, Texas Wing International Air Cadet Exchange


National Cadet Advisory Council 2010
SJFedor
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,691

« Reply #43 on: September 27, 2007, 10:11:53 AM »


(Yes, they were CAP planes)
Good question, I'm not entirely sure.  I think the FLMs would be responsible since the pilots are following our directions.  But if the pilots aren't doing what we say and going on their own, maybe its their fault.  Not sure, good question.  As for nationals and wing, I'm just glad it wasn't at the mission before that when we were under AF eval.

Honestly, the pilot should have shut down for a multitude of reasons. 1) not enough wing walkers to ensure safety, 2) Operational temp too high on ramp, too much possibility of an oopsie.

As a marshaller, you (and your supervisor) probably should have stopped the plane outside the ramp area, and waited until a 3rd became available. There's nothing we do, especially in training missions, that an extra 2 minutes will harm.

The pilot is ultimately responsible. The FLMs name would probably be in the safety report, but, it's ultimately the driver of the bus's butt.

There was a nice system on the flight line at NESA. If you didn't like how it looked, or the FLM didn't like how it looked, either could call an immediate stop and shut down and discuss it with the prop stopped. I actually did it once myself because they were bringing me into a very tight space. Ended up with about 2 feet on each wing tip, but I would have rather pushed the last 10 feet and know I'm clear, then do it under power and find out that I'm not.
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Steven Fedor, NREMT-P
Master Ambulance Driver
Former Capt, MP, MCPE, MO, MS, GTL, and various other 3-and-4 letter combinations
NESA MAS Instructor, 2008-2010 (#479)
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,040

« Reply #44 on: September 27, 2007, 12:21:47 PM »

By Recruiter...
^"If you were the best pilot around, you'd be piloting Air Force One, not a Cessna 182".

The Marine pilot of HMX-1 might argue that......
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SDF_Specialist
Banned

Posts: 804

« Reply #45 on: September 27, 2007, 12:52:58 PM »

By Recruiter...
^"If you were the best pilot around, you'd be piloting Air Force One, not a Cessna 182".

The Marine pilot of HMX-1 might argue that......


Yeah, probably. I do give all pilots credit though. For some, it would take nerves of steel to fly. I personally love flying, and hope to get a pilot's license someday soon.
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SDF_Specialist
Al Sayre
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,513
Unit: SER-MS-001

Mississippi Wing
« Reply #46 on: September 27, 2007, 02:25:31 PM »

It doesn't take nerves of steel to learn to fly, just bags of money... ;D
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Lt Col Al Sayre
MS Wing Staff Dude
Admiral, Great Navy of the State of Nebraska
GRW #2787
SDF_Specialist
Banned

Posts: 804

« Reply #47 on: September 27, 2007, 03:14:45 PM »

That's why I said someday :D Of course I have to get a medical first. I'm just hoping that that won't prohibit me from getting my pilots license.
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SDF_Specialist
Al Sayre
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,513
Unit: SER-MS-001

Mississippi Wing
« Reply #48 on: September 27, 2007, 03:44:23 PM »

If you are serious about not passing your medical, DON'T GET ONE!!! Once you fail a flight physical you are seriously screwed trying to get it back Took me 3 years and countless rounds of correspondence with the FAA in OK City, and now I have a pilot in my Squadron who is going through the same thing...

Better to spend an extra 75 bucks and ask your flight surgeon for a routine annual physical and then ask "Oh by the way what are my chances of passing a flight physical?"  If there are no issues, then schedule it and pay him again, if there are then get them taken care of first or resign yourself to Light Sport on your DL.  Once you fill out the flight physical forms, the flight surgeon has to report your results.  If you fail you can't even fly light sport on your DL.
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Lt Col Al Sayre
MS Wing Staff Dude
Admiral, Great Navy of the State of Nebraska
GRW #2787
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,040

« Reply #49 on: September 27, 2007, 03:59:14 PM »

^^^^  Yup Yup.

I knew a guy who was preparing to solo, and it came up that he had gall stones in the past....distant past.   And they DQ'd him.    I think he coorpsponded with the FAA for over 6 months trying to explain to them that it had been 15+ years.   By the time he had finally gotten the OK to pass, he pretty much had to start over because he had forgotten everything.  Unfortunately he decided piloting just wasnt meant to be.
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SDF_Specialist
Banned

Posts: 804

« Reply #50 on: September 27, 2007, 04:27:58 PM »

OK. I have 20/400 vision in my left eye, and 20/20 in my right. I was told that the most to be concerned about is depth perception. I have fine depth perception. This is the only problem I have. Would this bar me from having a pilot's license?
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SDF_Specialist
Al Sayre
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,513
Unit: SER-MS-001

Mississippi Wing
« Reply #51 on: September 27, 2007, 05:06:39 PM »

Not as long as your vision is correctible to 20/40 (I think) for a private.
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Lt Col Al Sayre
MS Wing Staff Dude
Admiral, Great Navy of the State of Nebraska
GRW #2787
SDF_Specialist
Banned

Posts: 804

« Reply #52 on: September 27, 2007, 06:34:21 PM »

I don't know if my vision is correctable. I went to a chiropractor last year for a physical for the police academy. The subject of my eyes came up, and I told him about my left eye. He asked if I had peripheral vision in it, and I do. He asked if I could distinguish colors, and I can. He asked if my vision is blurred, and it is. He told me that what he think may be the problem is that I need a contact to reflect the light into my eye the proper way. He said this because he said he had the same problems with his right eye, and that's what fixed it up. I'm hoping to get to a friend of my wife's who is an optometrist, and suggest this. If that works, then the sky is the limit.
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SDF_Specialist
SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 10,126
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #53 on: September 28, 2007, 04:18:08 AM »

I don't know if my vision is correctable. I went to a chiropractor last year for a physical for the police academy. The subject of my eyes came up, and I told him about my left eye. He asked if I had peripheral vision in it, and I do. He asked if I could distinguish colors, and I can. He asked if my vision is blurred, and it is. He told me that what he think may be the problem is that I need a contact to reflect the light into my eye the proper way. He said this because he said he had the same problems with his right eye, and that's what fixed it up. I'm hoping to get to a friend of my wife's who is an optometrist, and suggest this. If that works, then the sky is the limit.

I think you ought to consider seeing an opthamologist over an optometrist. They have more detailed and exrtensive knowledge of the eye.

As for the differences in vision problems, there are three areas they check - acuity, astimatism, and muscle balance.

Acuity is your basic 20/[number] that defines how well you see. There is a near vision number, and a distant vision number. They can, and usually do, vary.

Astigmatism is the inability to focus uniformly on lines going in different directions.

Muscle balance problems cause an inability for both eyes to focus on the same point, causing double vision and poor depth perception.

I happen to have all three problems in my eyes, and have the expensive prescription to attempt to fix it all.

I thought I had a post on here or CS with more info, but can't seem to find it.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,040

« Reply #54 on: September 28, 2007, 06:24:53 PM »

You went to a Chiropractor for a police physical and talked about your eyes? 
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SDF_Specialist
Banned

Posts: 804

« Reply #55 on: September 28, 2007, 06:48:40 PM »

He was charging $10 for a physical. I was referred to him by the college that hosted the academy. He wanted me to look at an eye chart. That's how the subject of my eyes came about. I know, it's a strange situation.
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SDF_Specialist
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,040

« Reply #56 on: September 28, 2007, 08:47:24 PM »

Cuz I have a veterenarian I could refer you to. ;D
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SDF_Specialist
Banned

Posts: 804

« Reply #57 on: September 28, 2007, 09:03:52 PM »

Cuz I have a veterenarian I could refer you to. ;D

Does he work with back problems? That's my main concern right now :D
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SDF_Specialist
addo1
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 535
Unit: SWR

TRIXATION ILLUSIONS
« Reply #58 on: October 01, 2007, 10:07:00 AM »

Cuz I have a veterenarian I could refer you to. ;D

Does he work with back problems? That's my main concern right now :D

Or knee problems?  That is my main concern right now!   :D
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Addison Jaynes, SFO, CAP
Coordinator, Texas Wing International Air Cadet Exchange


National Cadet Advisory Council 2010
ThorntonOL
Seasoned Member

Posts: 254

« Reply #59 on: July 01, 2008, 11:14:11 AM »

Well this might be a little off topic, but a couple years ago my unit was invited to a model airplane event they where hosting and a few of the unit showed up and we were allowed to fly them once the owners got their planes in the air.
When it got to my turn my dad (current commander at the time) was already flying.
Well to make a short story shorter we end up almost hitting each other head on in midair but we were able to miss each other only to just about  on top of the other with wheels touching. (Actually almost touching.) Any closer and I would have been out a nice chunk of change.
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Former 1st Lt. Oliver L. Thornton
NY-292
Broome Tioga Composite Squadron
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Tall Tales  |  Topic: Closest Calls
 


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