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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Aviation & Flying Activities  |  Topic: UAV/UAS/Drone licenses and current / future use in CAP
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Author Topic: UAV/UAS/Drone licenses and current / future use in CAP  (Read 4155 times)
EMT-83
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,805

« Reply #40 on: September 06, 2017, 09:28:11 PM »

I'm willing to bet that none of the Cajun Navy cares one bit about who gets credit for anything. The people who were there know what happened, as does just about everyone in the country with a pulse.
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SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 9,995
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #41 on: September 07, 2017, 12:54:53 AM »

^^^^^

This. Texans takin' care of Texans. I doubt the Florida bubbas will be as accommodating.
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Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
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LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,690
Unit: Earth

« Reply #42 on: September 07, 2017, 08:37:37 AM »

I wonder if they will get any credit in the end? I'd bet any gov't agency is refusing to keep track of those. LOL

I have yet to meet anyone that seems to care whether they get credit or not.  I definitely do not expect (nor do I care) to get any credit for the people I helped out of a car during Harvey.  It is not that any gov't agency is refusing, rather just too many to accurately keep track of considering there is no real records.
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Luis R. Ramos
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Posts: 2,497

« Reply #43 on: September 07, 2017, 09:56:48 AM »

Etodd, the following link is to a photo of a swamp boat used to evacuate a resident after Katrina...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airboat#/media/File:FEMA_-_14511_-_Photograph_by_Jocelyn_Augustino_taken_on_08-30-2005_in_Louisiana.jpg
« Last Edit: September 07, 2017, 10:04:36 AM by Luis R. Ramos » Logged

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stillamarine
400,000th Post Author
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« Reply #44 on: September 07, 2017, 10:14:24 AM »

^^^^^

This. Texans takin' care of Texans. I doubt the Florida bubbas will be as accommodating.

Uh Floridians are just as willing to help their statesmen after a natural disaster. We have a little practice doing it.
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Tim Gardiner, 1st LT, CAP

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Luis R. Ramos
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Posts: 2,497

« Reply #45 on: September 07, 2017, 10:19:51 AM »

Or those in Louisiana, if we believe the description in the URL of the photo I posted...
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etodd
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« Reply #46 on: September 07, 2017, 10:51:28 PM »

Etodd, the following link is to a photo of a swamp boat used to evacuate a resident after Katrina...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airboat#/media/File:FEMA_-_14511_-_Photograph_by_Jocelyn_Augustino_taken_on_08-30-2005_in_Louisiana.jpg

Plenty of room at the front for a drone lauch pad.  I'm ready to join the CAP Navy as boat pilot or drone pilot.  ;D
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Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #47 on: September 08, 2017, 09:34:17 PM »

A launch pad and underneath, a hangar for another drone. Two drone pilots, a boat operator, or captain. in the hangar, space for several batteries being charged at once.

Pretty cool!
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Fubar
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« Reply #48 on: September 09, 2017, 05:56:08 PM »

The Red Cross apparently has an active drone program already:



Interesting idea keeping it tethered to the ground.
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etodd
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Posts: 765

« Reply #49 on: September 10, 2017, 11:40:20 PM »


Interesting idea keeping it tethered to the ground.

As long as its tethered, the FAA doesn't regulate it. No Part 107 needed even for commercial ops. Its like a tethered blimp that photographers have been using for many years.
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Mitchell 1969
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« Reply #50 on: September 11, 2017, 05:26:22 AM »


Interesting idea keeping it tethered to the ground.

As long as its tethered, the FAA doesn't regulate it. No Part 107 needed even for commercial ops. Its like a tethered blimp that photographers have been using for many years.

I still think it weird to see references to FAR Part 107, do a double take and remind myself that it no longer covers AVSEC.

And time marches on.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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etodd
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Posts: 765

« Reply #51 on: September 11, 2017, 07:14:39 PM »



As long as its tethered, the FAA doesn't regulate it. No Part 107 needed even for commercial ops. Its like a tethered blimp that photographers have been using for many years.


And I was wrong. The FAA clarified that awhile back. A self-powered object like a drone, is covered under the UAS rules, tethered or not.
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sardak
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« Reply #52 on: September 11, 2017, 07:54:20 PM »

"A team of University of Colorado engineers has developed a new drone "swarming" technology, which allows a single operator to control multiple unmanned aircraft simultaneously. This may help cover more ground, or air, while monitoring hiking areas and natural preserves marked by vast and rugged landscapes.

"The CU team, in collaboration with the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, spent three weeks in August testing this new technology at the Pawnee National Grassland northeast of Greeley. The project was granted the first-ever approval by the Federal Aviation Administration to allow multiple aircraft to be manned by a single pilot.

"Having multiple drones in the air, coordinating with one another to track the same target, will allow for multiple angles to triangulate exactly where the [radio beacon] signal is coming from whether it be a lost hiker or a tagged mountain lion," [Associate Professor Eric] Frew said."


Full story: http://www.dailycamera.com/cu-news/ci_31286472/cu-boulder-team-taps-drone-technology-help-track

Mike
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blackrain
Seasoned Member

Posts: 297

« Reply #53 on: September 12, 2017, 08:23:35 PM »

Was talking to an Air Force pilot who formerly flew manned aircraft and now operates UAVs (full size Reaper as I recall) and he felt that they could replace most of the fixed wing aircraft working Harvey with the capabilities that he could fit on and in his military UAVs. I couldn't argue that it was the future of a lot of things aerial imagery wise. You could easily launch them them reasonably far from the disaster and beam the imagery easily anywhere in the country including the government agencies headquartered in D.C. Though that does raise its own Big Brother implications which is a whole another discussion. Are/were they flying over the areas devastated by the disaster (s)? Can't say but honestly wouldn't really surprise me as they have been used already over fires out west.  I see bandwidth and spectrum capacity as a limiting factor in the future. As said before UAVs are to GWOT what the helicopter was to Viet Nam. Agree our CAP piloting days are numbered for most missions. 
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"If you find yourself in a fair fight, you didn't plan your mission properly" PVT Murphy
etodd
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 765

« Reply #54 on: September 13, 2017, 12:14:26 PM »

Was talking to an Air Force pilot who formerly flew manned aircraft and now operates UAVs (full size Reaper as I recall) and he felt that they could replace most of the fixed wing aircraft working Harvey with the capabilities that he could fit on and in his military UAVs. I couldn't argue that it was the future of a lot of things aerial imagery wise. You could easily launch them them reasonably far from the disaster and beam the imagery easily anywhere in the country including the government agencies headquartered in D.C. Though that does raise its own Big Brother implications which is a whole another discussion. Are/were they flying over the areas devastated by the disaster (s)? Can't say but honestly wouldn't really surprise me as they have been used already over fires out west.  I see bandwidth and spectrum capacity as a limiting factor in the future. As said before UAVs are to GWOT what the helicopter was to Viet Nam. Agree our CAP piloting days are numbered for most missions.

Bingo.  I've been in the control rooms standing behind the pilots and camera operators of Predators and seen the incredible visuals they can get, and the huge area they can cover. One Predator/Reaper type of UAV could have done the work of the 24 C-182s flying over Houston and been sending back live video instantly the whole time. Yes, something like that is the future.
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Alaric
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« Reply #55 on: September 13, 2017, 12:16:39 PM »


Interesting idea keeping it tethered to the ground.

As long as its tethered, the FAA doesn't regulate it. No Part 107 needed even for commercial ops. Its like a tethered blimp that photographers have been using for many years.

I still think it weird to see references to FAR Part 107, do a double take and remind myself that it no longer covers AVSEC.

And time marches on.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Because of my job whenever I see FAR I immediately thing they are referring to the Federal Acquisition Regulations :)
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Mordecai
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,046
Unit: SI

« Reply #56 on: September 13, 2017, 12:29:45 PM »

Was talking to an Air Force pilot who formerly flew manned aircraft and now operates UAVs (full size Reaper as I recall) and he felt that they could replace most of the fixed wing aircraft working Harvey with the capabilities that he could fit on and in his military UAVs. I couldn't argue that it was the future of a lot of things aerial imagery wise. You could easily launch them them reasonably far from the disaster and beam the imagery easily anywhere in the country including the government agencies headquartered in D.C. Though that does raise its own Big Brother implications which is a whole another discussion. Are/were they flying over the areas devastated by the disaster (s)? Can't say but honestly wouldn't really surprise me as they have been used already over fires out west.  I see bandwidth and spectrum capacity as a limiting factor in the future. As said before UAVs are to GWOT what the helicopter was to Viet Nam. Agree our CAP piloting days are numbered for most missions.

Bingo.  I've been in the control rooms standing behind the pilots and camera operators of Predators and seen the incredible visuals they can get, and the huge area they can cover. One Predator/Reaper type of UAV could have done the work of the 24 C-182s flying over Houston and been sending back live video instantly the whole time. Yes, something like that is the future.

By that logic wouldn't one surrogate predator be able to do that work?
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etodd
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 765

« Reply #57 on: September 13, 2017, 06:54:31 PM »


Bingo.  I've been in the control rooms standing behind the pilots and camera operators of Predators and seen the incredible visuals they can get, and the huge area they can cover. One Predator/Reaper type of UAV could have done the work of the 24 C-182s flying over Houston and been sending back live video instantly the whole time. Yes, something like that is the future.

By that logic wouldn't one surrogate predator be able to do that work?

No ... wouldn't have the range and time aloft capability a real Predator (or something a little downsized) does.  But will not happen any time soon I'm sure. Politics will take the place of practicality and technical ability for a few more years. The AF can't just buy a few Predator type UAS, set them up for SAR, sell off CAP's Cessna inventory, hand out retirement award certificates to folks at CAP Hdqrs ... all in one swoop.

These things take time ....
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blackrain
Seasoned Member

Posts: 297

« Reply #58 on: September 13, 2017, 08:07:19 PM »


Bingo.  I've been in the control rooms standing behind the pilots and camera operators of Predators and seen the incredible visuals they can get, and the huge area they can cover. One Predator/Reaper type of UAV could have done the work of the 24 C-182s flying over Houston and been sending back live video instantly the whole time. Yes, something like that is the future.

By that logic wouldn't one surrogate predator be able to do that work?

No ... wouldn't have the range and time aloft capability a real Predator (or something a little downsized) does.  But will not happen any time soon I'm sure. Politics will take the place of practicality and technical ability for a few more years. The AF can't just buy a few Predator type UAS, set them up for SAR, sell off CAP's Cessna inventory, hand out retirement award certificates to folks at CAP Hdqrs ... all in one swoop.

These things take time ....

Forget fuel reserve my bladder reserve can't come close to competing. As anyone whose done highbird knows bathroom break is last on the preflight checklist as well as judicious liquid consumption while airborne. Speaking of highbird, Global Hawk has a BACN (Battlefield Airborne Communications Node) package for communication relay and I can see highbird easily done by a UAV and possibly one of the first of our missions done by UAVs. Loiter time is how they establish patterns of life in the area in the foreign environment being quiet enough to often go unnoticed by those on the ground. While they don't now have Hellfires on board stateside UAVs I could imagine a few well placed strikes with the video posted to YouTube would be a huge deterrent to looters. >:D
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"If you find yourself in a fair fight, you didn't plan your mission properly" PVT Murphy
Commo
Recruit

Posts: 41
Unit: PCR-WA-002

« Reply #59 on: September 14, 2017, 01:15:34 PM »


Forget fuel reserve my bladder reserve can't come close to competing.

Gatorade provides multipurpose bottles for this purpose.  Hydration first, then re-used for... umm... un-hydration?

I don't recommend the lemon-lime flavor.

Long convoys, long flights.  It's simple, it works, and for safety: it helps maintain proper hydration.

Commo
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Aviation & Flying Activities  |  Topic: UAV/UAS/Drone licenses and current / future use in CAP
 


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