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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  The Lobby  |  Topic: Drone Pilot Badge - Everybody an ORIGINAL CAP Pilot?
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Author Topic: Drone Pilot Badge - Everybody an ORIGINAL CAP Pilot?  (Read 1964 times)
zippy
Recruit

Posts: 27

« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2017, 11:50:50 AM »


The Navy Sea Cadets page says they teach "Cyber Warfare." They actually use the words.
Read the below quote it says they learn Cyber Warfare to prepare for CyberPatriot.

Are you saying the US Navy Sea Cadets are ignorant about CyberPatriot? Also the Facebook page I quoted is from the US Navy.

Sorry, I go by what the US Navy Sea Cadet organization says. If you disagree with what the Sea Cadets say about Cyberpatriot, contact them and tell them they have no idea what they are talking about. Also perhaps contact the US Navy, they are saying the same thing. Maybe the Navy is ignorant as to what warfare is and need the advice of civilians.

From the US Navy Sea Cadet page:
Quote
Cyber Warfare Training. Computer Emergency Readiness Teams (CERTs) will learn computer and network installation, configuration and security best practices, with the use of Virtual Machines and packet tracker scenarios. The training prepares cadets for cybersecurity, STEM careers and the AFA CyberPatriot competition. http://www.seacadets.org/training/
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Mordecai
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,052
Unit: SI

« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2017, 11:59:09 AM »


The Navy Sea Cadets page says they teach "Cyber Warfare." They actually use the words.
Read the below quote it says they learn Cyber Warfare to prepare for CyberPatriot.

Are you saying the US Navy Sea Cadets are ignorant about CyberPatriot? Also the Facebook page I quoted is from the US Navy.

Sorry, I go by what the US Navy Sea Cadet organization says. If you disagree with what the Sea Cadets say about Cyberpatriot, contact them and tell them they have no idea what they are talking about. Also perhaps contact the US Navy, they are saying the same thing. Maybe the Navy is ignorant as to what warfare is and need the advice of civilians.

From the US Navy Sea Cadet page:
Quote
Cyber Warfare Training. Computer Emergency Readiness Teams (CERTs) will learn computer and network installation, configuration and security best practices, with the use of Virtual Machines and packet tracker scenarios. The training prepares cadets for cybersecurity, STEM careers and the AFA CyberPatriot competition. http://www.seacadets.org/training/

It should be noted that the CW training is distinct from the cyberpatriot byline on the navy sea cadet page.
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1st Lt Thompson
Seasoned Member

Posts: 351
Unit: GLR-MI-063

« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2017, 12:00:30 PM »

Zippy are you a part of a CAP Squadron, and involved in CyberPatriot? That question has been asked several times, with no answer from you, so I have to assume the answer is a big fat no! Don't believe everything you read on the internet, Abraham Lincoln said that! Join a local Squadron and get involved, and you will quickly learn what CP is and isn't, until then you're babbling about articles on the internet that may or may not be informed.

By the way, AuxNewsNow ran an article last year about CAP getting surplus A-10's for Search and Rescue activities......I read it on the internet, so it must be true!
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1st Lt Matt Thompson
Squadron Leadership Officer, Squadron Historian
UDF, GTM3, MSA, MS

Mitchell - 31 OCT 98 (#44670) Earhart - 22 MAY 01 (#11401)
Storm Chaser
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,676

« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2017, 04:08:45 PM »

Maj Gen Vazquez said at the past NSC that CAP will not be involved in cyber security in any way beyond CyberPatriot. I would say he's a reliable source. ;)
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CyBorgII
Member

Posts: 56
Unit: USCG AUX

« Reply #24 on: July 27, 2017, 04:54:27 PM »

The statute says to assist in "noncombat programs and missions." Most airmen in combat zones are in non-combat roles as mechanics, fuel handlers, food service, etc. Controlling a cam, either fixed or drone, would be likely considered non-combat, as nursing is. Especially if the cam is controlled from inside the US,

I am a former CAP Captain, 17 years' service.

I am a current member of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary.

I am a former member of the Air National Guard, who worked in Communications/IT and had a Top Secret security clearance.

I am a former IT professional, with an honours degree in Computer Information Systems and many years work in everything from building PC's to networking.

I have had my differences with people on this board, but in this case I have to support what they are saying.

Both the CAP and the CGAux are set up as noncombat, civilian auxiliaries.

One difference is that the Commandant of the Coast Guard can call the CGAux into military status, subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), as what is known as the Temporary Reserve (TR), but to my knowledge that has not happened since WWII.

CAP members guarded airfields with rifles in WWII, but again to my knowledge that has not happened since.  I do not know if any provision exists in current statute for the SecAF and/or CSAF to make such use of CAP in a national emergency to include armed conflict.  I never heard of such a thing during all my time in the CAP.

You are making very large leaps of logic.

The deployed Airmen you mention, whether in food services or whatever, can still be called upon to pick up a weapon at any time to defend their position from attack, or other circumstances as so ordered by competent authority.  They are combatant personnel at all times under the Geneva Conventions, even though they may not be acting at a given time in doing the actual shooting.  The only exception I know of are Chaplains, who under the Geneva Conventions do not bear arms.

When I was in the ANG I knew that if I were deployed in support of NATO (for example), setting up networking in a field situation, that I could still be called upon to use a weapon.

The same goes for the Drone Pilots you mention.  In fact, there is an entire New York Air National Guard Wing, that formerly flew F-16's, given over to that mission.  They are called the 174th Attack Wing (emphasis mine).

http://www.174attackwing.ang.af.mil/

These Guard members, even though they may be controlling their operations from their base in New York, are as much combatant personnel as an Airman deployed in Upickastan.  Those drones can and do carry things underwings to do damage.

There is no functional and/or conceptual similarity to what the CAP does with CyberPatriot.  The CAP does not, and, under current law, will not, bear weaponry.
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Whaddaya mean I ain't kind?  I'm just not YOUR kind!

Ex-CAP Captain, now CG Auxiliary, but still feel a great deal of affection for the many good people in CAP.
LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,690
Unit: Earth

« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2017, 05:09:21 PM »

are Chaplains, who under the Geneva Conventions do not bear arms.

That is not true. Chaplains do not carry weapons for philosophical reasons, not because they are noncombatants. That is why there are chaplain assistants. Medical personnel under the signage of a red cross or crescent are also considered noncombatants, but we carry weapons.  In fact, there is a Geneva code on the back of our IDs that are different from other officers.

I would also like to add that medical officers cannot be in command of other POWs, only other medical personnel.  So a 2LT Infantry officer can be in command of POW soldiers, but that O-6 physician cannot unless there are other medical personnel there.  This is to maintain Geneva code. 
« Last Edit: July 27, 2017, 05:14:16 PM by LSThiker » Logged
CyBorgII
Member

Posts: 56
Unit: USCG AUX

« Reply #26 on: July 29, 2017, 03:59:57 PM »

So noted and corrected.
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Whaddaya mean I ain't kind?  I'm just not YOUR kind!

Ex-CAP Captain, now CG Auxiliary, but still feel a great deal of affection for the many good people in CAP.
RRLE
Seasoned Member

Posts: 488

« Reply #27 on: September 01, 2017, 07:42:26 PM »

One difference is that the Commandant of the Coast Guard can call the CGAux into military status, subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), as what is known as the Temporary Reserve (TR), but to my knowledge that has not happened since WWII.

To clarify, the COMDT USCG cannot and could not "call", draft or otherwise force any Auxie into the Temporary Reserve (TR). The TR still exists in law but was terminated as an organization during WWII. The TRs had laudable and often unrecognized service. During WWII, Auxies could volunteer for the TRs but none were "called" or drafted into it.

What complicates the issue is that many volunteers for the TRs were forced to join the Aux first for "basic" training. That inflates the size of the Aux during WWII. Most of the TRs dropped their Aux affiliation after entering the TRs.

The Aux was only one of the groups supplying members to the TRs. The Aux served mostly in the Coastal Defense Force (boat patrols) and the Volunteer Port Security Force.

US Weather Bureau weatherman was placed in the TRs so they could serve on Navy ships and Coast Guard cutters. Many defense plant security guards very placed in the Coast Guard Police, a part of the TR, and retained at their place of employment for the duration. It was done this way because no other armed service had the equivalent of the TRs and using the CG got the job done.

Most of the SPARs (female Coasties) served as TRs.

The TRs were an interesting and often forgotten part of the WWII effort.
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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  The Lobby  |  Topic: Drone Pilot Badge - Everybody an ORIGINAL CAP Pilot?
 


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