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June 21, 2018, 09:32:22 PM
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CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts
CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts
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 21 
 on: Yesterday at 01:20:52 PM 
Started by Jester - Last post by Eclipse
"Yelling", per se, literally holds zero weight when the person on the receiving end knows full well that there is
no corporal or further punishment or ramifications beyond the yelling.  Yelling in CAP is the equivalent of
a military-themed amusement park - it's all fun an games to "play Army", but there's no real risk and
everyone knows they can just head for the exit if things get too "real".

Those of us of a certain age with strict parents grew up in a world where corporal punishment was not only common, it was expected, and could be
metered out by not just parents, but others in "loco parentis", so the yelling had an apocalyptic period at the end of the sentence
if you didn't knock it off, and there was no "wait until my lawyer hears of this!" from a 12 year old, as is the case today.

If Sister smacked you with a ruler, or the shop teacher offered you "3 hits or 3 hours" (detention), you took it (probably with the
grounded knowledge that you messed up), and hoped to your deity that "Dad didn't find out", because if he did, it wasn't going to be
"I will give that nun a good talking to..." it was going to probably be a couple more of the same.

Kids today know that there is nothing at the end of the yelling, except, perhaps, a myocardial infarction, and most will just stand there
and wait you out, until you realize you look like an idiot and move on to some other means of persuading the desired behavior.
This is something that is ingrained in them from pre-school, and CAP is not going to change that.

A child persuaded to a behavior via no other means then the threat of corporal punishment, is essentially
a prisoner in that situation.

Couple that with the generalized anxiety disorders and worse that kids are saddle with today.  It is literally impossible to
snap a kid with an anxiety disorder "out of it" by yelling at him in a punitive way, it just makes it worse, on an escalating scale.

This is the world CAP exists in today, accept it or not, this is not a fact you can dispute, and again, I'll be happy to debate
the hows and whys over coffee, but CAP isn't going to be a factor in changing it, and it can't influence or help anyone who
quits before they have a chance to even hear the lessons.

So, with the above said...

For those espousing the "yelling at", it might be interesting to know what, exactly, you think you're supposed to be yelling "about"?

 - Improper uniform wear?

This cadet has been in CAP 3 weeks and received his uniform yesterday. Mom put the nametape on the wrong side as she
sewed it in the car on the way to encampment.


 - Inability to march / drill properly?

His unit staff is made up of 3 moms with no military experience who are barely keeping the doors open as-is,
and didn't understand the directions. The oldest cadet in the unit is a C/SrA.


 - He's late getting up the first morning, and slow to get his hygiene done.

This cadet couldn't get off school and lives 10 hours away, he was up for 17 hours the day before and hasn't
had his medication yet this morning.  BTW, this cadet, like many these days, is up every day at 0600 or earlier and
routinely turns his nightlight off at midnight because of homework he can't start until 10pm, after sports and band, and yes
CAP meetings.


- Cadet isn't running fast enough?  Can't do enough pushups (define "enough")?

- Cadet doesn't dress for the pool because he can't swim.

- Cadet's parents didn't tell him his boss for his summer job called and he has to leave encampment early.

- Cadet arrives 2+ hours late for encampment because his parent, unit CC, etc., had to work, or simply wasn't in a hurry.

- Cadet brings, or doesn't bring, something he should or shouldn't have, because his Unit CC "knows better" and advised him improperly?

- Cadet couldn't afford new boots and the ones he was able to borrow are too small and tore up his feet.

These are not adults, being consistently trained, and who are responsible for their own lives, these are 12-year olds
who in many cases have never spent a night away from home, and whose parent' only have 1/2-an idea what CAP even is.

So...what's all the shouting for?

 22 
 on: Yesterday at 12:31:26 PM 
Started by huey - Last post by Brad
My understanding from my recent SUI is that AoC’s are no longer a thing. It also does not appear in the ratings definition section of the SUI template. It might still be somewhere else, I didn’t look that hard.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Huh. Yeah they did take AoCs out, I just looked through the SUI Report template.

 23 
 on: Yesterday at 12:30:03 PM 
Started by Jester - Last post by Trenzalorian
This is the breeding of weakness.  It's making cadets who think it's supposed to be all fun, all the time.

Isn't it?

Quote from: CAPR 60-1

1.6.5. Fun. CAP should be fun. New friends and great opportunities are the hallmarks of cadet life.
The cadets who work hard in CAP reap the most benefits, but the program should not be another form of
school – it needs to be fun, hands-on, rewarding, and exciting. Proper adult supervision, an emphasis on
risk management, and teamwork built upon mutual respect create a safe and fun environment. Every
activity should be fun, for cadets and their adult leaders alike.

+1.

 24 
 on: Yesterday at 11:19:57 AM 
Started by RiChArD7032 - Last post by RiChArD7032
True...I will do that.

 25 
 on: Yesterday at 11:12:20 AM 
Started by RiChArD7032 - Last post by arajca
Have you contacted your wing counterpart for a recommendation? They would have a better idea of the issues and policies for your wing.

 26 
 on: Yesterday at 11:10:16 AM 
Started by RiChArD7032 - Last post by RiChArD7032
I'm a newly assigned ESO and I have zero experience.  I printed out the specialty track and will begin knocking out the training list for the tech level.  But, in the mean time, is there any experienced ESO's here that I can ask questions and have as a mentor?  My unit hasn't had a ESO for how ever long so there's nobody who has filled the role to assist me.  My Commander knows a lot, but I'd like to utilize other sources since he's very busy with several programs of his own. 

Thanks for the help!

 27 
 on: Yesterday at 10:48:31 AM 
Started by Jester - Last post by Blanding
This is the breeding of weakness.  It's making cadets who think it's supposed to be all fun, all the time.

Isn't it?

Quote from: CAPR 60-1

1.6.5. Fun. CAP should be fun. New friends and great opportunities are the hallmarks of cadet life.
The cadets who work hard in CAP reap the most benefits, but the program should not be another form of
school – it needs to be fun, hands-on, rewarding, and exciting. Proper adult supervision, an emphasis on
risk management, and teamwork built upon mutual respect create a safe and fun environment. Every
activity should be fun, for cadets and their adult leaders alike.

 28 
 on: Yesterday at 10:19:22 AM 
Started by Eclipse - Last post by jeders
The adults were always first in line for chow while many cadets went without food; registration was closed so the adults could party with the fighter pilots (even though a couple hundred people had no bunks assigned); cadets were left in parking lots for hours without relief or refreshments.

I can't even...

Reminds me of the year I went to the Oshkosh NCSA. The event is basically broken into two camps, the "cadet" side and the "ES" side who were all seniors, including a couple of full-bird colonels. The ES staff would barge into the DFAC and cut to the front of the chow line. So there's some poor cadet with 50 cadets behind him and a dozen or so senior members just walk right in front of him, often cutting him off from the rest of his flight who were ahead of him in line.

I asked about it and was told by leadership that the ES guys do their own thing and it's just how it works.

Also because they may have been up since 0400 hunting down a half dozen ELTs and have to quickly eat before getting back to work because they are short staffed. In recent years, fortunately, the ES Team has grown in size which allows them to have shifts shorter than 8 hours; this also allows them to wait for their place in line.

 29 
 on: Yesterday at 01:33:17 AM 
Started by huey - Last post by Holding Pattern

I will still write up a SUI AoC if the member has not progressed to Technician or Senior in a reasonable amount of time (2 years or more). 


Nearly three years now and I'm not working on a track. I'm a Mission Pilot, Airborne Photographer, Mission Observer, Mission Scanner. I fly several hours a month on Army Missions, O'Rides, Transport, and more as needed. I've brought in new Cadets to the squadron and help in that area when I can. I stay so busy being active, that I don't have enough hours to work on tracks to get a certificate. I'm a worker bee. Maybe at our last SUI someone "wrote us up" because of me. I don't know. But ask any squadron members and they'll tell you they are very happy with my contributions. That means more to me that any ribbon, certificate, or rank.

You may want to consider being in the ES track.

I was assigned to it when I joined, but as I said, time is an issue. As well as so many things on the list of things to do, that don't exist in our squadron. I forget now, is been a couple years, but things like a library and certain file keeping, or some things like that that don't exist and can't be pulled together for some reason. I'll try and go back soon and look. We have ES officers in our squadron, so they must have skipped over the things I mention.  Kind of like when I started AP a couple years ago and so much of the Mission Task Guide was out of date and we just had to skip some items on the SQTR sheet. Some times you just have to "make do".  LOL

The training plan and library are the only 2 checkboxes that you probably haven't fulfilled. TBH, Neither of them take terribly long, especially if you work on it with another person.

And there really isn't a time limit.

I'm sure you are probably correct. I looked at the Technician test awhile back and at only 20 questions, knocked that out quickly one night. I still need IS-800.    100,200, and 700 all seemed very repetitive to me. I'll see what 800 is like soon.

IS800 recently got redone by FEMA. It isn't the snoozefest it used to be, though it is still a bit dry.

 30 
 on: June 19, 2018, 11:15:52 PM 
Started by Jester - Last post by Trenzalorian
NY, when I went in '13, '14 and '15, was extremely tame as far as intensity goes. Shouting, yelling, and the like are very heavily discouraged, with the reasoning being hazing concerns. It looks like it will remain that way this year. I'll have some more discussions about this with my DCC and Commander, but at this point, it's staying tame.

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