Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
July 27, 2017, 10:44:29 AM
Home Help Login Register
News:

CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts
CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10

 1 
 on: Today at 10:40:01 AM 
Started by zippy - Last post by zippy
And as an IT guy, I'd definitely not characterize what CyberPatriot is teaching as "cyberwarfare" anything.

Please read the below quotes. I am not making this up. See the words "cyber warfare."
The below quote actually says students are learning about cyber warfare at cyberpatriot.
Cyber Warfare defense is basically the same as a bank defending its system, just a fancy phrase.


Quote
NJROTC cadets compete in all-service cyber warfare competition
April 6, 2011 at 1:28pm
National Harbor, Md. (April 1, 2011) - Six Ramona High School (Calif.) Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) cadets participated in the Air Force Association's (AFA) CyberPatriot III National Finals Competition here April1.
CyberPatriot is a cyber defense competition created to excite, educate and motivate the next generation of cyber defenders and other science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduates.
]https://www.facebook.com/notes/naval-service-training-command/njrotc-cadets-compete-in-all-service-cyber-warfare-competition/201497036548828/
[/url]

Quote
LJHS students compete in cyber warfare

 La Jolla High’s Viking Cyber Security Team participants Sahil Sangani, George Brabon and Andy Hill watch as Patrick Sapin works on securing a web server during the CyberPatriot III Open Division Round 3 competition at the school on Jan. 8. Last year, the team took first place nationally in the first year the competition was open to public schools.

“I think it’s really interesting. Cyber security and cyber warfare are very important topics in our society today,” he said. “There needs to be kids like us who are learning about it and this is a fun way to do it.”

http://www.sdnews.com/view/full_story/11002213/article-LJHS-students-compete-in-cyber-warfare?instance=update1

 2 
 on: Today at 09:19:43 AM 
Started by zippy - Last post by N Harmon
Hey Zippy, the Aux Beacon is not exactly an unbiased source. So I would not put a lot of trust in what you read there...

Is the Zippy here the same Zippy who posted this comment to that Aux Beacon story?


Ziggy ... not Zippy.  Little details matter ;)

Oh good catch! Okay, is Zippy also the Ziggy who posted that comment to the Aux Beacon story?

 3 
 on: Today at 09:17:41 AM 
Started by zippy - Last post by N Harmon
Whatever route you choose, your posts here long ago went past being inquiries and are firmly emplaced in the arena of pot stirring.

Agreed.

 4 
 on: Today at 08:49:28 AM 
Started by zippy - Last post by NIN
And as an IT guy, I'd definitely not characterize what CyberPatriot is teaching as "cyberwarfare" anything.

Its mostly a set of skills for the modern age. Yes, system hardening is a defensive measure, but it is not specific to "cyberwarfare" any moreso than teaching a cadet how to drive a backhoe is teaching "trench warfare." 

The CyberPatriot technologies and methods are used day in and day out in companies all over the world to maintain the business and prevent data loss.  You're protecting from everything from an errant employee accidentally deleting the entire company public share to Tommy The Plumber clicking on a virus laden email and Cryptolocking the whole company.  Sure, this might be a helpful skill if you're eventually working for the American Voting Machine & Tabulating Company, Inc because who knows might be knocking at your (virtual) door, but you're also not learning how to conduct DDOS attacks on the FSB's public webserver...


 5 
 on: Today at 08:25:48 AM 
Started by zippy - Last post by Paul Creed III
I direct your attention to Title 36 U.S. Code Chapter 403, which is CAP's basic charter. Title 10 U.S. Code Chapter 909 is also relevant. Both emphasize the civilian nature of CAP, and neither mention combat operations in any way.

Public Laws 79-476 and 80-557 also apply.


CAP is already teaching cyber warfare. See Below. Cyber warfare is warfare, but the military lists these jobs as non-combat. Military installations in combat zones have cams on the perimeter and for miles around. I read the statute, if the Air Force considers someone controlling zoomable/moveable cams in a war zone while sitting in a location in the USA as a non-combat job, then it likely allowable is within the statute.

The statute says to assist in "noncombat programs and missions." Most airmen in combat zones are in non-combat roles as mechanics, fuel handlers, food service, etc. Controlling a cam, either fixed or drone, would be
 likely considered non-combat, as nursing is. Especially if the cam is controlled from inside the US,

CAP has computers online. I can picture some foreign hostile trying to hack in to a CAP computer, and so does the CAP organization.

"Unit Web Security Administrator" is part of the Information Technology Officer Specialty Track. So, CAP leadership obviously wants members to defend against cyber attacks. If it is a hostile, then it is cyber warfare.

From a CAP training manual:
Quote
Cyber Warfare

Several western books define cyberwarfare as actions by a nation-state to penetrate another nation's
computers or networks for the purposes of causing damage or disruption. However, the Shanghai
Cooperation Organisation extends the definition of cyberwar to include dissemination of information
"harmful to the spiritual, moral and cultural spheres of other states". This difference of opinion likely
prevents western governments from signing certain global cyber arms control agreements.
Cyber Warfare consists of many different possible threats and countermeasures. Cyber
Espionage and Cyber Sabotage are two fundamental classifications of attack, into which other
threats may fall.  https://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/CAP_AECyberModule_9D4693A49944D.pdf 

CAP does NOT teach offensive cyber actions, only defensive.

 6 
 on: Today at 01:47:16 AM 
Started by zippy - Last post by zippy
I direct your attention to Title 36 U.S. Code Chapter 403, which is CAP's basic charter. Title 10 U.S. Code Chapter 909 is also relevant. Both emphasize the civilian nature of CAP, and neither mention combat operations in any way.

Public Laws 79-476 and 80-557 also apply.


CAP is already teaching cyber warfare. See Below. Cyber warfare is warfare, but the military lists these jobs as non-combat. Military installations in combat zones have cams on the perimeter and for miles around. I read the statute, if the Air Force considers someone controlling zoomable/moveable cams in a war zone while sitting in a location in the USA as a non-combat job, then it likely allowable is within the statute.

The statute says to assist in "noncombat programs and missions." Most airmen in combat zones are in non-combat roles as mechanics, fuel handlers, food service, etc. Controlling a cam, either fixed or drone, would be
 likely considered non-combat, as nursing is. Especially if the cam is controlled from inside the US,

CAP has computers online. I can picture some foreign hostile trying to hack in to a CAP computer, and so does the CAP organization.

"Unit Web Security Administrator" is part of the Information Technology Officer Specialty Track. So, CAP leadership obviously wants members to defend against cyber attacks. If it is a hostile, then it is cyber warfare.

From a CAP training manual:
Quote
Cyber Warfare

Several western books define cyberwarfare as actions by a nation-state to penetrate another nation's
computers or networks for the purposes of causing damage or disruption. However, the Shanghai
Cooperation Organisation extends the definition of cyberwar to include dissemination of information
"harmful to the spiritual, moral and cultural spheres of other states". This difference of opinion likely
prevents western governments from signing certain global cyber arms control agreements.
Cyber Warfare consists of many different possible threats and countermeasures. Cyber
Espionage and Cyber Sabotage are two fundamental classifications of attack, into which other
threats may fall.  https://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/CAP_AECyberModule_9D4693A49944D.pdf 

 7 
 on: Today at 01:44:33 AM 
Started by Ravenwings - Last post by SarDragon
Question asked; question answered.

Unless someone PMs a mod with a compelling reason to open this back up, we're done here.

Click.

 8 
 on: Today at 12:42:51 AM 
Started by zippy - Last post by Mitchell 1969
Zippy:

Are you a member of CAP? If so, you should be taking up your ideas with your local unit. If not, feel free to join. Or, if that isn't your style, feel free to write some "alternate history" novels featuring the CAP of your dreams. Whatever route you choose, your posts here long ago went past being inquiries and are firmly emplaced in the arena of pot stirring.

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 11:30:24 PM 
Started by Ethan Larsen - Last post by MSG Mac
yes

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 11:07:46 PM 
Started by Ravenwings - Last post by Mordecai
The initial para also calls out specifically:
DOD Instruction 1300.28, In-Service Transition For Transgender Service Members
So unless that CAPR changes, nothing changes.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.13 | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.337 seconds with 15 queries.
click here to email me