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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Uniforms & Awards  |  Topic: First specialty: health services officer?
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Geber
Recruit

Posts: 12
Unit: NER-VT-009

« on: November 27, 2017, 09:16:42 AM »

I'm a new member; I joined in October. I have completed the requirements for ICUT, level 1, and GES, but the latter two have not been entered into eServices yet. I find it hard to understand what can/should be entered in eServices because I can only see the options that I'm authorized to perform, not what my squadron commander can perform.

I am an Emergency Medical Technician. Can the squadron commander enter that into eServices as a qualification at the technician level? Or maybe that has to be done on paper, since there isn't any "pamphlet" for that specialty? Once that is done, am I allowed to wear the health services technician badge or patch (depending on which uniform I'm wearing)?

Does being an EMT qualify me to be a 2nd LT, once the appropriate forms are processed, or is it necessary to be a paramedic to become a 2nd LT in less than 6 months?

If the squadron commander so desires, can he appoint me to be the squadron health services officer? Is such a position available for checking off in eServices?

Is a health services qualification considered an emergency services qualification, so that once achieved, I could wear the emergency services badge/patch at the technician level?

I expect my main emphasis in CAP will be communications, but I don't have questions about that because the path for communicators is much better laid out in eServices.

My previous career is in electronics and computers, which is why I'm interested in communications, and also why I have become more comfortable with eServices than some of the longer-serving members of my squadron.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2017, 09:39:08 AM by Geber » Logged
arajca
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 4,169

« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2017, 09:58:18 AM »




Welcome aboard. I insetred my comments in red.
I'm a new member; I joined in October. I have completed the requirements for ICUT, level 1, and GES, but the latter two have not been entered into eServices yet. I find it hard to understand what can/should be entered in eServices because I can only see the options that I'm authorized to perform, not what my squadron commander can perform.

I am an Emergency Medical Technician. Can the squadron commander enter that into eServices as a qualification at the technician level? Or maybe that has to be done on paper, since there isn't any "pamphlet" for that specialty? Once that is done, am I allowed to wear the health services technician badge or patch (depending on which uniform I'm wearing)?
There is no progression in the health services track. There is no active plan that has been disseminated, although it has been in the past.

Does being an EMT qualify me to be a 2nd LT, once the appropriate forms are processed, or is it necessary to be a paramedic to become a 2nd LT in less than 6 months?EMT  qualifies.

If the squadron commander so desires, can he appoint me to be the squadron health services officer? Is such a position available for checking off in eServices?Yes

Is a health services qualification considered an emergency services qualification, so that once achieved, I could wear the emergency services badge/patch at the technician level?No and no

I expect my main emphasis in CAP will be communications, but I don't have questions about that because the path for communicators is much better laid out in eServices. That's a good track. If you can set up an HF antenna, the Communications folks would be happy - CAP is rebuilding its HF network.

My previous career is in electronics and computers, which is why I'm interested in communications, and also why I have become more comfortable with eServices than some of the longer-serving members of my squadron.
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award
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Posts: 28,074

« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2017, 10:12:17 AM »

Stick with Comms.
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"The man who does more than he is paid for will soon be paid for more than he does." - Napoleon Hill.
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by eclipse. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

Geber
Recruit

Posts: 12
Unit: NER-VT-009

« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2017, 10:25:06 AM »

I intend to emphasize comms. But since the law obliges me to assist in case of a medical emergency in my immediate vicinity, I think my specialty might as well reflect that. Also, all our squadron staff are burdened with lots of administrative work; if there is something I can help with in the health services area, I will.
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LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,711
Unit: Earth

« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2017, 10:54:43 AM »

I intend to emphasize comms. But since the law obliges me to assist in case of a medical emergency in my immediate vicinity, I think my specialty might as well reflect that. Also, all our squadron staff are burdened with lots of administrative work; if there is something I can help with in the health services area, I will.

On CAPTalk, you will find 3 kinds of people regarding the HSO position:  1) those completely against it; 2) those for it; and 3) those who do not care.  As such, asking any questions regarding HSO will typically get into a discussion about whether or not the HS program should be eliminated. 

I have been a wing HSO and a squadron HSO, while also serving in other specialty tracks such as CP, AE, Historian, ES, & Comm. There is not much of a laid out plan for the HSO due to a large number of variations in laws between states.  Since its creation in 1942, the HSO Program has been shaped into a purely administrative position.  Any HSO trained person is not required to become an HSO; likewise, any HSO is not required to take on any additional specialties or duty positions.  Of course, that decision is for the member. 

Since there is no laid out formal plan for HSOs (when compared to other specialty tracks), you can easily focus on both Comm and HS.  In addition, you and the commander can make the HSO position into what serves the squadron best as long as you do not violate law or CAP regulation, which I would refer you to CAPR 160 series.  You can stay a purely advisor position or you can branch into more educational position.  For cadet AE nights, I have taught:  space and flight physiology, astrobiology, biometeorology, and many other topics.  While there is no direct relationship of the HSO program and ES, you can also assist in this area as well.  However, it is advised that you also certify in ES, such as GTM or GTL, before doing such.  Nevertheless, an expected area for the HSO is to assist in is setting up first aid and CPR training events for cadets if the squadron desires.

Bottomline, read CAPR 160-1, talk with your SQ/CC, talk with the Wing HSO (if available), and formulate a plan for your participation in either HS Program, Comm, or both, or neither.
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award
***
Posts: 28,074

« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2017, 11:08:14 AM »

I intend to emphasize comms. But since the law obliges me to assist in case of a medical emergency in my immediate vicinity, I think my specialty might as well reflect that.

Your specialty track has no reflection or relation to your ability, or lack thereof, to respond to an "emergency in your vicinity", nor
is it connected in any way to any Emergency Services qualifications, which are a 100% separate.

You need to do some research and get a full understanding of the ramifications of putting yourself a situation
such as this in a CAP uniform, where the regs are clear that if you do much of anything beyond basic first aid, you
are on your own liability-wise.
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"The man who does more than he is paid for will soon be paid for more than he does." - Napoleon Hill.
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by eclipse. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

EMT-83
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,824

« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2017, 11:09:02 AM »

If you get appointed as Health Services Officer, be prepared to develop and administer a valid health services program. You will need to do this from scratch and send it up the chain for approval, because there is zero guidance available. One this is done, and the program is in operation, submit a request for promotion. If you accept a promotion based solely on the fact that youíre an EMT, without actually performing the duties of an HSO, you have accepted a fraudulent promotion.

To be clear, CAP does not provide medical treatment. Let me repeat that: CAP does not provide medical treatment. Any duty to act based upon your licensure has no bearing on that fact. If you do provide medical treatment, youíre on your own. By the way, CAP does not provide medical treatment.

Comms is looking better all the time, isnít it?
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Brad
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 778
Unit: MER-SC-020

« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2017, 05:23:40 AM »

Also, you can have multiple specialty tracks.
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Brad Lee
Maj, CAP
Assistant Director of Communications
SCWG
K4RMN
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