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December 11, 2017, 03:46:36 AM
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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Encampments & NCSAs  |  Topic: Another AFSUPTFC question
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FNelson
Recruit

Posts: 13
Unit: SWR-NM-018

« on: November 22, 2017, 01:56:24 PM »

The other day I asked what people would recommended I do before attending AFSUPTFC and I got some good information. But another question I have that I did not ask in my last post is which AFSUPTFC course I should apply for? There is the one at Laughlin AFB, TX and another at Columbus AFB, MS. Is there a difference between the two, does the difference matter, which is easier to get to for people coming from a state other than one where the course is being held.
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TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 910

« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2017, 02:08:41 PM »

I strongly encourage you to avoid being picky about which location you go to.

If your goal is to service in the military as an aviator in particular, try not to "pipeline" yourself too much toward "whatever is better." It irritates selection boards when you try to get your way.

My understanding is that both courses are nearly identical, with the exception of the location/climate. I believe an exception is that Laughlin offers the T-38 simulator, whereas Columbus offers a T-6 simulator. Apply for the dates that work for you (Laughlin is in June, Columbus in in July).

I know Laughlin has both the T-6 and T-38 simulators. I had a cadet who went, and they only got into the T-38. Both locations offer flights in the T-1A for "top cadets" in the program. I heard back that the flights were scrapped when that cadet attended, but other classes got their rides.

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jeders
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,010

« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2017, 03:44:38 PM »

My understanding is that both courses are nearly identical...

My understanding, from cadets that have attended both in the past, is that they are actually quite different as far as the philosophy behind how each one is presented. One is a little more hands on while the other is more observational, and for the life of me I can't remember which is which. So, my recommendation is, assuming you have the time in CAP left to do it, apply for and go to both; one this year and the other next year. Doing that will give you as full an exposure to pilot training as you're going to get without actually being in the Air Force.
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If you are confident in you abilities and experience, whether someone else is impressed is irrelevant. - Eclipse
FallenTX
Recruit

Posts: 10
Unit: SWR-TX-351

« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2017, 11:32:18 AM »

What jeders said is true. Laughlin is more of a base tour style where you see what’s going on with everything. Whereas in Columbus you actually interact more and get tested on a lot of the same stuff as the student pilots and actually get to interact along side them for a final exercise.

All incentive flights have been scrapped by Air Force due to finding lately though.


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NC Hokie
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 884
Unit: MER-NC-057

« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2017, 10:42:10 PM »

Whereas in Columbus you actually interact more and get tested on a lot of the same stuff as the student pilots and actually get to interact along side them for a final exercise.

My daughter went to Columbus in 2013. Her favorite story to tell is about an informal study session where the CAP cadets helped new student pilots memorize the T-6A Boldface/Ops Limits that the cadets were tested on when they arrived at the activity.  She's been out of CAP for a couple of years now, but she can still quote the engine out and emergency procedures for the Texan II from memory!
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William Hess, Maj, CAP
Tar River Actual
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,876

« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2017, 01:54:54 AM »

Military aviation is full of stuff (Bold Face and Critical Action Procedures) that has to be memorized.
One of the most useful skills I learned as a CAP Cadet was to learn how to memorize stuff.
Served me well during the 28-1/2 years I flew for the Air Force / Air Force Reserve.
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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Encampments & NCSAs  |  Topic: Another AFSUPTFC question
 


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